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Sonic Cruiser News  
User currently offlineMarc Kobaissi From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 119 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1258 times:


With the added concerns of high speed flight and increasing security risks after 9-11, I'm betting Boeing will re-introduce the flight engineer on the Sonic Cruiser. Other requirements for this involve the high workload associated with varible-geometry inlets necessary for supersonic flight, which this aircraft will undoubtedly be capable of in the future.

The current pace of technology amazes me. Read any issue of Popular Mechanics or Popular Science, and you'll learn that we are on the edge of numerous other airliner breakthroughs, such as hover-gear (landing gear that uses hovercraft technology, reducing friction and weight...unfortunately limited to light aircraft right now) and external ailerons.


Los-a-Mike!


-Marc K.

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13256 posts, RR: 77
Reply 1, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1164 times:

Well Boeing have recently stated that a supersonic BSC is not planned, in any case, variable inlets would in all probability not be needed if it was, we would only be taking Mach 1.2 at the most here.
Any faster and you need a complete redesign, not just in the engines and airframe, but stuff like fuel systems and enviromental control systems.
Concorde's intakes don't start to operate until Mach 1.3
I doubt that E/O's will make a comeback, you could argue that many pilots are not systems engineers, which can cause problems when things go wrong and they have to devote themselves to flying the aircraft.
That A330 that did a deadstick landing in the Azores in August last year was a case in point, in this case would an E/O have seen the fuel starvation problem before it became critical?
Academic really, they are not coming back since they have been overtaken by technology.





User currently offlineDragogoalie From Australia, joined Oct 2001, 1220 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1132 times:

I'm not trying to be a pain, but thats not really Sonic Crusier news, its just a hunch...unless you read it somewhere else?

--dragogoalie-#88--



Formerly known as Jap. Srsly. AUSTRALIA: 2 days!
User currently offlineVoodoo From Niue, joined Mar 2001, 2104 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1095 times:

I don't think the first post was serious.
Just pulling SC fans legs.
Flight engineer...p-hah! There's a money-loser for the airlines if ever there was one.
`Popular Science/Mechanics indicating breakthroughs'. P-hah. If I believed 1960s and 1970s issues of those magazines and the breakthoughs promised...we'd all be flying around in our own personal hovercars by now.



` Yeaah! Baade 152! Trabi of the Sky! '
User currently offlineJiml1126 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1085 times:

At least 15 airlines has show their commitment to Sonic cruiser once again, according to Flight International.

User currently offlineMarc Kobaissi From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 119 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1059 times:


Voodoo: I'm afraid, sir, you are incorrect. I personally own a small hovercar which I use for fun (not very functional for everyday use) and hover landing gear is currently in development at Dowty Aerospace...a rumour, but an interesting one nonetheless.


Los-a-Mike!


-Marc K


User currently offlineVoodoo From Niue, joined Mar 2001, 2104 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1036 times:

I can see this thread can only get funnier.

Sorry Marc, we are talking apples/oranges. In the `60s/`70s hover cars were `soon' going to allow us to commute at 500 mph up to 10,000 feet high etc bla bla. As to hover landing gear for airliners, its a micro-niche market at best. Those magazines have been citing research by well-known companies for years. Fine. But, like most concept cars they rarely amount to much.

Jiml1126, re: Flight Int'l and the SC, they also quoted one airline warning that Boeing is [wrongly] basing all their figures on premium fares ([a la Concorde but without the govt.bail out able to be factored in]). And unlike the 777, Boeing said there will -not- be the same `Working Together' philosophy because the airlines are much more competitive in this niche area.
And only 15 airlines interested so far? More were interested in a) Concorde and b) the Boeing 2707 when they were further from taking to the air.



` Yeaah! Baade 152! Trabi of the Sky! '
User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1662 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1016 times:

I think that Mark is somewhat correct about the supersonic capabilities of the BSC but not about the flight engineer. I have posted several links in the past on these forums regarding very knowledgeable speculation that the BSC is going to be a Mach 1.2 to 1.3 aircraft. I'm too lazy today to post the links again but the key to it is that the transonic speed range requires that the A/C be capable of supersonic flight and is a particularly troublesome speed range to design for, anyhow. There is no particular problem in making the BSC cruise at Mach 1.3 and it requires no exotic construction materials like the Concorde.

User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13256 posts, RR: 77
Reply 8, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 974 times:

What exotic materials on Concorde?
Mostly Aluminuim, with some stainless steel (wing leading edges) and titainium for some engine components.
The B2707 would have had titainium for the most part, due to it's planned Mach 2.7 cruising speed.



User currently offlineMarc Kobaissi From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 119 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 903 times:


All good thoughts....thanks for the input. Hopefully the Hover Gear and external aileron technology will take off and make the Sonic Cruiser the best Boeing ever.

Los-a-Mike!


- Marc K


User currently offlineMetalBird From Portugal, joined Mar 2002, 29 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (12 years 8 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 838 times:

Just a reality check my friends!

What happens when a plane with a overcraft undercarriage lands in a runway with high cross winds? It is blown out of the runway!!!
Or how to stop a heavy plane in the runway without the braking power of the wheels. (runway overrun the only option!)
Maybe a arresting hook, like in the aircraft carriers, that should be interesting to see!!!


I know that there is a russian small experimental plane wich uses overcraft landing gear but its to take off from lakes or rivers.

MetalBird


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