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Why B- For China  
User currently offlineBanfield From Austria, joined Jul 2000, 23 posts, RR: 0
Posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1684 times:

Airliners have, depending in which country they are registrated, national registrations. But what for they are standing for?
E.g. N for US Airliners means something like national, D- for German Airliners means Deutschland (which is the German name for Germany), G- for UK Airliners maybe Great Britain.
But what means B- for Chinese Airliners, or HB- for swiss planes?

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineOH-LZA From Finland, joined Jun 2001, 1000 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1661 times:

Some registration country codes just are unlogical, I guess ICAO would be a better instance to answer this. Here are a few more examples:

9M- Malaysia
9V-Singapore
CS- Portugal
HS- Thailand
LN- Norway
OH- Finland
OK- Czech Republic
OY- Denmark
SP- Poland
SX- Greece
VH- Australia
VT- India
ZK- New Zealand
ZS- South Africa

Some additional logical ones:

C- Canada
F- France
I- Italy
OE- Austria (OE=Ö=first character of Austria's name in German, Österreich)

Alex


User currently offlineNa From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10645 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1646 times:

I know there´s a heritage for the country prefixes. But a random one. There´s no logic and in many cases no meaning behind the country prefix on regs. If so, why "5N-" for Nigeria, "9V-" for Singapore or "VH-" for Australia? And why has Brazil two prefixes, "PP-" and "PT-"?
"D-", "I-", or "F" are clear, but why has Spain "EC-" then, when logically "E-" would be more appropriate? And why has Britain a "G-", when "GB-" would make more sense.
I ask myself why these prefixes haven´t been changed to the one´s used for cars long time ago.


User currently offlineOH-LZA From Finland, joined Jun 2001, 1000 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1623 times:

I believe Brazil has two due to the large number of aircraft in the country.

Britain has G- due to the large number of aircraft in the country, so they wouldn't run out of registrations, like Brazil apparently did.

Alex


User currently offlineTurbulence From Spain, joined Nov 1999, 963 posts, RR: 21
Reply 4, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1623 times:

Well, I wouldn't bet.

Actually, as you say, some registrations seem to be "logical":

C-Canada
I-Italy
F-France
HA-Hungary
OE-Austria (The german name Österreich, being orthographically correct to add an "e" in substitution of a diaeresis: Oesterreich)
EC-Spain (the "e" for "España", the "c" for "civil")
TS-Tunisia
LX-Luxembourg

In Switzerland, maybe the H has something to do with "Helvetia", the name of the country being "Confédération Helvetique" in French. Since it has a Federal kind of administrative distribution, maybe the B stands for some kind of "Bundes-whatever", which is the german word for federal.

But then, what about:?

CS-Portugal
CN-Morocco
SX-Greece
OO-Belgium
PH-Netherlands
OY-Denmark
OH-Finland
PP- and also PT-Brazil
RA-Russia (former soviet countries), except UR-Ukrainia
OK-Czek Republic
9H-Malta
RU-Egypt
VH-Australia

I assume that given some logical two letter combinations, the number of possibilities is quite reduced, thus just giving "free" combinations of two letters or one letter+one number, but I am just speculating. Nevertheless, I assume that two digit combinations are not enough for giving each country a "logical" abbreviation.

Best turbulences


User currently offlineAztec01 From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 147 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1612 times:

HB-Hibernia (Switzerland) poss?

User currently offlineSwissgabe From Switzerland, joined Jan 2000, 5266 posts, RR: 33
Reply 6, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1602 times:

Hibernia, what's this?

To be honest, well, I think the H is for Helvetia but I'm not sure about the B.

China, why they have B, well, maybe because the C has already been taken  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

I don't they that most of them do even have a logic. Especially the once with numbers don't have one. 4R for Sri Lanka, 9V for Singapore etc...



Smooth as silk - Royal Orchid Service /// Suid-Afrikaanse Lugdiens - Springbok
User currently offlineOH-LZA From Finland, joined Jun 2001, 1000 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1588 times:

Turbulence,

Also these CIS countries have their own registrations:

4K- Azerbaijan
ES- Estonia
EZ- Turkmenistan
LY- Lithuania
UK- Uzbekistan
YL- Latvia

Alex


User currently offlineNa From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10645 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1584 times:

OH-LZA,
if that would be right, the US should have at least a dozen different prefixes...


User currently offlineKlik From Canada, joined Oct 2000, 152 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1587 times:

Hibernia has nothing to do with Switzerland..... it's the name of a major oil field in Newfoundland (Canada). Switzerland's official title is neither French, German, Italian nor Rumantsch, but latin: Confederatio Helvetica... Helvetica being the ancient name of the present area of switzerland.

On a separate note, I remember reading once that some countries' registration codes are the initials of aviation pioneers from the country.



User currently offlineGreenjet From Ireland, joined Aug 2001, 951 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1569 times:

Hibernia was also what the Romans called Ireland. Just to stay on topic the EI code which Irish aircraft bear is because in Irish the country is called Eire.

User currently offlineLapper From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 1563 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1573 times:

if that would be right, the US should have at least a dozen different prefixes...

Not neccessarily. The US registrations are N followed by numbers followed by letters, usually the carriers 2 letter code for the majors. Therefore it is possible that you can have N695AA and N695UA. The possibilities are virtually unlimited.

(Please correct me if I'm wrong)


User currently offlineTurbulence From Spain, joined Nov 1999, 963 posts, RR: 21
Reply 12, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1558 times:

OK, OH-LZA, I assume they are progressively getting rid of the RA- registration, which otherwise is logical. At an end, only Russia should remain with RA-, being normal each country having an own code.

BTW, Na, do not mix Country (=independent politically and administrative state with frontiers and political personality) with State (=administrative unit of a federally organized country, like Brazil, USA, Germany -although they call them "Land" in singular or "Länder" in plural- etc)

California, Massachussets, Iowa, Ohio, Oregon, New Mexico, Washington, Illinois, Florida, etc., are not comparable to "post-USSR" Azerbaitjan, Turkmenistan, Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, etc.

Best turbulences


User currently offlineLJ From Netherlands, joined Nov 1999, 4401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1530 times:

First, Brazil has 3 ICAO country codes (PP, PT and PR). As for the PH for The Netherlands. This probably is explainable. before "PH" the Dutch country code was H. However they changed it to "PH". The meaning of the "P" is open for debate. Either they used a "P" to point to Plesman (founder of KLM) or it's due to "Poste Hollande" (as explained by Flanor in a previous discussion).

Anyway it's my believe that the initial country codes have been determined around 1929 at an ICAN convention (as the ICAO didn't even exist at the time). Given the fact that aviation was dominated by the military and postal services I think that one of these two is the answer.


User currently offlineBoeing4ever From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 1482 times:

Can anyone explain why SP- is for Poland?

B4e-Forever New Frontiers


User currently offlineLZ-TLT From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 431 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 1420 times:

As for the US N-codes, they originate from the former Navy a/c registration system which was adopted by the civil authorities, thus the "N".

User currently offlineBackfire From Germany, joined Oct 2006, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 1416 times:

Use of the N registration, assuming the standard six-character identifier, theoretically gives you 676,000 aircraft IDs. That's about 50 times the total world airliner fleet.

Of course it also limits you to 1,000 aircraft if you maintain a fixed two-letter suffix identifying your airline. But since it's only American which is even close to that problem, it hardly matters. Besides it's easy to overcome; just extend the registration to a four-digit numerical section.

I'm off to get my life now.


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