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Boeing Ground Qantas And Virgin 738s  
User currently offlineAussie_ From Australia, joined Dec 2000, 1766 posts, RR: 5
Posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1630 times:

Due to a fault in the tail. Causing minor disruptions across the network (being Saturday, there are spare a/c around).

More news as it comes to hand.

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTsentsan From Singapore, joined Jan 2002, 2016 posts, RR: 15
Reply 1, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1616 times:

6x Qantas 737-800s, and 2x Virgin Blue 737-800s are affected.

All aircraft (except 1 QF) are expected in the air by lunch time, currently 1x QF and 1X DJ is back in service.




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User currently offlineAamd11 From UK - Wales, joined Nov 2001, 1061 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 1581 times:

WOW, this is strange. Was it Boeing who grounded the aircraft or the CAA[ or whatever the aviation authority down there is called]?
What is the actual "fault"?
does anyone know?

A^A MD-11


User currently offlineWirraway From Australia, joined Mar 2001, 1321 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 1541 times:

Qantas, Virgin ground planes
September 14, 2002

QANTAS and Virgin have been hit by a grounding order by Boeing on their 737-800 jets this morning.

Qantas spokesman Martin Sharp said the airline received notification overnight from the manufacturer.

"The order affects six of our jets, one is back in service, another four are expected to be back in the air by lunchtime and the sixth, which is in Townsville, will take a little longer," he said.

Virgin airlines was forced to ground two of its planes, airline spokesman David Huttner said.

"We got the order overnight, which affected two of our planes," he said.

"Boeing said they were concerned about a batch of these parts which are part of the plane's operating systems and we take the most conservative approach, which of course is replacement," he said.

"The part was replaced on one jet overnight and the other was flown to Melbourne for the replacement and will be back in the air by lunch time.

"There was some inconvenience for passengers flying from Sydney to Melbourne, but they understood it was a matter of safety first," he said.

AAP





User currently offlineBR715-A1-30 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 1528 times:

What was the part called, and what role did it have in-flight?

User currently offlineAamd11 From UK - Wales, joined Nov 2001, 1061 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 1516 times:

Something to do with the rudder perhaps?
the part being in the tail, it is possible it is rudder related.

Lets wait and see before we jump to [the wrong] conclusions.

Best Regards
A^A MD-11


User currently offlineWirraway From Australia, joined Mar 2001, 1321 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 1515 times:

from Bloomberg:

Boeing, the world's No. 1 planemaker, identified a potential fault with a back-up device for the flight-control hydraulic system of some of its 737 aircraft, Qantas spokesman Michael Sharp said in an interview.

Boeing spokeswoman Liz Verdier said the company discovered during flight tests that flight-control modules on some of its ``next-generation'' 737s were failing, and that a supplier had provided faulty parts in some cases.

The problem may affect about 60 of 1,300 737-600, 737-700, 737-800 and 737-900s in service worldwide, Verdier said. Operators should check to see if they have one of the parts identified by the supplier as potentially faulty and replace it if necessary, she said.

Wirraway



User currently offlineAamd11 From UK - Wales, joined Nov 2001, 1061 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (12 years 3 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 1443 times:

Not something to be taken likely then,
congrats to Boeing to identifying the problem,
shame that such problems do arise, but there is always soemthing that can go wrong, and this time it seems, it was found before something went horribly wrong.

A^A MD-11


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