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Passengers Who Need Oxygen  
User currently offlineStaggerwing From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 95 posts, RR: 1
Posted (12 years 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1356 times:

Since you cannot take compressed oxygen on a plane, how do people who need oxygen get it when flying? My grandfather just started using oxygen and we are trying to find out how he is allowed to traveling the future. When I worked for Vanguard, we didn't take passengers who were oxygen dependent because we didn't have the equipment necessary. On airlines that do take passengers who are oxygen dependent is there an extra charge?

Thanks

Staggerwing

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSearpqx From Netherlands, joined Jun 2000, 4344 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (12 years 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1351 times:

Yes there is a charge, and it has to be booked/confirmed in advance. I can't speak for other carriers, but at AS there can only be one oxygen request in the cabin at a time. You need to call the carrier's reservations directly and advise them you need to request oxygen.

Good luck
Duane



"The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity"
User currently offlineBizJets From France, joined Jun 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (12 years 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 1335 times:

Oooooooooooooh.

We had a passenger once who arrived at the airport and informed us at the counter that she would be requiring oxygen. She was also very drunk. Well, after telling her that she would definately not be able to travel today because of 1. her special needs and 2. her drunkeness, she proceeded to punch me in the chest. I had her escorted by the cops out of the terminal.

Yeah, you need to make a 24 hour reservation and there is only 1 allowed per flight.


User currently offlineLMML 14/32 From Malta, joined Jan 2001, 2565 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (12 years 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1315 times:

Not sure about how many O2 persons are allowed on the same flight but I'd hate to think that airlines charge extra for this. Certainly not the airline I work for.

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29832 posts, RR: 58
Reply 4, posted (12 years 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1311 times:

You can have O2 on a flight for a person who medically needs it.

I want to say that you are allowed to have 1 person on a bottle in the cabin but don't hold me to that.

But that is the reason why a reservation and advance notice to the airline is required. That way they don't try and book more then one person on the flight.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29832 posts, RR: 58
Reply 5, posted (12 years 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1299 times:

Here we go....The actual rules in the US.

For 135 operators.

§ 135.91 Oxygen for medical use by passengers.

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section, no certificate holder may allow the carriage or operation of equipment for the storage, generation or dispensing of medical oxygen unless the unit to be carried is constructed so that all valves, fittings, and gauges are protected from damage during that carriage or operation and unless the following conditions are met -

(1) The equipment must be -

(i) Of an approved type or in conformity with the manufacturing, packaging, marking, labeling, and maintenance requirements of Title 49 CFR Parts 171, 172, and 173, except § 173.24(a)(1);

{There is no part 173 - Ed.}

(ii) When owned by the certificate holder, maintained under the certificate holder’s approved maintenance program;

(iii) Free of flammable contaminants on all exterior surfaces; and

(iv) Appropriately secured.

(2) When the oxygen is stored in the form of a liquid, the equipment must have been under the certificate holder’s approved maintenance program since its purchase new or since the storage container was last purged.

(3) When the oxygen is stored in the form of a compressed gas as defined in Title 49 CFR 173.300(a) -

(i) When owned by the certificate holder, it must be maintained under its approved maintenance program; and

(ii) The pressure in any oxygen cylinder must not exceed the rated cylinder pressure.

(4) The pilot in command must be advised when the equipment is on board, and when it is intended to be used.

(5) The equipment must be stowed, and each person using the equipment must be seated, so as not to restrict access to or use of any required emergency or regular exit, or of the aisle in the passenger compartment.

(b) No person may smoke and no certificate holder may allow any person to smoke within 10 feet of oxygen storage and dispensing equipment carried under paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) No certificate holder may allow any person other than a person trained in the use of medical oxygen equipment to connect or disconnect oxygen bottles or any other ancillary component while any passenger is aboard the aircraft.

(d) Paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section does not apply when that equipment is furnished by a professional or medical emergency service for use on board an aircraft in a medical emergency when no other practical means of transportation (including any other properly equipped certificate holder) is reasonably available and the person carried under the medical emergency is accompanied by a person trained in the use of medical oxygen.

(e) Each certificate holder who, under the authority of paragraph (d) of this section, deviates from paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section under a medical emergency shall, within 10 days, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays, after the deviation, send to the certificate-holding district office a complete report of the operation involved, including a description of the deviation and the reasons for it.



If you are a Part 121 carrier. The same rules are pretty much reitterated...

§ 125.219 Oxygen for medical use by passengers.

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section, no certificate holder may allow the carriage or operation of equipment for the storage, generation or dispensing of medical oxygen unless the unit to be carried is constructed so that all valves, fittings, and gauges are protected from damage during that carriage or operation and unless the following conditions are met:

(1) The equipment must be -

(i) Of an approved type or in conformity with the manufacturing, packaging, marking, labeling, and maintenance requirements of Title 49 CFR Parts 171, 172, and 173, except § 173.24(a)(1); {There is no part 173 - Ed.}

(ii) When owned by the certificate holder, maintained under the certificate holder's approved maintenance program;

(iii) Free of flammable contaminants on all exterior surfaces; and

(iv) Appropriately secured.

(2) When the oxygen is stored in the form of a liquid, the equipment must have been under the certificate holder's approved maintenance program since its purchase new or since the storage container was last purged.

(3) When the oxygen is stored in the form of a compressed gas as defined in Title 49 CFR 173.300(a) -

(i) When owned by the certificate holder, it must be maintained under its approved maintenance program; and

(ii) The pressure in any oxygen cylinder must not exceed the rated cylinder pressure.

(4) The pilot in command must be advised when the equipment is on board and when it is intended to be used.

(5) The equipment must be stowed, and each person using the equipment must be seated so as not to restrict access to or use of any required emergency or regular exit or of the aisle in the passenger compartment.

(b) When oxygen is being used, no person may smoke and no certificate holder may allow any person to smoke within 10 feet of oxygen storage and dispensing equipment carried under paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) No certificate holder may allow any person other than a person trained in the use of medical oxygen equipment to connect or disconnect oxygen bottles or any other ancillary component while any passenger is aboard the airplane.

(d) Paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section does not apply when that equipment is furnished by a professional or medical emergency service for use on board an airplane in a medical emergency when no other practical means of transportation (including any other properly equipped certificate holder) is reasonably available and the person carried under the medical emergency is accompanied by a person trained in the use of medical oxygen.

(e) Each certificate holder who, under the authority of paragraph (d) of this section, deviates from paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section under a medical emergency shall, within 10 days, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays, after the deviation, send to the FAA Flight Standards district office charged with the overall inspection of the certificate holder a complete report of the operation involved, including a description of the deviation and the reasons for it.

§ 121.574 Oxygen for medical use by passengers.

(a) A certificate holder may allow a passenger to carry and operate equipment for the storage, generation, or dispensing of oxygen when the following conditions are met:

(1) The equipment is -

(i) Furnished by the certificate holder;

(ii) Of an approved type or is in conformity with the manufacturing, packaging, marking, labeling, and maintenance requirements of 49 CFR Parts 171, 172, and 173, except § 173.24(a)(1); {There is no part 173 - Ed.}

(iii) Maintained by the certificate holder in accordance with an approved maintenance program;

(iv) Free of flammable contaminants on all exterior surfaces;

(v) Capable of providing a minimum mass flow of oxygen to the user of four liters per minute;

(vi) Constructed so that all valves, fittings, and gauges are protected from damage; and

(vii) Appropriately secured.

(2) When the oxygen is stored in the form of a liquid, the equipment has been under the certificate holder’s approved maintenance program since its purchase new or since the storage container was last purged.

(3) When the oxygen is stored in the form of a compressed gas as defined in 49 CFR 173.300(a) -

(i) The equipment has been under the certificate holder’s approved maintenance program since its purchase new or since the last hydrostatic test of the storage cylinder; and

(ii) The pressure in any oxygen cylinder does not exceed the rated cylinder pressure.

(4) Each person using the equipment has a medical need to use it evidenced by a written statement to be kept in that person’s possession, signed by a licensed physician which specifies the maximum quantity of oxygen needed each hour and the maximum flow rate needed for the pressure altitude corresponding to the pressure in the cabin of the airplane under normal operating conditions. This paragraph does not apply to the carriage of oxygen in an airplane in which the only passengers carried are persons who may have a medical need for oxygen during flight, no more than one relative or other interested person for each of those persons, and medical attendants.

(5) When a physician’s statement is required by paragraph (a)(4) of this section, the total quantity of oxygen carried is equal to the maximum quantity of oxygen needed each hour, as specified in the physician’s statement, multiplied by the number of hours used to compute the amount of airplane fuel required by this part.

(6) The pilot in command is advised when the equipment is on board, and when it is intended to be used.

(7) The equipment is stowed, and each person using the equipment is seated, so as not to restrict access to or use of any required emergency, or regular exit or of the aisle in the passenger compartment.

(b) No person may, and no certificate holder may allow any person to, smoke within 10 feet of oxygen storage and dispensing equipment carried in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) No certificate holder may allow any person to connect or disconnect oxygen dispensing equipment, to or from a gaseous oxygen cylinder while any passenger is aboard the airplane.

(d) The requirements of this section do not apply to the carriage of supplemental or first aid oxygen and related equipment required by this chapter.




OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29832 posts, RR: 58
Reply 6, posted (12 years 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1296 times:

Ok. I now have a question....

Looking at 121.219 (C)

No certificate holder may allow any person other than a person trained in the use of medical oxygen equipment to connect or disconnect oxygen bottles or any other ancillary component while any passenger is aboard the airplane.

Compare with 121.574 (c)

No certificate holder may allow any person to connect or disconnect oxygen dispensing equipment, to or from a gaseous oxygen cylinder while any passenger is aboard the airplane.


Is it just me or do these two requirements contradict each other???

I don't have a written copy of 121 available to research further on it. The online copies at the FAA website, bug my eyes out after a while  Nuts

Anybody have any further comment on this.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29832 posts, RR: 58
Reply 7, posted (12 years 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1275 times:

Never mind....

I see that I misread 125.219 as 121.219.

Basicly a 125 and a 135 operator can allow the medical crew to change bottles while a 121 operator can not, so enough O2 has to be packed into the bottle for the entire flight.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineGr8slvrflt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1609 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (12 years 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1253 times:

Delta, for example, charges $75 per segment for oxygen service. Arrangements must be made in advance through reservations. A letter from a physician is also required and the request must be approved by Delta's medical department. The oxygen tank is pre-boarded by maintenance and is monitored inflight by the Flight Attendants.

User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13743 posts, RR: 61
Reply 9, posted (12 years 1 day ago) and read 1222 times:
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Actually, at AS there is no limitation on the number of passengers per cabin that may use supplemental oxygen.

They require 48 hour minimum advance notice, but in cases of life or death emergencies they'll do everything they can to arrange for oxygen to be available immediately.

The charge is $75.00USD per bottle, and the number of bottles used per segment will vary based on the customer's required flow rate.

The customer is required to use oxygen equipment furnished by the airline, and service is only available on AS-operated jet flights. No subcontractor flights (QX, 7H, KS, etc) can be accomodated with supplemental oxygen onboard.

The oxygen service is provided onboard the aircraft only; the customer must make their own arrangements for oxygen while connecting, etc. The customer is also required to furnish a letter from their physician authorizing them to travel by air using supplemental oxygen.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13743 posts, RR: 61
Reply 10, posted (12 years 1 day ago) and read 1217 times:
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By the way, the reason for the extra charge is to cover the extra expenses that go along with providing supplemental oxygen service.

Those costs include, but are not limited to:

Purchase of oxygen tanks, hoses and fittings.
Purchase of sterile masks and/or nasal canulas
Maintenance of oxygen tanks, hoses and fittings.
Storage of all equipment per the FARs.
Additional training for inflight personnel and agents on oxygen service.
Ferrying equipment to or from designated storage facilities at SEA, ANC, and LAX (a person needing oxygen on a PHX-SEA flight would require AS to ferry in the oxygen equipment from SEA prior to that flight).
Refilling depleted oxygen tanks after usage.
Administration and oversight of the aforementioned items.

There is a designated oxygen coordinator in SEA who works directly with the reservations Lead Agents, Line Maintenance and Ops to set up and arrange oxygen requests for all AS jet flights.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
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