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Shame! British Airways Overbooked Flight!  
User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6566 times:

Today, a Chinese national newspaper which is called People's Daily reported on its official web site that British Airways had overbooked its flight BA038 which did departure on 22 August, 2002 from Beijing (PEK), China's national capital.

Because the original was only in Chinese, I translated the main details into English and the story starts @ Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK). The author of the original Chinese report said in the article that he has been experienced the whole thing, but he was not a passenger on that flight and he said that he was going to the airport to say goodbye. BTW, all time mentioned below in Beijing local time.

On 22 August, 2002, in the morning, my friend was going to fly with Biritish Airways on flight BA038 to London. For this particular flight, check-in counters A15 to A20 were opened. However, not long after we got to check-in area, check-in officers told quite a lot of passengers who were holding confirmed British Airways flight tickets that no-one can fly on this flight, it's just simply because that British Airways had overbooked the flight and there were totally 68 passengers who were holding confirmed tickets, but can't go, because all seats had already been fully checked in for earlier passengers who were also holding confirmed tickets.

Since then, I saw two duty officers who wore British Airways' uniform, and they were busy to talk with other airlines duty managers in the check-in area and finally nearly 50 of those 68 passengers had been transfered onto other flights operated by Air China, KLM and a few other carriers. In fact, they were still lucky, because anyway they had gotten seats, but when I left the airport check-in area at 12:00pm, there were still almost 20 passengers and one officer who wore British Airways uniform simply told them that they cannot go at that day, but there wasn't any explaination from British Airways officers.

So, the article finalized with author's doubts -- Why did British Airways overbooked its flight for another 68 extra passengers? Why did no-one from British Airways give any explaination until now about the bad experiences which all those 68 people had in Beijing Capital International Airport? The article also said that if British Airways doesn't takecare its customers in China, the future will prove that this kind of carriers will have no market in China's airline industry.

54 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBA DC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2001, 145 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6530 times:

Most airlines overbook their flights, its simply to ensure that flights are full regardless of last minute cancellations. 68 overbooked is very high though!! At LHR T4 you will usually be handed a letter saying if you fly on the next available flight you will be given £200 or so.

Overbooking is nothing new or outrageous.


User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6516 times:

BA DC-10, I know that overbooking is often used by airlines, but don't you think 68 overbooked passengers are quite unreasonable and unacceptable?

User currently offlineAirblue From San Marino, joined May 2001, 1825 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6509 times:

Overbooking is a common sistem to ensure a full flights.
Also some no-frills carriers like Easyjet uses to overbook some flights.
In any case here in Europe if you are overbooked you could get a compensation between €75/€300.



User currently offlineRick767 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 2662 posts, RR: 51
Reply 4, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6495 times:

Basically all British Airways flights are overbooked. They use a careful monitoring system to analyse the number of passengers who simply do not turn up for their flight (more than you would think). The system generates percentage no-shows for each route, each day of the week and even takes special consideration for different times of year like Easter and Christmas (when there will be fewer no-shows).

Normally of course, this poses no problem. The flight operates fairly full, and BA have sold say 350 tickets for a flight which only holds and carrys 300.

Sometimes of course, the system doesn't get it quite right, and most if not all people show up for their flight. In this case the overbooked passegners must be transferred onto other flights etc.. and compensation usually always results.

I think almost the same system is used by scheduled carriers all over the world.



I used to love the smell of Jet-A in the morning...
User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6496 times:

If you think 68 overbooked is bad, you really ought to look at some of the loads on the India-UK-USA runs at peak season. Overbooking profiles of +400 are not unusual. My rule of thumb for non-revving there is that if the booked load is under 750 (on a 435 seater), you can probably get on without a problem.

User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6482 times:

Airblue, thanks a lot. As what I said, I do understand why do airlines overbooking its flights, but the case happened in Beijing was very bad. Does British Airways need to overbook 68 passengers to ensure the flight would be full? Of course, the answer is NO.

Also, after they found the flight had been overbooked, British Airways airport officers said almost nothing to those 68 passengers, instead the ground services operators (I'm not sure which ground services company does British Airways choose in Beijing, but anyway there are only two companies -- Air China Ground Services & Beijing Ground Services) apologised for British Airways to those 68 people, is this fair? The check-in officers had done nothing wrong, but they had to sincerely apologise and do all explainations to those overbooked passengers.


User currently offlineCanadi>nBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6475 times:

Yes, overbooking happens every day, but the BA numbers ARE rather high.
I am rather surprised BA offered no compensation to those pax left behind?
Take note: ALWAYS pre-reserve a seat prior to check-in. I am sure all those bumped from the BA flight (and others) had no pre-reserved seat assignment.

My best personal overbooking incident happened in January of this year. I was scheduled (with seat assignments) on Air Canada - YYZ-YVR-YYJ for a weekend getaway. The flight was overbooked by 26 pax, and AC gate agents were asking for volunteers to give up their seats, receive compensation, and be placed on the next available AC flight. As I had payed a travel industry reduced fare of CAD$125.00, I knew I would definitely not qualify for compensation, BUT, the AC gate agents were all young, and frazzled! So, I decided to give it a shot. The agent failed to see my industry reduced fare, and made out an MCO for CAD$300.00, plus, she upgraded me to Executive class for the direct YYZ-YYJ flight! Awesome! Not only did I now pay nothing to get to Victoria for the weekend, I now had the moola to apply to a Feb YYZ-CPH flight, in addition to THAT reduced fare!

Thanks, Air Canada!!  Smile/happy/getting dizzy


User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6468 times:

Thanks for everyone's comments earlier.

I've just heard something from my friend who was in the airport check-in area at that day. She told me that in the case happened in Beijing, there are two things which cannot be accepted by most of those 68 passengers.

1. They think the number of overbooked passengers reached the point of 68 which is too high, and it is quite unacceptable.

2. They were mostly 'pissed off' (sorry for using this words) by the way British Airways officers did to solve the problem, almost no explainations, no basic assistance, being un-friendly to them etc.


User currently offlineBigo747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6422 times:

Carnoc, I don't think it's a shame for BA. Air China should be feel ashame.

Why does BA flight always overbooked and not CA?


User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6420 times:

By the way, the female friend I mentioned in the last reply, she is working for Air China as an officer of general ground services in Beijing Capital International Airport.

Also, she told me that a lot of passengers on that flight were Chinese students who're studying in England and many of them are pretty young, she believes that they're just high school students.


User currently offlineEugdog From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2001, 518 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6420 times:

my experience is that when an aircraft is overbooked it is a scramble to be a volunteer to be bumped -why? becausse the compensation is so generous. On a flight from ORD to PHX - it was overbooked so they put me on the next flight in first class (3 hours later) and gave me a $400 voucher. What more could I ask for. I was one of the lucky ones who check in sooner!!!!!!!

Easyjet offered £50 in cash, a free return ticket and booking on the next flight the following day . That was pretty good as well - but no meals or other hospitality was offered!


User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6388 times:

Bigo747, you have to understand that British Airways is one of most well-known carriers worldwide and people have been push the airline in a position where people trust the company and also believe that the airline offers world's best services and products (comparing to other airlines) to its passengers, but the fact is that many people do not agree with it and I do also not think British Airways is as good as Cathay Pacific Airways, Singapore Airlines and a few others etc.

But, Air China (CA), it is true that this airline is the national flag carrier of China, but everyone knows that Air China faces a lot of problems on their services and products, but also no-one can really deny that Air China is trying very hard to catch up with other world class carriers, but it takes a period, maybe a few years or perhaps even a decade. Additionally, you have to realise that the disadvantages what does Air China have today are not all causing by the company, there are a lot of other factors we need to consider in this issue.

On the other hand, the past figures showed that Air China is now the most passenger and cargo carring carrier in China's three large airline groups. In fact, according to my personal experiences, I also think Air China offers better services and products than other China-based airlines. Seriously, if Air China wants, it can accept overbookings, but a lot of Air China officers told me that they will not do so on most of its domestic and international routes, unless they need to do so.


User currently offlineBobcat From United States of America, joined Jun 2007, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6389 times:

Here's the original from the official Chinese propaganda
machine, a.k.a. People's Daily....



*** After a quick search through PD's archives, something interesting
came up... this is the SAME reporter who wrote a very
critical article against the US gov't, referring to the "pirate"
US spy plane that killed a "patriotic comrade" Chinese
fighter pilot and subsequently landed on Hainan Island...




_______________________________________________


Last updated at: (Beijing Time) Friday, August 23, 2002

BA Sold Extra Tickets Stranding Chinese Passengers

In the morning, August 22, Beijing Capital Airport, British Airways(BA)' BA038 flight which flies from Beijing to London sold extra 68 tickets, stranded dozens of Chinese passengers. Though these Chinese passengers had all their OK tickets from British Airways they could not board on Airways plane, a thing unheard-of the reporter personally witnessed at the airport.

In the morning, August 22, Beijing Capital Airport, British Airways' BA038 flight which flies from Beijing to London sold extra 68 tickets, stranded dozens of Chinese passengers. Though these Chinese passengers had all their OK tickets from British Airways they could not board on Airways plane, a thing unheard-of the reporter personally witnessed at the airport.

People began to queue up for getting boarding cards for BA038 flight in the early morning. But what is unexpected, counter serviceman said that the seats had already been occupied though some passengers had taken a long queue for more than an hour.

What is even more bewildered was that why there were no seats for those Chinese passengers who have got their Airways tickets confirmed and the shocking thing the serviceman said that the British Airways had sold 68 more tickets out to a profiteering purpose.

The plane should have taken off at 11:25 on the day Beijing time, but people with tickets on hand had to wait on the airport and heard not a word of explanation from the whole of British Airways staff at the airport. Passengers had to shuttle from those counters, hoping to get seats.

Eleven senior school students as passengers from Harbin had planned to go to London by a group, but they have to make a change of their plan to take to three different flights, some will fly via Helsinki, some via Switzerland.

Originally, they should arrive in London at 3:30 pm on August 22 local time, but now they are not sure when and how they will get to and meet in London.

Majority of these student passengers may arrive in London at midnight local time. Things seem all in a maze to them and many will fly for Britain on a study program. Moreover, this is their very first time to go abroad.

A mother of one of the students said, "I'm worrying what will happen because my son's ticket has been changed. This is his first time to go abroad and the plane may arrive at midnight, what's more, it will take one to two hours from London airport to the Cambridge University and his school is very far from the university."

When reporter left the airport at noon, some 20 passengers are still waiting there, they could not get the day's flight and have to try another day.

Under ordinary situation, OK tickets have been confirmed, but how come the British Airways sold 68 more tickets only for the company's gain?

The thing is all too clear that some passengers could not board on plane. While servicemen in the airport explained that except Air China, most of airlines ever sold extra tickets.

They thought that passengers may change idea, but this wrongdoing is totally irresponsible for passengers.

I have been on many air companies' flights abroad, but this is the first time I met such a detrimental situation at the expense of passengers. Since the American 9.11 incident, international aviation market has slackened, there are not many airlines like British Airways selling extra tickets at the school entry peak time.

More and more Chinese students would love to study in Britain, this will bring a great benefit to British Airways, but their irresponsible behavior makes it lose reputation for they just have their eyes on immediate interests at the expense of the customers.

Suppose this was in the US or European countries, instead of being in a developing country like China, what things would be like? I think, at least, British Airways have to think about complaints first, being otherwise castigated by media, or they would not dare sell extra tickets so wantonly and brazenly to harm their customers.

By PD Online Staff Li Yan




User currently offlineBobcat From United States of America, joined Jun 2007, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 6372 times:

I get the feeling that this reporter does not like "people from the West" very much?  Wow!

User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 6354 times:

Bobcat, thank you for your translated report, I believe that it actually just translated by that staff from People's Daily, because the author of original Chinese report was written by Hai Bo.

User currently offlineBobcat From United States of America, joined Jun 2007, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 6347 times:

I didn't translate anything, the article is in the English section of PD:

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/200208/23/eng20020823_101969.shtml


Okay, I just realized the articles were translated to English by the same PD editor, but written by two different Chinese reporters.... anyway, neither one seem to like Westerners very much...  Sad

I wonder if they realize how many people are bumped each day in the US alone... I don't mind being bumped at all, since "they give you cash, which is just as good as money"
(a little Aflac commercial joke).



User currently offlineBigo747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 6332 times:

Carnoc, if BA is a well-known airline, then why are you saying it's a shame for BA to overbook passengers?

Is it because that your comment above saying that you don't consider BA's service is in the equal level, compared to CX and SQ, so you think it's a shame?

Air China is not willing to overbook the flight is because they're afraid to argue with the travellers with "low-knowledge" of travelling. (This description is very cruel, but sadly, it's a fact, especially to Chinese)

The reason why Air China's service is not-so-good is because political stuff. Air China symbolize Chinese Government in a sense. Current Government in China is not willing to be open enough and very conservatitive. I think we have to wait until the new leader Hu Jing-Tao holds the power. At least Hu is younger, and is willing to tell his comrades at Air China that what should they do to become more modernize and the service is equal to those international ones.


User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 6317 times:

Sorry, I didn't mean you have translated the article, I was in a hurry and typed something wrong, I think.

The original report (in Chinese) written by Hai Bo and the editor was Dong Meng Jun, but People's Daily online English editor Li Yan did the translation and put the English report on the English version of People's Daily web site.

BTW, if British Airways staff apologised for overbooking or even mentioned about compensation, I will not really unhappy like today, but they almost said nothing, even not a sorry to those 68 passengers.


User currently offlineBigo747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 6282 times:

The translated articles give me an impression that "These reporters from China are ignorant". I'm doubting their motivation for this report.

People Daily is related to Chinese Government. Air China is related to Chinese Government. Their motivation is very clear.

They're just trying to bash the foreign airlines and trying to get these people flying their own airline.

Why don't they write a separate article about "What is overbooking"? I don't see any related articles on PD's site.

British Airways can be wrong, and they can do it better. And BA don't have to actually apologize. Why? Because BA has begun to process these overbooked ticket under or above the industry standard. That's equal to an apology.

What I saw from China is they only know how to "Criticize", and not willing to find out what's the truth and reason. I was laughing at those travellers in the "JAL incident", which passengers suing JAL for treating them like 2nd or 3rd-class citizens. I don't think these passengers deserves compensation. Funniest thing is that, even one of the passenger wrote a book about it, and literally bashing JAL. All they want is just Money. They don't care whether you're a first-class airlines or those cat-class airlines. All they want is money.

They have enough of "JAL incident". Now what? "BA incident"?


User currently offlineCarnoc From China, joined Oct 2001, 875 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 6270 times:

Bigo747, I used the word of shame, because it is disgraceful for British Airways to offer passengers that kind of services.

Firstly, I don't deny that airlines should be allowed to overbook their flights, but overbooking should be limited, the number of 68 is just unreasonable.

Secondly, the way of British Airways airport staff to solve the problem is not welcomed, at least they should apologise to those passengers, at least they should explain the situation to those passengers, at least they should give basic assistance to those passengers and at least they should know to serve every passenger equally.

Now, don't you think it is enough for me to say shame to British Airways?

BTW, there are some political stuff to do with the matter we discussed about Air China, but it is not all true. Also, I partly agree that some Chinese passengers have less knowledge about air travel, but Air China doesn't afraid to argue with them on the overbooking issue, because CAAC's regulation already legalised that Chinese airlines are allowed to overbook their flights.

For every single flights, airlines are allowed to overbook less than a max. of % (sorry, can't remember the actual percentage, I reckon something like 5%, but not for sure) of the number of its scheduled total useable passenger seats on that aircraft or something very similar.

Moreover, Air China is doing a good job at the moment and the management of Air China will try their best to ensure that Air China does a good job in the future too.


User currently offlineBigo747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 6239 times:

Carnoc, the reason why Air China is not willing to overbook the flights is because they're afraid to loose the passengers.

Travellers with less or medium knowledge of air travel will have the following reaction if they bought a ticket, but unable to fly Air China.

"I swear I'll never fly Air China again because they did so."

The over-booking limit is 5-10%. For a 777, BA can only overbook about 25-50 passengers. Before criticizing BA overbooked too much, FIRST, think about this: Why would BA overbook such number? It's Chinese' problem. Because Chinese always have this bad habit about flying, like they don't cancel their seat if they can't make it; or, they're just being late, they think it's the plane waiting for me, not me waiting for the plane.

And as I said, BA did everything that's under the industry standard. And for the airport staff, what if one of them does not work for BA?

You can say I'm praising and admires these airlines, but I have to tell you is that it's just simply a FACT.

Are you going to say it's their attitude towards Chinese is like, "because they're Chinese, so we can do everything what we want". No, no airline dare to do this. Who don't want passengers to fly them so they can get more revenue?

If BA is a shame, then I would rather see Air China as a shame.

at least they should know to serve every passenger equally.

Now, please tell me what's your definition of serve every passenger equally?

Chinese always have this attitude of "I feel like you don't treat me nice, so I'm considering you as not treating me equally". This is funny. If you're attitude didn't change at the first place, then you don't deserve to stand in a position to criticize the others.


Yes, it's a fact that Air China is trying their best. But according to my observation from my daily visit to CARNOC's Air China message board, I don't see any positive comments. All I saw not-so-positive comments. One of the comment I saw is:

the new Business Class seat is even worse than other airlines' Economy Class.


User currently offlineLJ From Netherlands, joined Nov 1999, 4420 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 6210 times:

I don't see the problem with overbooking. As long as they ask volunteers and provide the usual compensation (thus $$$$$$$).

Tomorrow my flight (BA8121 LGW-AMS) is either full or already in the plus (thus overbooked) as only to 2 C class fares are available for booking. One thing for sure, I'm ready to take up the denied boarding compensation (free night in London, EUR 150) but probably that won't happen as I never have the luck of ending up on an oversold flight.

BTW 68 isn't very strange. Have heard KLM sometimes sells 100 seats more on flights to Africa (notably Lagos) end still ends up with some empty seats (just for the record KLM uses an MD-11 with 300 seats to Lagos thus they sell 133% of the seats). It all comes down to yield management (and the fact that it's still cheaper to overbook than to fly with empty seats).

Regards
Laurens


User currently offlineCanadi>nBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 6193 times:

LJ, well said. There will always be the no-show factor, which is why it does make sense for carriers to overbook to a sensible degree. Where I do have a problem is when carriers are negligent in offering bumped pax applicable and fair compensation packages. And as I said, as long as you ensure you have a pre-assigned seat prior to check-in, your reservation should be fine, and you runa very low risk of being bumped from your flight.

Personally, I pray for overbookings, where (schedule permitting) I can volunteer and receive that nice compensation package. Gives me more time to stroll through an airport and/or watch take-offs and landings prior to my revised new flight time. I always LOL at the "mad scramble" of pax like me to the gate counter when volunteers are called for!  Smile/happy/getting dizzy


User currently offlineCapt.Picard From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (12 years 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 6176 times:

I'm also one of those who would love to be bumped off a flight, but never am (although I occasionally fly in J, so it's very unlikely in that case).

On a sidenote, 'flybe', a British regional carrier (formerly 'British European') has made it explicitly clear on its website that it intends to bring an end to overbooking, by the start of its winter timetable.

http://www.flybe.com/company/


25 RickB : I dont think BA have anything to be ashamed of - the overbooking figures are carefully worked out and in the vast majority of cases all passengers who
26 A380 : I think some posts went too far in this thread. Do we not criticize other airlines right here? Some people here seemed to have the attitude of 'Chines
27 Bigo747 : A380, I didn't say that Passengers does not have the rights to ask anything or thinks that "Chinese should not complain". Actually it's good to see Ch
28 AirFranceJFK : When you have a 30% no show factor (speaking from AF experience), you have no choice but to overbook. First Class is never overbooked, business can on
29 Tsentsan : On SIA, if you're on an overbooked flight, and you volunteer of offload, they'll compensate you SGD $500.
30 Carnoc : Thanks for all earlier replies. However, at least, there are two very unacceptable things inside the case happened in Beijing: 1. British Airways airp
31 Carnoc : Bigo747, do you really know what happened between Japan Airlines and Chinese passengers? Seriously, Japan Airlines (actually, mostly the ground servic
32 Jesseycy : I get why the reporter seems so annoyed/disappointed........ "except Air China, most of airlines ever sold extra tickets. " So does this means that Ai
33 Carnoc : Jesseycy, Air China does overbook its flights, but only on very few routes. Also, what do most Chinese airlines do is that all passengers who hold con
34 James768 : Overbooking happens, everywhere, everyday. I don't see why Beijing would be an exception. It's not a disgrace - and clearly the reporter had never bee
35 JAL : Airlines routinely overbook their flights to ensure that they are full so the British Airways case is not that uncommon.
36 Carnoc : James768 & JAL, no-one in here really mean that Beijing should be an exception for airlines overbokking their flights, but everyone who was there abso
37 Teva : For all those saying that people shoukd be happy and should volunteer because of the compensation, I would like to meke this little comment: What is t
38 DutchDeltaDude : Carnoc: don't you have something better to do then keep on posting the same Chinese anti-BA propaganda over and over again? Overbooking is nothing spe
39 GuyBetsy1 : Why the People's Daily in China posted that article is bewildering in the first place. Don't they have any other news to report? Overbooking is an eve
40 Bigo747 : Carnoc, Chinese will always think they're right, they did nothing wrong. And you can easily categorize those staff as a "racist" just by looking at th
41 Phxinterrupted : This is so lame that it isn't even worthy of the news. This BS happens every day and until governments (especially the US) hold airlines accountable,
42 Ual777contrail : phxinter,in all the flights i have ever worked as a gate agent i have rarely ever had to deny a passenger a ride due to NOBODY wanting to get off. any
43 Carnoc : Once again, I thank you for all past replies. But, the case in Beijing is certainly an uncommon one, it's not only because BA overbooked 68 passengers
44 Carnoc : GuyBetsy1, I'm sorry, but the past figures showed that British Airways is now already facing the position that other airlines start to get passengers
45 Ual777contrail : i know that when the flight is overbooked your name appears in the computer with a number next to it. the computer splits up the names based on how mu
46 Carnoc : Bigo747, I forgot to say that when something has happened like the situation those Chinese passengers had with Japan Airlines, why couldn't the airlin
47 Bigo747 : the case in Beijing is certainly an uncommon one The reason why you may think that the case is uncommon one is because this never happens in China bef
48 Carnoc : In fact, there are two different sites we can see from the whole thing. The problems I'm trying to say is that the way of BA Beijing airport staff to
49 Post contains images NonRevKing : Air China is not willing to overbook the flight is because they're afraid to argue with the travellers with "low-knowledge" of travelling. LOL...God,
50 Carnoc : Bigo747, you're right that I don't like the way some foreign airlines work and I also don't like the way some Chinese airlines work and I can tell you
51 Carnoc : Let's think this way. If BA airport staff move all Asians from back of queues to very front in check-in area at London International Airport without a
52 Bigo747 : Carnoc, with the example you give out, I highly doubted that the English people will think BA being "racist" to them. Sure they will complain. But the
53 Air Taiwan : Guys!~ Just spare Carnoc for god's sake! Yes all Chinese media (TV newspaper radio etc etc) are propaganda and almost always encourages anti-American/
54 Bigo747 : BA really didn't do enough to calm the passengers. This doesn't make any valid point for you to determine that they are "Racist and discriminating".
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