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This Is Crazy And Cool And, Yeah  
User currently offlineSJCguy From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 579 posts, RR: 1
Posted (12 years 9 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1614 times:

I bet you guys know this, but I just figured it out for myself.

I always wondered what happens with the wheels after the plane lifts off. Your screamin down the runway, and after you lift off, the wheels have got to be spinning pretty damn fast. As the gear goes up into the doors, I found out the pilot taps the breaks and stops the wheels from spinning as it goes into the bay. The nose gear however keeps spinning and is stopped as it enters the bay. Know how I found this out?.....

Today at work, I went up to one of our 737's (I work for SW ramp) and the rim-cover on our wheels as most of you know is orange like the bottom of our jets. Usually though, those covers are caked over with break-dust and grime so some of them are almost black. Well I took a cloth, and made a big spiral in the center of the wheel in the grime. After I pushed the plane (it was tail 797MX) I took my tug and sorta followed it down about half way down the runway. After he took off, he went right in front of me and I saw my spiral spinning violently on the wheel, then it stopped and the wheels went up. Cool huh? Anyways, look for 797 out there.  Smile

SJCguy

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSerge From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1989 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (12 years 9 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1497 times:

Cool!  Big thumbs up

I will be flying WN for the first time in years on February 22nd from OAK to SAN returning same day  Smile


Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © James Richard Covington, Jr




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Photo © Joe G. Walker




Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © James Richard Covington, Jr



...Serge


User currently offlineAWspicious From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 9 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1490 times:

I'm not being sarcastic when I say I sometimes enjoy reading light threads like this.
 Smile/happy/getting dizzy


User currently offlineQFTJT From Australia, joined Dec 2000, 278 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 9 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1482 times:

I pretty sure (not 100%) that the wheels are stopped automatically before they are fully retracted. Without the crew even touching the brakes


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Photo © Craig Murray



QFTJT


User currently offlineAv8trxx From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 657 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (12 years 9 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1452 times:

SJCguy-
Look at the ceiling of the nosewell: If you haven't noticed, it has a pad affixed on it to stop the spinning of the nosegear. We used to write things in the rubber dust covering the inside of the well. It was really bad on the -200s.

Now if you really want to get your 737 jollies- go to this site: or sign up for the weekend B737 ground school at ATOP. It's a blast. E-mail me if you are interested.

There's a lot of info that will make the big picture a lot clearer about why certain things are that way as a ramper. Everything you ever wanted to know. Impress the other rampers.....(Uh OK, maybe not.) While I too get excited about aircraft, most of our guys would rather be sleeping in the breakroom.


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21484 posts, RR: 53
Reply 5, posted (12 years 9 months 18 hours ago) and read 1340 times:

The main gear wheels in (most?) modern airliners are braked automatically during retraction. The nose gear doesn´t have brakes and thus uses those pads in the wheel well.

(Info from earlier posts in the tech/ops forum.)


User currently offlineDazed767 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5498 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (12 years 9 months 18 hours ago) and read 1334 times:

Wow, never really thought about that til now.....interesting......

User currently offlineLoneStarMike From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 3856 posts, RR: 34
Reply 7, posted (12 years 9 months 18 hours ago) and read 1325 times:

Anyways, look for 797 out there.

How funny... I picked up some pictures awhile ago that I had taken to get developed yesterday. There were 3 or 4 pictures of 797 at the gate in AUS.

Great story, BTW, SJCguy.

LoneStarMike

User currently offlineJgardiner From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 114 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (12 years 9 months ago) and read 1265 times:

The biggest reason for braking the gear before moving it is the gyroscope effect. With the wheels spinning that fast it takes a lot of force to move them sideways. By stopping the wheels the gear used to retract them can be that much lighter and cheaper.

The nose gear doesn't need it because it is being retracted in the same plane as the spin.




User currently offlineRydawg82 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 867 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (12 years 9 months ago) and read 1251 times:

Heyas....Great post on this before....Some adtl reading info...
http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/13438


Iv commonly heard the piece that stops the nose gear spin, a snubber....RyRy



You can take the pup out of Alaska, but you can't take the Alaska out of the pup.
User currently offlineRoyalDutch From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 917 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1213 times:

I once sat in seat 7A on an LH Fokker 50, and I could see the main gear right out the window, and I remember it stopping before entering the bay...very interesting. Great Post SJCguy!

User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 11, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1193 times:

Royal Dutch - its cool isn't it!!!!

For a start, i thought that, well its quite hard to explain.. the wheels weren't weighted so they had no momentum and as soon as they left the tarmac they just stopped, wasn't until i stepped in an F50 and saw the gear after we had taken off and the wheels were still spinning!!!

the Fokker 50 is still the best.

Regards

Dan


User currently offlineMr.BA From Singapore, joined Sep 2000, 3423 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1126 times:

I am not too sure about other aircraft, but you don't have to step on the brakes to stop the wheels spinning before it goes into the bay. There is a system that stops the wheels.

alvin



Boeing747 万岁!
User currently offlineILS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1119 times:

What a great exoeriance. How close to the runway were you?

User currently offlineSJCguy From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 579 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1080 times:

It was the next runway after the taxi way i was sitting at, close enough to see passengers..

SJCguy


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