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Wich Aircraft Was Never Involved In An Accident?  
User currently offlineJgore From Argentina, joined Feb 2002, 550 posts, RR: 2
Posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2105 times:

Anyone knows if there's any aircraft out there that was never involved in an accident or incident?

Thanks

jgore  Smile


22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFlagshipAZ From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 3419 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2089 times:

If you mean in a case where the aircraft wasn't written off, or had an injured passenger...two comes to mind. The 717 & the 777. Regards.


"Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." --Ben Franklin
User currently offlineCOboeing777 From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 693 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2082 times:

All the ones that are still flying  Smile

Actually, are you talking about aircraft types that have never had a fatal crash or ones that have never been in some kind of incident. I dont think any aircraft can claim the latter. However, there have yet to be any fatal crashes of a 777. I hope it stays that way too.


User currently offlineJgore From Argentina, joined Feb 2002, 550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2079 times:

Accident=Crash ; Incident=Mechanical,Operations,Technical,Emergencies,Etc.Nothing regarding passengers.

jgore  Smile


User currently offlineAviatsiya.ru From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2026 times:

The Il-86, Il-96, Tu-204 and Tu-214 all come to mind.

User currently offlineLubcha132 From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 2776 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2019 times:

A318
737-900 maybe?
757-300 tho i think there was a Condor incident.


User currently offlineIMissPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6278 posts, RR: 34
Reply 6, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2018 times:

That would, of course, be the Starr Bumblebee. There really is no airliner that has not had an incident.


Quit calling an airport ramp "Tarmac" and a taxiway "runway".
User currently offlineSpacepope From Vatican City, joined Dec 1999, 2899 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1999 times:

Aeroflot lost an IL-86 a few months back in Dubai. No injuries, but the pilots evidently forgot to lower the landing gear. The A-340 has never had an operational hull loss, although 2 have been written off in hangar fires and gun battles. 3 A-330's have been written off without fatalities, plus one that was lost in testing. A-319 and A-321 have spotless records so far. On the boeing side, the 737NG, 717, 753, 764, and 777 have no hull losses. The 717 does have an "incident" though, as a TWA bird landed without the nosegear. It was repaired and put back in service fairly quickly.

T.J.



The last of the famous international playboys
User currently offlineBells From Singapore, joined Nov 2001, 157 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1961 times:

I think the BA 777 involved in the refuelling fire at Denver was written off.

Am I wrong?


User currently offlineBig777jet From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1943 times:

I checked aircraft census information. The British Airways 777-236ER MSN 28840 of G-VIIK was damaged wing on Sept 6th 2001. I don't know if they repaired to return in service. Can anyone tell me if you saw still active G-VIIK somewhere today?

Thanks,

Big777jet








User currently offlineTsentsan From Singapore, joined Jan 2002, 2016 posts, RR: 15
Reply 10, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1929 times:

If the date and rego is correct


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Then the aircraft is back in service.



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User currently offlineAstrojet From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 565 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1928 times:

If I´m not wrong the Mercure fleet had no accidents.

User currently offlinePUnmuth@VIE From Austria, joined Aug 2000, 4163 posts, RR: 54
Reply 12, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 1891 times:

The Fairchild Dornier 728 ??  Big thumbs up
Peter



-
User currently offlineMidEx717 From United States of America, joined May 2002, 132 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 1851 times:

The 328 Jet has never had a accident or I have never heard of airline to have a accident.

Tim


User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 1846 times:

No 737NG has been involved in an accident.

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29791 posts, RR: 58
Reply 15, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 1825 times:

The Funk:


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And this is probably the aircraft type with the longest type record.

I don't belive that any AD where ever issued on the airframe either.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineD-AIQC From Germany, joined Apr 2002, 24 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (12 years 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1700 times:

What happend to the A-330, that was lost in test?
thnx



d-aiqc
User currently offlineRA-85154 From Netherlands, joined Sep 2001, 618 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (12 years 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1682 times:

I am not sure if versions are ok, but off all the Boeing's 747 I can not think of a hull loss or accident involving a Boeing 747SP?

User currently offlineBrons2 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3007 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (12 years 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1676 times:

Date: 30 JUN 1994
Time: 17.41
Type: Airbus A.330-321
Operator: Airbus Industrie
Registration: F-WWKH
C/n: 042
Year built: 1993
Total airframe hrs: 360 hours
Engines: 2 Pratt & Whitney PW4164
Crew: 3 fatalities / 3 on board
Passengers: 4 fatalities / 4 on board
Total: 7 fatalities / 7 on board
Location: Toulouse-Blagnac Airport (TLS) (France)
Phase: Take-off
Nature: Test
Departure airport: Toulouse-Blagnac Airport (TLS)
Destination airport: Toulouse-Blagnac Airport (TLS)
Flightnumber: 129
Remarks:
The test flight was part of the preparation required for the certification of the Pratt & Whitney equipped Airbus A.330 autopilot to Cat. III standards (approach and go-around under very bad visibility conditions). The first part of the test flight was completed successfully when the aircraft landed on runway 15L. A 180deg turn was made for a runway 33R takeoff. The second takeoff was to be performed under conditions similar to those of the first takeoff. For this test however, the autopilot would incorporate the modification under study (Spatiaal with Bubble in 3972 state). The aircraft weighed 147,700kg and a centre of gravity of 42%. The takeoff was performed by the co-pilot with TOGA (takeoff Go Around) power, instead of Flex 49 (a lower power setting). Rotation was positive and pitch input was stopped when the attitude changed from 12deg to 18deg nose-up. Within 5 seconds after takeoff several attempts were to engage the autopilot were unsuccessful. After it was engaged, activation was delayed by 2 sec because the 1st officer was exerting a slight nose down input on the side stick. The aircraft, still trimmed at 2.2deg nose-up pitched up to reach 29deg and the speed had decreased to 145kts. The captain meanwhile reduced thrust on the no.1 engine to idle and cut off the hydraulic system in accordance with the flight test order. Immediately after it activated, the autopilot switched to altitude acquisition mode (altitude had been set at 2000ft on the previous flight phase). This caused the pitch attitude to increase to 32deg in an attempt to reach 2000ft. The speed decreased further to 100kts (minimum control speed=118ts!). Roll control was lost and the captain reduced no.2 engine thrust to idle to recover symmetry on the roll axis. Bank and pitch attitudes had reached 112deg left and -43deg resp. before the pilot managed to regain control. It was however too late to avoid ground impact at a pitch attitude of around -15deg. PROBABLE CAUSES: "At the present stage of its work, the commission estimates that the accident can be explained by a combination of several factors none of which, taken separately, would have led to an accident. The initial causes are primarily related to the type of the test and its execution by the crew during the last takeoff: 1) choice of maximum power (TOGA) instead of Flex 49; 2) very aft CG for the last takeoff; 3} trim set in the takeoff range, but in too high a nose-up position; 4) selected altitude of 2000ft; 5) imprecise and late definition of the test to be conducted and the tasks to be performed by the captain and first officer, respectively; 6) positive and very rapid rotation executed by the first officer; 7) the captain was busy with the test operations to be performed immediately after take off (engagement of the autopilot, reduce thrust on the engine and cut off the blue hydraulic system) which temporarily placed him outside the control loop; 8) in addition the absence of pitch attitude protection in the autopilot altitude acquisition mode played a significant role. The following is also contributed to the accident: 1) The inability of the crew to identify the mode in which the autopilot was placed; 2) the confidence of the crew in the expected reactions of the aircraft; 3) the late reaction from the flight test engineer when faced with a potentially hazardous change in parameters (speed in particular); 4) the time taken by the captain to react to an abnormal situation."

Source: (also check out sources used for every accident)
S183 + S184; FI 10-16.8.94(6); AW&ST 11.07.94(26-27) + 3.4.95(72-73) + 10.4.95(60) + 17.04.95(44-45) + 15.05,95(58-59) + 22.05.95(54,56) + 29.05.95(69-70); TT + Ceefax; ASW 23.01.95(4)



Firings, if well done, are good for employee morale.
User currently offlineVulindlela From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 474 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (12 years 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1646 times:

I saw BA777 G-VIIK at ATL 2 weeks ago, so it is still flying Big grin


"If you take everything I've accomplished in my entire life and condense it down into 1 day, it looks decent!"
User currently offlineAviatsiya.ru From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (12 years 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1631 times:

Aeroflot lost an IL-86 a few months back in Dubai. No injuries, but the pilots evidently forgot to lower the landing gear.

They didn't exactly lose it. A decision was made by Aeroflot headquarters that the cost of salvaging the aircraft didn't warrant the expense, especially seeing as they were retiring the aircraft from their fleet in the near future.

Not an accident, but an incident.


User currently offlineAirsicknessbag From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 4723 posts, RR: 34
Reply 21, posted (12 years 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1627 times:

I personally count families, not single types. So, on my "no write off"-list, 717, 753, 764, 737NG, 319, 321 don´t show up because "family members" were written off. But that´s of course a matter of personal preference.

The majority of airliner types with spotless records were very scarcely built:

Mercure - 12
Tu 234 - 2
Tu 334 - 1
IL 96 - 16
Tu 204 - 36
So I guess the 777 with roughly 400 built is the only airliner which is around in substantial numbers without having been written off so far.

Other types mentioned in this thread:
IL 86 - in addition to the already listed accident in Dubai last September, another one was destroyed by a crashing 737 in Delhi in 1994.

747SP - a LAM had an uncontained engine failure in 1998 which resulted in a successful emergency landing but caused the plane to be damaged beyond repair.

Another interesting bit of information: there were no fatal crashes of a 737-100. There was only one economical write off after a hard landing of a COPA in 1993 in Panama City.

Daniel Smile



User currently offlineArsenal@LHR From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 7792 posts, RR: 20
Reply 22, posted (12 years 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 1576 times:
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Add the A340 to the list, one AF A340 was destroyed by fire, and an Sri Lankan was damaged by tamil tigers. But no accidents in commercial service.



In Arsene we trust!!
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