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3 AN-225 Mriya Questions  
User currently offline747-600X From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2795 posts, RR: 15
Posted (14 years 8 months 2 days ago) and read 3388 times:

1) How do you pronounce the name 'Mriya'?
2) It was built to support the Russian Space Shuttle, but it's got a huge belly - does it ever do anything but perform at air shows?
3) Since it does so many air shows - why not strap that essentially useless shuttle on the back and be even more impressive?

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"Mental health is reality at all cost." -- M. Scott Peck, 'The Road Less Traveled'
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (14 years 8 months 2 days ago) and read 3241 times:

Last I heard, this aircraft is no longer flying, lack of funds.

User currently offline747-600X From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (14 years 8 months 2 days ago) and read 3238 times:

I wonder - if they're 'lacking funds' just how much funding they'd want to take that little thing off their hands...


"Mental health is reality at all cost." -- M. Scott Peck, 'The Road Less Traveled'
User currently offlineCPDC10-30 From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2000, 4791 posts, RR: 23
Reply 3, posted (14 years 8 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3240 times:

Myria is Russian for "dream". It certainly is that in terms of technical accomplishment and capacity. Maybe Antonov could hook up with Boeing some day and get the airplane back in production - perhaps with better engines? Who knows.

Apparently on one of its first flights it took off from a 3,000 foot runway. Heck, it takes me 1/4 of that distance to take off in a 500 pound glider pulled behind a Super Cub.

I have seen one once at Trenton air force base (near Kingston, Ontario).


User currently offlineCMul From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (14 years 8 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3242 times:

I read some months ago on a site that purported to know, that the AN-225 was being scrapted for used parts. While a 1.3 million pound MTO weight was impressive, the cargo hull was not pressurized. Too expensive, I guess. Only one was built. The good news is the 777-300 now has the longest fuselage in the world. Although the C-5A and C-5B still are the longest overall aircraft.

Craig M.


User currently offline747-600X From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (14 years 8 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 3213 times:

Das ist neicht gut! If they scrap that thing I'll have a fit... I love the Mryia (is it MRYIA or MRIYA - if it's MRYIA, we need to tell Johan to change the pull-down menu). Anyway, you could still do a lot with that much space even without pressurization - in fact, most cargo that I know of wouldn't care about pressurization. A 767-300's fuselage, for example. If anyone knows anything about the fate, alleged or otherwise, of this big beauty, please let us know!

Thanks,

747-600X



"Mental health is reality at all cost." -- M. Scott Peck, 'The Road Less Traveled'
User currently offlineVH-OJO From Slovakia, joined Jan 2000, 238 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (14 years 8 months 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3209 times:

AN-225 has indeed been used for spares for AN-124s. Since no more than one had been build, it will never fly again. Last time I heard, the fuselage is parked at he Antonov test airport facility near Kiev, Ukraine. In 1989 I had a chance to visit this aircraft ,its huge cockpit and I almost ended up flying with it on the test flight. I thought I will have a chance to do that in the future and rather opted to take a flight on a AN-22 instead. Only more so I regret now that it did not happen, although the AN-22 was my best flying experience ever out of my hundreds of flights.

User currently offlineStarship From South Africa, joined Nov 1999, 1098 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (14 years 8 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3205 times:

This report comes from Flug Revue Online August 1998

------------------------------------------------------

ANTONOV AN-225: THE HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION
by Karl Schwarz
Almost ten years ago the hangar doors opened at Kiev for a true giant of the airways. On 30 November 1988 the An-225 Mrija (dream) was introduced to the amazed world for the first time. Only three weeks later the dream plane started to its maiden flight, which lasted 75 minutes. At the helm of this giant, whose mass surpassed any other aircraft that had been built before by almost 50 per cent, were Alexander Galunenko and Sergei Grbik.

The Mrija had been created in only three and a half years as part of the Sovijet space program. It had been chosen to transport the space shuttle Buran and parts of the Energija launcher. The existing Mjasischtschev VM-T were unable to do so. Apart from this, and according to the prevailing philisophie, the super plane was supposed to contribute to the fulfilment of the economical plans. It was for example meant to transport devices for oil exploration or power plants to the inhospitable expanses of Siberia.

In order to fulfil these tasks, the Antonov design bureau under the leadership of Pjotr Balabujew used the An-124 Ruslan, the then worldÕs heaviest aircraft, as the basis. The fuselage was lengthened by about 15 meters. This created enough room to fasten unusual loads onto its back. The manufacturer claims that containers measuring up to 70 meters in length and eight meters in diameter can be transported on its back. The weight can amount up to 250 tons! After thorough research the mounting points were fitted, so that 38 different loads could be taken on board without difficulty.

In order to secure Mrija's control when an external load is attached, two tails were moved to the tip of the tailplane. The span is 32.65 meters and thus bigger than that of the Boeing 737-300.

The thick wings of the An-124 with their supercritical profile were adopted for the An-225. However, a big middle section was inserted, to which two further Progress-D-18T turbofans have also been fitted. The thrust is thus increased to no less than 309,540 lbs.

The maximum take off weight, which is increased to 600 tons, is carried with two further pairs of tyres fitted to each side of the main undercarriage. The four at the rear are steerable, which allows the An-225 to be agile on the ground despite its size. Four wheels are sufficient for the front undercarriage, which is attached to the nose.

Apart from that Antonow used as much as possible the systems of the An-124, the APUs or the redundant fly-by-wire system. When the Mrija had its spectacular debut at the Parisian Aerosalon in June 1989, test pilot Alexander Galuenko was able to comment about flight characteristics, which are very similar to that of the Ruslan. The demonstration in Farnborough in 1990 confirmed the amazing agility of this giant.

After that things became quiet around the Mrija. When the Buran program was stopped after only one unmanned spaceflight, Mrija's primary function had gone. The disintegration of the Soviet Union did the rest - there simply was no need for the aircraft any more. The completed An-225 was finally returned to Antonov, and parked at Kiew. Since money was desperately short, it was even used to supply spares for engines.

If the British freight charter specialist Air Foyle has his way, the world's heaviest aircraft will soon be rescued. Market research has been carried out together wit Antonov, and one is currently trying to raise interest with potential users, in order to get the An-225 airborne once again.

Possibilities for deployment have already been found. Plenty of customers are to be found in the USA. According to Bruce Bird, Director of the Charter Division of Air Foyle, parts of launchers like the Delta and Atlas could be transported in the An-225. LockheedÕs planned Venture Star could be transported on its back. Additionally the Mrija could serve as a launch platform for the X-34B. Furthermore big sections of aircraft could be transported in it. The completely assembled fuselage of a Boeing 737 can be fitted in the hold.

According to Bird the super performance can be had a super price. Only 160 million US dollars are required to make the plane fit for flying again, to assemble a second aircraft with components that are already available, and to construct a third Mrija. This is only a little bit more than is needed for the purchase of just one Boeing 747, and less than the price of a C-17 Globemaster III.

Bird reckons, that the first Mrija can be airborne in about six months, once the investors have come forward. However, before it is ready for action, the test program for the Russian certification will have to be completed. One would need approx. 100 hours for this. It is envisaged, that a FAA-Certification will also be needed, if the aircraft is to be used in the USA. The assembly of the second An-225 will take about twelve months, the third will take two years.

It goes without saying that the Mrija will only be used for a very small segment of the cargo market, but just as with the An-124, the fact that it is available will guarantee a certain need. Since the Ruslans came onto the civilian freight market, these planes have transported many a strange load. They can cope with sailing yachts and locomotives.

The heaviest single load has up to now been a 124 ton (135.2 tons with its transport cradle) steam turbine by Siemens, which was transported from Düsseldorf to New Delhi in September 1993. In this way a tedious surface transport on bad roads could be avoided. A similar model went to Chile in January 1998.

The Ruslan is not used to its full capacity with 135 tons. In January 1991 for example, three transformers weighed in at 140 tons. They had to be transported quickly from Barcelona to New Caledonia, where an explosion in a nickel foundry had destroyed three transformers. Only by this speedy transport an extremely costly shutting down of the plant could be avoided.

Time plays an important part when the An-124 is being deployed. This also applies for her military customers. Even countries like France have fallen back on the Russian freighter, when it was needed in Africa. The An-124Õs basic rental price per flight hour (fuel, crew and maintenance), is between 6,000 to 8,000 US dollars.

From page 12 of FLUG REVUE 8/98


------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 1998 by Motor-Presse Stuttgart. All rights reserved.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Last updated July 13, 1998
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FLUG REVUE, Ubierstr. 83, 53173 Bonn, Germany
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Behind every "no" is a "yes"
User currently offlineN754PR From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (14 years 8 months 1 day ago) and read 3195 times:

I heard only one ever flew, i've seen photos of it taking off at JFK on a charter flight. I've also heard that a second aircraft was on the production line (never finished) and a third in the very early stages of construction.

Its a great shame that this aircarft will never fly again. I had the joy of seeing the ONLY AN-124 to fly to KAI TAK airport in Hong Kong (RA-82046). This aircraft has since run of the runway in Gander !.

I also saw three AN-124's parked side by side in the tiny Macau Int'l Airport !!.

May i ask VH-OJO how the hell you got a flight in a AN-22 ?????, you are one lucky guy !!.

Daryl


User currently offlineIlyushin96M From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2609 posts, RR: 12
Reply 9, posted (14 years 8 months 23 hours ago) and read 3196 times:

Why would any more AN225s be produced, since they were specifically designed and build to carry the Buran space shuttle?

FYI, Mriya is Ukrainian, not Russian, for Dream. Antonov is not a Russian aircraft manufacturer, but rather is Ukrainian, hence the Ukrainian name for the aircraft.


User currently offline747-600X From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 10, posted (14 years 8 months 22 hours ago) and read 3192 times:

And will someone please clear this up: Is it Mrija - with a 'J' now - or Mriya? (Thanks for the nationality Ilyushin!)


"Mental health is reality at all cost." -- M. Scott Peck, 'The Road Less Traveled'
User currently offlineStarship From South Africa, joined Nov 1999, 1098 posts, RR: 14
Reply 11, posted (14 years 8 months 16 hours ago) and read 3187 times:

My reference books all spell it with a "y" ie Mriya.


Behind every "no" is a "yes"
User currently offlineSlawko From Canada, joined May 1999, 3799 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (14 years 8 months 9 hours ago) and read 3180 times:

Thanks for clearing that up for everyone, I was amazed that someone else knew that it was Ukrainian and not Russian.

I hope that someone restores this airplane, even if it is just one. I had a chance to go to Ukraine this summer, but I was not sure which airport the Antonov design facility was located, does anyone know which one it is: Is it Kyiv Zhuliany UKKK, or Kyiv Boryspol UKBB or is it anotherone all together in the Kyiv area, does anyone have any info about this..........thanx



"Clive Beddoe says he favours competition, but his actions do not support that idea." Robert Milton - CEO Air Canada
User currently offlineRyaneverest From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (14 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3174 times:

As I know, the last alphabet in Cyrillic is a "left-side right" R, pronounced "ya". Languages written in Cyrillic alphabets are often "romanized" into Latin alphabets. This left-side right R is either translated as "ya" or "ja". But you will pronounce them the same.

That difference is the same as "Ilyushin" versus "Iljushin", "Tupolev" versus "Tupoljev" etc.


User currently offlineSkylinepigeon From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (14 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3163 times:

JP Airline Fleets 1999/2000 lists the AN-225 as stored at Kiev-Gostomel, which is also shown as the base of Antonov Airlines (ADB).

User currently offlineSlawko From Canada, joined May 1999, 3799 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (14 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3164 times:

Thanx for the info skylinepigeon, I will try to find it next time i am in Kyiv.


"Clive Beddoe says he favours competition, but his actions do not support that idea." Robert Milton - CEO Air Canada
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