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777 Pilots On 340  
User currently offlineF.pier From Italy, joined Aug 2000, 1523 posts, RR: 10
Posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1488 times:

Imagine to be on a long transcontinental flight, for example a 777 JFK-HKG non stop.

The flight is ok, but unfortunately both the pilots have an heart attack and die in the middle of the flight.

Onboard, as a passenger (for pleasure) there is an Airbus 340 pilot.

Can he continue the flight and land safely the 777???

What about the opposite (a 777 pilot on a 340 transcontinental flight)?????

Thank you

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDC10Tony From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1012 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1401 times:

I don't know about the 340 pilot, it takes balls to fly the big 777.  Smile

If anything, I bet the A340 pilot could fly the 777, but if the tables were turned, the 777 pilot might have trouble flying the 340 with the joystick.


User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1372 times:

I would expect any transport category pilot to be able to land any category transport plane. Some of the 727 pilots might have trouble with some of the new system, but nothing they could not be talked through by a chap on the ground. I am not saying they could grease it in but they could get it down.
I also see no problems with the sidestick, infact I would put my money on when the plane is on short final the pilots would not be aware of the difference.
Iain


User currently offlineMarc Kobaissi From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 119 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 1314 times:


Boeing pilots are not trained on any of the functions of the Airbus fly by wire system. Especially all of the functions that require right-clicking.



User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 1298 times:

^^ We are not talking about knowing the plane inside and out, we are talking about just getting the blessid thing on the ground with help over the radio!
Iain


User currently offlineMarc Kobaissi From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 119 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 1287 times:


Me too. To know an airbus inside and out, you'd need a degree in java, HTML, or at least FORTRAN.



User currently offlineSaab2000 From Switzerland, joined Jun 2001, 1609 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 1280 times:

I agree with Iainhol that any qualified airline pilot could fly it, especially with help from the ground. The flight would be mostly autopilot flown, maybe even autoland, and they all work very similarly. In the extremely unlikely event that something like this happened, it is likely that the plane would be vectored to a field with VMC and the pilot might make an autoland or maybe not and he would fly the thing a bit by hand to get the feel for it. But I have no doubt that any good pilot of a large airliner could fly any other large airliner if his life depended on it.


smrtrthnu
User currently offlineRacko From Germany, joined Nov 2001, 4856 posts, RR: 20
Reply 7, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1224 times:

i agree.

The landing might be rough if he makes it by hand, but i'm sure that he could land it without problems.

Oh, and actually the FBW airbus is not such a big problem, with its autotrim feature the pilots should get used it within 5 minutes or something  Smile


User currently offlineCaptaingomes From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 6413 posts, RR: 56
Reply 8, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1225 times:

Despite what A and B fans might think, airplanes are all very similar in nature. They are designed with the same principles. Knowing all the basics, and having airline experience, yes, I do believe that any airline pilot with some experience could get any other airline down safely. They might have to do a go around, and they will need to know what the stall speeds are, etc, but in the end, they'll get the aircraft on the ground.

All modern airliners have similar flight characteristics, they do similar things when they stall, etc etc.



"it's kind of like an Airbus, it's an engineering marvel, but there's no sense of passion" -- J. Clarkson re: Coxster
User currently offlineJvW From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 173 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1211 times:

Both the B777 and the Airbus A340 can land themselves when programmed correctly; I would imagine that someone on the ground could tell the 'new' pilot how to do this and just let the aircraft do the landing...

JvW


User currently offlineLMML 14/32 From Malta, joined Jan 2001, 2565 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1203 times:

JvW came up with the perfect solution. Which just proves the KISS principle.
But let us say that the incidental pilot wants to hand fly the plane down - I say of course he will land it safely. Just think - an A340 driver in a B777 driver's seat (or vice verca): How resistible is that?


User currently offlineAirblue From San Marino, joined May 2001, 1825 posts, RR: 11
Reply 11, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1097 times:

I also think any qualified airline pilot could land it, especially with help from the ground.

Sure an A340 pilot could fly a B777 easier than me Smile!!!


User currently offlineRuscoe From Australia, joined Aug 1999, 1516 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1025 times:

Just as a matter of interest. SAA pilots will soon be flying both the 340 and the 777 in a flyoff for the SAA order.

Ruscoe


User currently offlineDatamanA340 From South Korea, joined Dec 2000, 547 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 1 day ago) and read 969 times:

Yoke or sidestick doesn't matter. What a 777 pilot will have difficulty is 340's 4 engines. As you know, 4 engine-system is quite more difficult to operate.

But I agree that if it's on emergency, both of pilots can land the opposite side relatively easily.


User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 931 times:

I do see why 4 engines will be any different the 2, on the basic level of getting the plane down.
Iain


User currently offlineSllevin From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 3376 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (12 years 2 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 890 times:

I would expect any reasonably skilled pilot to actually be handle the job. Transport pilots would have it the easiest, of course.

But the truth is, training (and type-specific training) is largely about extreme issues -- when the aircraft systems malfunction. Flying an "all engines" approach, even in poor weather, isn't that bad. The toughest thing would be figuring out the autopilot controls, but the truth is, if you can disconnect it (and usually that's really simple), you should be able to hand fly the plane safely.

You set up your approach early, get on your airspeed, and fly down the glideslope. You might even get a greaser out of it.  Smile

Steve


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