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FUN Airplane Facts!  
User currently offlinePropilot83 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 598 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 57911 times:

These are some fun facts about Boeing Commercial jetliners.

1. The Boeing 747 (all versions) have traveled an estimated 35 billion statute miles, that is the equavilent of 75,000 trips to the moon and back.

2. The Boeing 767 sucks in enough air during take-off in both of its engines to fill the Goodyear Glimpse in 7 seconds.

3. It took 75,000 engineer drawings to build the first Boeing 747-100.

4. The Boeing 737 is the most popular twin aisle - twin engine jetliner in the world, more than 3,000 have been sold from Boeing, and it has carried the entire world population of 6 billion people and it has traveled more than 25 billion miles.

5. You can fit 45 mid size automobiles on only one wing of a Boeing 747-400.

6. There are approximately 200,000 flights every day around the world.

7. There are 24,000 Boeing 777 flights each month.

8. There are 800 Boeing 777 flights each day.

9. You can fit 6 million golf balls inside of a Boeing 757 freighter.

10. One wind shield or window frame of the Boeing 747-400's cockpit, cost as much as a BMW.

Do you have any interesting fun facts about airplanes?

Sim Pilot,
Mostafa

33 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAirontario From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 551 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 57143 times:

I also read somewhere that the engines of the 777 are the same width as the 727

User currently offlineH. Simpson From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 949 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 57090 times:

Number 6,9 and 10 really amaze me, others I have probably heard them somewhere befire... Thanks Propilot83!

Airontario, the engines of the 777 is almost the same width of a 727, also the same is true to a 737 because the nose of 727 and 737 are basiclly the same.


User currently offlineAirOne From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 609 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 57062 times:

Airontario-

You read that in Airways magazine in the article about the retirement of American's 727's.

AirOne


User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2179 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 57047 times:

Yep, the 737 fuselage fits inside ONE of the GE90s  Big thumbs up


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Allan Rossmore



BA777


User currently offlineZobatc From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 89 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 57047 times:

Here's some facts about the KC-135...


The average passenger car would operate for more than a year on the amount of fuel transferred through the air refueling boom on a Boeing KC-135R Stratotanker in one minute. The fuel system in a Boeing KC-135R is a highly-integrated and interconnected network of fuel lines and nylon fuel cells. The system contains 50 valves and 14 pumps to guide the fuel flow and pass tons of fuel in minutes for aerial refueling work. The total fuel carried on a single flight of a KC-135R Stratotanker would be enough to last an average driver 53 years. Fuel cells in the Boeing KC-135R are made of nylon fabric less than one-sixteenth of an inch thick. A fuel cell weighing 80 pounds will hold seven tons of fuel.

Enough material is contained in the tires of a KC-135 jet tanker-transport's landing gear (eight main gear wheels and two nose wheels) to produce 100 automobile tires.

At 500 m.p.h., each of the four General Electric turbo fan engines on the KC-135R develops 22,000 lbs of thrust, the equivalent of 80 automobile V-8 engines rated at 200 horsepower each. To lubricate its four jet engines, the KC-135R carries a 60-gallon oil supply--enough for 50 cars. The electrical power generated on a single four-jet KC-135R tanker is sufficient to supply all the power needs for 35 average U.S. homes.

The cargo area in the Boeing KC-135R will easily hold a bowling alley with plenty of room left over for a gallery of rooters. The cargo area is almost 11 feet wide, 86 and half feet long, and seven feet high. It would take over 220 average car trunks to equal this space.

During aerial refueling at about 600 miles per hour, the boom operator in the tail of the KC-135R is only 20 feet above the nose of a Boeing B-52 Bomber.

There are 700 electronic tubes in the electronics system of the KC-135R or approximately the number needed to build 50 television sets. The heat generated by these tubes would heat an average five room home. These tubes range in size from sub-miniature one inch in length and one-quarter inch in diameter to tubes nearly a foot long with a five inch diameter.

The KC-135 contains almost 500,000 rivets, which range in cost from 14 cents to $1.50 installed.

Five thousand wires totaling 14 miles in length are needed in the electrical circuits of the KC-135R Stratotanker



User currently offlineLAX From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 2290 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 57026 times:

Quote >>> "The Boeing 737 is the most popular twin aisle - twin engine jetliner in the world...."

Twin-aisle?? Since when??  Confused


User currently offlineCrank From Canada, joined May 2001, 1559 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 57027 times:



I don't think the fuselage would fit in the engine, but it's close  Big grin


User currently offlineBrianhames From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 795 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 57014 times:

The Boeing 737 is the most popular twin aisle - twin engine jetliner in the world, more than 3,000 have been sold from Boeing, and it has carried the entire world population of 6 billion people and it has traveled more than 25 billion miles.


I didn't know the 737 was a twin aisle aircraft...


User currently offlineNightcruiser From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 1 month 4 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 56986 times:

How in the world is the 737 a twin-aisle aircraft? 'Cause if it was, then it would be considered as a widebody!

User currently offlineSabena 690 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 56964 times:

Great topic!!

Thanks,
Frederic


User currently offlineCovert From Ghana, joined Oct 2001, 1451 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 56878 times:

171st Air Refueling Wing, Pennsylvania Air National Guard, 146th Air Refueling Squadron, Ground Communications. The best part time job ever!!!! Long live the 135!!!!


thank goodness for TCAS !
User currently offlineCovert From Ghana, joined Oct 2001, 1451 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 56876 times:

By the way, those guys in that picture must have been really REALLY bored to start playing the old "will it fit" game like that.... just look at the amusement on their faces....


thank goodness for TCAS !
User currently offlineCovert From Ghana, joined Oct 2001, 1451 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 56875 times:

you can always put it on ebay


thank goodness for TCAS !
User currently offlineB727-200 From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 1051 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 56891 times:


Some other bits of useless information:

1) The original B747's had a centre of gravity problem, and balance issues when on the ground. Boeing found that if they added weight to the engine mounts, the problem could be corrected. The cheapest way of doing this was by filling the mounts with the very heavy and readily available uranium (spent, of course). Due to fears raised in the public forum during the Cold War, this was kept under raps for quite some time.

2) Boeing were skeptical about the strength of the fan blades on the newly developed high-bypass engines designed for the B747. To eliminate this fear, the engine manufacturer (GE I think) invited some Boeing engineers over for coffee and to inspect the blades. Story has it that when the gentlemen had finished their coffee, the host picked up the blade (which the Boeing reps were about to inspect) and smashed the coffee table in half with it. The blade was hardly scratched.

3) Boeing's original B747 test aircraft was designed to turn whilst taxiing by throttling up the engines on one side of the aircraft. This was later redesigned to have a steering mechanism in the undercarriage due to a press van being blown over during an initial taxi testing run. It was thought that it could be too unsafe around airports to turn using engine thrust.

4) Airbus had a massive logistics issue to solve the problem of getting the A380 fuselage sections to Toulouse for assembly. The sections are to be manufactured in Germany, and need to be transported to the assembly facility in Toulouse (similar to the A330/340 and A320 parts). The A380 sections are too big for the A330 transporters, and will be too big to barge along the canal system that runs through Toulouse. Airbus settled on a combination of sea and land to transport the parts, which should make interesting viewing on the highways of Southern France.

B727-200


User currently offlineDeltaRules From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3771 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 56825 times:

Got these off of an old Delta route map I found a couple years ago. I changed the wording around a little bit . Facts about the L-1011:

-There are (were) over 700,000 rivets, 580,000 fasteners, and 5,000 steel fasteners used in TriStar construction.

-Nearly a mile of hydraulic tubing carries fluid to activate the TriStar's flight controls, gear & doors, nose wheel steering, brakes, etc.

-14,000+ companies in 45 states & five countries participated in the TriStar building program.

-The electrical systems contained enough wire to stretch 100 miles (160 km) and is able to generate enough electricity to serve the needs of 170 single family homes.

I miss the L10s...
DeltaRules



Let's Kick the Tires & Light the Fires!!
User currently offlinePPGMD From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2453 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 56816 times:

Not sure where I got this but here is an air to air vid (it was used as a inside video of some sort for AA), it really gives you an idea of the 777, 757, and a 737 in formation and the respective sizes.

Please be considerate of my bandwidth and download it if you wish to view it multiple times.

http://www.lazyeights.net/aerial320.mov



At worst, you screw up and die.
User currently offlineATA L1011 From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 1384 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 56631 times:

Do you mean the A300 transporters I didnt know that they had A330 Transporters. Also 454 Mid size on th ewing of one 744 wow.


Treat others as you expect to be treated!
User currently offlineB727-200 From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 1051 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 56570 times:


Yes, the A300-600ST I meant. A typo I'm affraid.

B727-200.


User currently offlineIlikecrashes From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 31 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 56487 times:

737- not a twin aisle!

Anyway, I read somewhere that they shoot frozen chickens at the cockpit widows at 600 miles an hour.


User currently offlineYKM97Y From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 28 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 56299 times:

I saw that mentioned in Airways too (about the 777's engines being the size of the fuselage of the 727, meaning also the 707/737/757 since they use the same basic fuselage). Is this documented anywhere? Is there a site that lists the dimensions of the GE engines on the 777?

User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21462 posts, RR: 53
Reply 21, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 56250 times:

Zobatc: There are 700 electronic tubes in the electronics system of the KC-135R or approximately the number needed to build 50 television sets.

Interesting stuff all around... But this particular detail looks a lot as if the text is a little outdated. Modern TVs have exactly one vacuum tube - if any.

And I´m pretty sure that most of the electronics in the KC-135s will have been converted to transistors or even - gasp! - integrated circuits, by now.  Wink/being sarcastic Tubes are heavy and need huge amounts of electrical power.

One of the few remaining uses for vacuum tubes today is in some RF power amplifiers. Transistor electronics can even be made EMP resistant by now.


User currently offlineArsenal@LHR From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 7792 posts, RR: 19
Reply 22, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 56242 times:
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Wow!! Those facts are mind-boggling, extremely interesting.  Wow!

FACT: The maximum amount of fuel that a 767-400 can carry, is enough to fill 1,400 minivans!  Wow!




In Arsene we trust!!
User currently offlineCMK10 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 513 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 56224 times:

In 1987 American Airlines saved $50,000 by eliminating one olive from each first class salad.
DC-10's Forever



"Traveling light is the only way to fly" - Eric Clapton
User currently offlineArsenal@LHR From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 7792 posts, RR: 19
Reply 24, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 56236 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

2 other amazing facts:

A 777 has over 2.6 million lines of computer code written into it's flight systems software! this compared to 400,000 on the 747-400.

A 747 has around 150-175 miles of wiring in it!

Arsenal@LHR



In Arsene we trust!!
25 GDB : Some Concorde triva; Add together every pilot who's ever flown Concorde, and there still has been twice as many astronauts. Both BA and AF individuall
26 Superfly : 10. One wind shield or window frame of the Boeing 747-400's cockpit, cost as much as a BMW. Which one? BMWs vary in price ranging from $30,000 up to $
27 DC10Tony : I don't think the 737 fuselage will fit inside the GE90, here's why: The interior cabin width of the 737 is 11' 7", the fan diameter of the GE90 is li
28 Mandargb : Most sold aircraft To my knowledge is DC-3 Some 13000 pieces!
29 Post contains images Lt-AWACS : Oh what the hell I will join in: Our Radome on the E-3 produces its own lift while in the air. On some of our jets the rotodome sounds like whales mat
30 Darrell : Here is a completely useless piece of trivia. I don't recall where I heard it however. "There are currently more people livinq who were born before th
31 Post contains images BlatantEcho : the frozen chicken was lore, but started from facts. Someone was developing a crush resistant glass panel, possible for the Space Shuttle. Maybe a com
32 Cbqfan : 3. It took 75,000 engineer drawings to build the first Boeing 747-100. My favorite... Remember this was done in the days before CAD systems. All done
33 ClipperNo1 : 1) The original B747's had a centre of gravity problem, and balance issues when on the ground. Boeing found that if they added weight to the engine mo
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