Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Where Did NWA Get There DC-9's  
User currently offlineBoeing777311 From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 126 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2022 times:

I was looking on the Boeing website and it shows that nwa ordered no DC-9's new from Douglas yet they have such a large fleet of them. Where did they all come from?

thanks

24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePhilB From Ireland, joined May 1999, 2915 posts, RR: 13
Reply 1, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2013 times:

Republic, Alitalia, SAS, to name a few

User currently offlineThomas_Jaeger From Switzerland, joined Apr 2002, 2393 posts, RR: 28
Reply 2, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2000 times:

some of them are ex-Swissair ships


Swiss aviation news junkie living all over the place
User currently offlineGr8SlvrFlt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1607 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1983 times:

A large number came from Eastern. They still carry Eastern registrations.

User currently offlineTimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6867 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1979 times:

Until they merged Republic in-- 1986? Northwest had no DC-9s, did they?

User currently offlineBR715-A1-30 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1958 times:

N8979E is one of the examples of Eastern Ships. Check this. When you see a DC9 with NWA, If it has one of the BIG Galley Doors instead of the usual small one, Then you know it is an Eastern Ship. Eastern ordered their -30s with Bigger galley doors than standard DC9s have. Look for Registration N922RW and you will see what I am talking about.. Also, look at N8979E

User currently offlineGr8SlvrFlt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1607 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1918 times:

Timz,
Correct. Northwest, along with National, operated no twin-jets until they bought out Republic. At the time of deregulation, American, TWA and Continental had disposed of their twins (1-11s and DC-9s) so they, too, used the 727 as their smallest jet.


User currently offlineCschleic From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 1261 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1875 times:

Republic had a large DC-9 fleet, in turn from its creation following mergers of Hughes Airwest, North Central, and Southern wasn't it? DC-9's were the majority in all of their fleets.

User currently offlineJmc1975 From Israel, joined Sep 2000, 3294 posts, RR: 15
Reply 8, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1833 times:

They bought them at a swap meet in the mid-80's. They got 'em for like $1.95 a piece.


.......
User currently offlineTravatl From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 2173 posts, RR: 7
Reply 9, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1813 times:

BR715-A130 - Eastern's DC9s didn't have larger galley doors. (As evidenced in the pics below).


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Frank Schaefer




View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Royal S King




View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Frank Schaefer



Gr8SlvrFlt - Actually TWA operated DC9s until the American merger...Continental operated them until two years ago, and American never operated the DC9 (only the Super 80).

As for the post topic, yep NWA inherited Republic's DC9s, and then scooped up the vast majority of Eastern's DC9 fleet in the early nineties.

Travis



User currently offlineMaiznblu_757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5112 posts, RR: 50
Reply 10, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1811 times:

Its safe to say my hometown airport (KTVC) has seen all the NW DC9-50's. NC/RC/NW from 1970-present, under all the colors. NW still carries the 'NC' in the majority of the -50 srs.

User currently offlineSccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5555 posts, RR: 28
Reply 11, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1774 times:

Yep, CO had gotten rid of its 9's, but when Texas Air's Texas International acquired the failing Continental in 1982-83, operations were consolidated under the Continental name, and the TI DC-9 fleet was re-liveried in CO colors. See below, one of the interim colorschemes, essentially TI colrs with CO title (note the big TI star on the tail).


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Bruce Highland




...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently offlineDL_Mech From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 1968 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1743 times:

Actually, the large door -9's were ordered by "the top banana in the west"

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © AirNikon




This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
User currently offlineDL_Mech From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 1968 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1736 times:

I just checked Bill Harms' website and the large door -9's did originally carry EAL regs......Br715-A1-30 was correct.


This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
User currently offlineGr8SlvrFlt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1607 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1719 times:

Travatl,
Nope, Eastern's DC-9-31s did have forward galley doors considerably larger than the DC-9-51s and most other carriers' DC-9-30s. The pictures you posted do show the larger door. For comparison, here is a -10 with the small door and a -30 with the larger one:
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Don Boyd
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Brian Peters

The top edge of the smaller door is at the same level as the top of the cabin windows. I'm sure the caterers and cleaners really appreciated the difference! One exception is the three -31s inherited from Caribair: they had the smaller doors (as well as rear airstars):
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Bob Beach

TWA had sold its original DC-9-10s in the seventies but started again when Ozark was absorbed. Same with Continental; they sold their -10s in the seventies but later inherited nines from Texas International and New York Air. American did not have nines but they did have 1-11s, sold in the seventies. BTW, Braniff also sold off their twin-jet fleet (1-11s) in the seventies (maybe earlier) and concentrated on 727s until Braniff II took over Florida Express in the eighties.


User currently offlineTravatl From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 2173 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1686 times:

Well cut off my legs, and call me shorty...it's back to airplane school for me. I stand corrected.

Travis


User currently offlineBR715-A1-30 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1675 times:

It's all right Travis, We are all wrong sometimes. I'll still ask you for advice when it comes to flying my favorite airline...AirTran

User currently offlineFlygga From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1662 times:

"Correct. Northwest, along with National, operated no twin-jets until they bought out Republic. "

Actually this statement is incorrect. Northwest had ordered it's own 757's prior to the Republic merger. N501US was delivered to Northwest Orient in Feb 85. The Repbulic merger was not until 1986.



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ted Quackenbush



Richard Silagi


User currently offlineGr8SlvrFlt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1607 posts, RR: 10
Reply 18, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1654 times:

Sorry, make that first generation narrow-body short-haul twinjets.

User currently offlineNwa757300 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 299 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1643 times:

The NW DC-9s with the large galley doors have plug-hatch emergency exits in the tailcone instead of the pressure bulkhead doors like the one below.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Michael Carter



I couldn't find a plug-hatch picture but they are similar to window exits. The DC-9s with the plug-hatches do not have air-stairs in the tail.


User currently offlineDutchjet From Netherlands, joined Oct 2000, 7864 posts, RR: 57
Reply 20, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1606 times:

North Central + Southern = Republic......all big DC9 operators, North Central was the biggest customer for the DC9-50. Southern had -10s and -30s, most of which were second hand from a variety of sources.

Republic then merged with (bought) Hughes Airwest, which also had a variety of DC9s, some of which were second hand from the major airlines. Hughes Airwest was itself a combination of other small west coast carriers, including Bonanza, Pacific Coastal, and others.

Republic + Northwest Orient = NORTHWEST. Northwest took the DC9 fleet and aggressively added to it, picking up many examples from failed Eastern Airlines as well as Alitalia, SAS, and a handful from other airlines on a one by one basis. NW recently updated the DC9-30/40/50 fleet, with hush kits, technical improvements and new MD90 type interiors and plans to fly these workhorses for many more years to come.

Lets not discuss what NW will replace the DC9 with, we seem to do date every week in this forum!


User currently offlineContinental From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5519 posts, RR: 18
Reply 21, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1590 times:

Hmm, interesting information, I never knew all that. BTW Maiznblu_757 is Boeing757fan! Welcome back!  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Continental


User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1580 times:

Some of the oldest DC-9s NW flies are some of the 10 series that were part of Southern's fleet; in fact, they are the oldest ones still flying in passenger service.

User currently offlineIflewrepublic From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 537 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1566 times:

The oldest DC-9's in the fleet did not come from Southern Airways. They, in fact, came from Bonanza Airlines, which was one of the predecessors to Hughes Airwest. The DC-9-10's with an "N" number ending in "L" were originally delivered to Bonanza in the 1960's...and they've been kept in meticulous condition since.

Iflewrepublic.



Aviation is proof that, given the will, we have the capacity to achieve the impossible.
User currently offlineExnonrev From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 621 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 1546 times:

Currently the oldest of the NW Nines is N930RC (msn 45729/ln 16 ex-N946L), delivered to Bonanza on January 16, 1966. Ship 9140 began life as one of only three DC-9-11s built. The -11 had an MTOW of 77,500 lbs, which met the old FAA rule for a two man crew. When the 80,000 lb limit was lifted in early 1965, Douglas offered an upgrade to -14 standard to customers with -11s on order. Bonanza was the only one to keep the -11s as is.

All three (N945L, N946L, and N947L) were converted to -14s by Air West in 1969. 9140 (re-registered N930RC by Republic after spending a few years with Finnair) is the last of BZ's original three still at NW. As of her last SDR filing in April 2001, 9140 had 69,201 hours and 96,589 cycles. With an average of around 2,000 cycles per year, 9140 should be reaching NWA's 100,000 cycle retirement limit by the end of this year.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Where Did Gatwick Get Its Name From? posted Mon Oct 23 2006 13:28:17 by 8herveg
Croatian Pm In Washington, How Did He Get There? posted Wed Oct 18 2006 03:49:54 by Mig21UMD
What Routes Did UA Fly There DC-8 On In The 80's posted Sat Oct 7 2006 23:29:35 by 747400sp
How Did IB Get There A319's To MIA? posted Mon Nov 8 2004 19:36:20 by MADtoCAE
Where Did Boeing Get The 7_7 Idea From? posted Tue Sep 14 2004 01:03:19 by RobK
Where Did You Get You ATPL/CPL IR? posted Tue Jul 13 2004 17:32:10 by Ts-ior
Where Did BA Get The GE-powered A319s And A320s? posted Fri Dec 19 2003 22:02:53 by Thrust
Where Did Airlines Get Their Codes? posted Tue Sep 16 2003 02:14:55 by Aa757first
Article About NWA And There DC-9s posted Fri Apr 4 2003 07:45:41 by I LOVE EWR
Where Did Southwest Get These Planes? (1991) posted Sat Jan 19 2002 18:32:25 by Twa902fly