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Can An A330-200 Make Toulouse-Syd?  
User currently offlineTsentsan From Singapore, joined Jan 2002, 2016 posts, RR: 15
Posted (12 years 2 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1869 times:

Hi guys,

It's been rumoured (or rather stated) that the first QF A330-200 will do a special world record flight from Toulouse to Sydney non-stop.. Just wondering if an A330-200 is able to do this or issit simply stretching the limit?

Thanks
Tsentsan


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23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineN175dz From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2000, 274 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (12 years 2 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1848 times:

With no (or very few) passengers and crew and no cargo - it might be possible? How far is it?

cheers, Phil.


User currently offlineTsentsan From Singapore, joined Jan 2002, 2016 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (12 years 2 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1829 times:

I'm not sure of the code for Toulouse, so I used CDG instead.. from CDG it is 9148nm...


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User currently offlineSabena 690 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1764 times:

Maybe with heavy heavy weight restrictions.

Without weight restrictions certainly not.

-Frederic


User currently offlineNWA742 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1758 times:

The A330-200's maximum range is 6650nm.

I take it they will start from CDG instead of Toulouse, and as mentioned above that is around 9148nm.

Will maximum weight restrictions set, will that be able to make a difference of 2500nm?

Something tells me in my mind that it won't.

What's the deal here?


NWA742


User currently offlineFlight Level From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1758 times:



This is 10,691 miles. The A330-200's range is 6400 nautical miles. It cannot make that trip.


User currently offlineB20XX From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 39 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1737 times:

TLS-SYD (10,691 mi) seems to be a bit much even with zero payload, but it may be feasible. However it would not set a record, the current world record for a commercial airliner is 12,455 miles, set by a B777-200ER flying SEA-KUL eastbound.

User currently offlineN175dz From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2000, 274 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1725 times:

maybe (if it is possible!) it would be a record for an A330?

User currently offlineN79969 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1705 times:

I read that Boeing flew an empty 747SP on a delivery flight SEA-JNB non-stop. How long was that flight?

User currently offlineFlight Level From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1667 times:



SEA-JNB is 10,263 miles.

The range of a 747SP is 13,720 KM with is 8,525 miles.


User currently offlineGerardo From Spain, joined May 2000, 3481 posts, RR: 31
Reply 10, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1666 times:

Well, FWIW, an A342 once flew Paris-Auckland-Paris, with no pax of course.

The max. ranges stated for any aircraft are always with full pax (typical seating) and baggage, fuel reserves and no cargo.

According to Airbus' website, an A332 (233t MTOW) could do something around 9000 nm with zero payload.



Toulouse-Sydney is 9290 nm (great circle path). Could be very close. Perhaps with additional fuel tanks.

Rgds
Gerardo





dominguez(dash)online(dot)ch ... Pushing the limits of my equipment
User currently offlineMr.BA From Singapore, joined Sep 2000, 3423 posts, RR: 22
Reply 11, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1597 times:

I doubt Qantas will install extra fuel tanks on the A332 just for this flight. The map everyone shows the path curved. What about going straight all the way?


Boeing747 万岁!
User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4537 posts, RR: 41
Reply 12, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1590 times:

Mr.BA - The map is actually showing the shortest distance - it is going straight all the way. Remember, the Earth is pretty much spherical (not perfectly, of course). A rectangular map distorts the proportions of this sphere, and consequently what is really a straight line looks curved. Conversely, a straight line on a rectangular map would be a curved path in reality. If you don't believe me, find a globe, get a piece of string, and connect the two points on the map with the least possible string (i.e. pull tight). You will see the path of the string pretty much replicates that shown on the map.

Hope this helps

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineCointyro From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 62 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1584 times:

To answer the "go straight all the way" comment - you have to remember that maps (as displayed above) are already greatly distored with regard to size - especially towards the north and south poles. You have to distort a map that purports to show the entire globe in a rectangle. Thus, the shortest distance between two points on the 3-dimensional globe is a "straight" line (of course, curving around the curvature of the earth) - but this same route appears curved when mapped to a distorted map such as the rectangular examples above.

More on this phemenon at the Great Circle Route Mapper at http://gc.kls2.com. According to the FAQ section at http://gc.kls2.com/faq.html#$misc, "What is a great circle path?
A great circle path is the shortest path on the surface of a sphere between two points on that sphere. Technically, the term geodesic path should be used in this page since Earth is not a true sphere, but the great circle terminology is common usage. "

Hope this helps!


User currently offlineMr.BA From Singapore, joined Sep 2000, 3423 posts, RR: 22
Reply 14, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1546 times:

Ok guys thanks so much for the help i didn't know! Thanks again. But I really wonder how is it going make it.


Boeing747 万岁!
User currently offlineQatarAirways From Qatar, joined Sep 2008, 0 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1533 times:

From the map showing the Great Circle route it looks that if the A330-200 ever does this it will have Tail winds on its side. Also can't extra fuel tanks be place in the main deck in place of some Y seats. I know that these main-deck auxiliry fuel tanks can be installed/removed easily and the Y-seats won't take much time to re-install.
Also, does the A330-200 have the same fuel system as the A319CJ?. If it does than extra fuel tanks which look like cargo containers can be installed in the cargo deck and then removed when the aircraft arrives in SYD.


User currently offlineAio86 From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 928 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1510 times:

When Air Mauritius had its 767-200s delivered, they flew a route of SEA-Newfoundland-Mauritius. Newfoundland to Mauritius is a very long journey, it set a record for the 762, but I'm not sure about in general. What is the point of risking a brand new airplane, or wasting money on adding extra fuel tanks, if the plane can easily make an hour stop in hundreds of locations along the way. Are they really trying to prove they can do it, or is that just an assumption we made here? Remember, this is the same Qantas that had its employees pull by hand a 747 to set a world record, hmmm...

-aio86


User currently offlineGerardo From Spain, joined May 2000, 3481 posts, RR: 31
Reply 17, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1498 times:

Aio86: "Remember, this is the same Qantas that had its employees pull by hand a 747 to set a world record, hmmm..."

I didn't know this story. Could you tell me a bit more?

TIA

Gerardo



dominguez(dash)online(dot)ch ... Pushing the limits of my equipment
User currently offlineZK-NBT From New Zealand, joined Oct 2000, 5298 posts, RR: 11
Reply 18, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1487 times:

Aio86 are you talking about the 744 that did LHR-SYD non-stop? If you are the aircraft was actually towed to the runway!!!

User currently offlineTsentsan From Singapore, joined Jan 2002, 2016 posts, RR: 15
Reply 19, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1477 times:

There was once on an episode of Guiness Records on TV, that 1 person had pulled a QF B747-438 Wunala Dreaming using his own body strength over some distance (not sure if it was his teeth or not)....


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User currently offlineMexicana757 From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 3033 posts, RR: 29
Reply 20, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1458 times:

hmmm they might deliver that A330 like boeing did with the 717s to Hawaiian Air. Maybe.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

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User currently offlineSkystar From Australia, joined Jan 2000, 1363 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1447 times:

I would say it is possible under the right conditions.

Remember, the distance will most likely be less than 9000odd nautical miles, as the wind will be from behind the aircraft, generally speaking. Notice how SIN-Europe is generally an hour or so longer than Europe-SIN?

Air miles are what count, not ground miles.

Cheers,

Justin


User currently offlineThe Coachman From Australia, joined Apr 2001, 1426 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1367 times:

B777 can't make it unless it's for delivery.

B777 too big for QF domestic operations.

Good deal from Airbus because of A380 order.

3 reasons why they didn't buy the B777, well 2, but the first points is just a clarification.



M88, 722, 732, 733, 734, 73G, 73H, 742, 743, 744, 752, 762, 763, 772, 773, 77W, 320, 332, 333, 345, 388, DH8, SF3 - want
User currently offlineMyself From Belgium, joined Feb 2001, 207 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (12 years 2 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1366 times:

Very correct about the ground and air distance :

Ground Distance can be 9.200 nm, but if flying with an average tail wind component you might end up with an air distance that is well below the max range (respecting minimum reserve fuel requirements).

An in-flight reclearance near the end of the flight might also help a bit.



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