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What Do Pilots Like More The....  
User currently offlineFlying_727 From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 435 posts, RR: 5
Posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1530 times:

...the Airbus sidestick of the Boeing Stearing column? I know both use fly-by-wire but which is easier for pilots to control? I personal think the fly-by-wire system would be easier if it used the column.

thanks
flying_727

19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTeahan From Germany, joined Nov 1999, 5293 posts, RR: 61
Reply 1, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1235 times:

Do I smell a Boeing vs Airbus post.
I hope not.

Jeremiah Teahan

PS. I do not know but great topic.



Goodbye SR-LX MD-11 / 6th of March 1991 to the 31st of October 2004
User currently offlineFlying_727 From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 435 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1217 times:

I just want to know what pilots feel is better to fly in means of control.

flying_727


User currently offlineDnalor From Australia, joined Mar 2000, 369 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 1217 times:

Apparently the Airbus has no feel built in a` all.

Boeings arent fly by wire as such, they have cable runs back to hydraulic valves which operate the control surfaces. BUT they do have systems and linkages that are devised to give back feel/force thru the controls, but this is created not actual.


User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5046 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1208 times:

A joystick is like playing a damn video game. Come On, Airbus guys. It is an airplane. The steering column-type has got to give you more of the feel of actually flying the thing. Which is why people want to be pilots - not to sit around with their joystick and paperwork.


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineRominato From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 268 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1199 times:

I have a friend who was just hired on by United from Skywest, and he had the option of flying either the 737 or an airbus (i forget which), andway, he chose the 737 because he said that for the one year probationary period, he'd rather go with an airplane with more "standard" controls. Now, I wouldn't go so far as to say he prefers boeing vs airbus, but rather, he thought it would be an easier transition to the major aircraft...

User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5046 posts, RR: 15
Reply 6, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1194 times:

Well, sure - if you can handle a stick you can certainly handle a little joystick

i'm just worried about the kids who are brought into the business as flight crew and trained from day 1 on the airbus systems....how would they react changing over to a conventional system??



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineAb.400 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1187 times:

The sidestick gives the pilots plenty more space for themself. Like first class versus coach class. That means alot if you fly day by day.

User currently offlineJaemz From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1181 times:

Fighter planes use joysticks too. What might be the reason for that?

User currently offlineCALPilot From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 998 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1181 times:

Well I fly Boeing for a living. The airplane handles great. But I cant stand looking around the control colum when my seat is back during cruise flight. I would love to have a side stick, and tray table to do my paper work...

User currently offlineHeffer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 1154 times:

Hi All!

I was just reading the Boeing B737-300 Flight Manuals, (One of several) and I saw that the B737, although it has F.B.W (Sort Of) IT HAS A FEEL COMPUTER. This computer gives the control column pressures.

I was recently flying the B737-300 Simulator (The real thing, not the M.S crap) and then the Airbus A320-200 Simulator, and I can tell you that in the Boeing, I could really tell when it was time to change a setting (E.G: Add/Remove Trim, Add/Remove Power, etc. etc.)

Heffer


User currently offlineHamlet69 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 2735 posts, RR: 58
Reply 11, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 1142 times:

Jaemz,
Besides the F-16, what other fighters have sidestick controls? I know the Falcon's is a sidestick bacause it allows the pilot's seat to be reclined further than on other fighters. This in turn allows the pilot to be able to cope better with higher Gs (not something a commercial pilot would ever have to deal with, I hope). Is that the same reason for other fighters? Does anybody know?

Hamlet69



Honor the warriors, not the war.
User currently offlineFdxmech From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3251 posts, RR: 34
Reply 12, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1137 times:

Regarding the 737-300 mentioned by heffer. In no way is this a fly by wire a/c. The "feel computer" actually called the elevator feel computer is a hydromechanical (not digital) device using stabilizer position and direct pitot pressure to impose progressively higher control forces with increasing airspeed. It has been around since at least the 727. I'm not sure about the 707 (i've never worked it). The only Boeing with primary flight controls using fbw is the mighty 777.


You're only as good as your last departure.
User currently offlineBoeing 777-400 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 128 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1133 times:

Wouldn't you think that not many people would be able to argue with this unless they have flown an Airbus or fighter jet?

User currently offlineDLMD-11 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 1126 times:

The reason (or at least one reason) that fighters have sticks, be they side-stick or center-sticks, rather than yokes, is because, if you have to eject from your plane, if there is a yoke in the way you end up with little below the groin, or below the knees if you are lucky, and walk around three feet tall afterward.

Without a yoke, you eliminate this one problem. Also, it gives you more 'give' in the manoeverability.

Also, because some of these fighters are notoriously unstable, such is the case with aircraft such as the B-2, you need computers to conpensate for the tendancies to be unstable.

Hope this clears something up!



DLMD-11.


User currently offlineA student From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 1096 times:

Flightstick versus real controls? Good Topic. I have several friends who fly (I don't) and they all think Sidesticks are a big joke. And, to be honest, just to imagine flying a plane WITH MY LEFT HAND ONLY, (Ok, so there's lots of buttons to press and thrust to control and so on, but with a sidestick, I guess, you do not have the option to use your right hand for steering), I feel worried.

Apart from that (which was just my opinion): Did you know that the A3XX cockpit will have a keyboard and a mouse in front of the pilot, as well as the sidestick on the side? The keyboard and mouse are of course not for steering, but for using the computers more efficiently, but still, isn't that strange? Someone might argue that that ain't flyin" any more.....


User currently offlineAb.400 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1097 times:

An Aircraft has to carry people and goods from A to B and today they do it faster, safer and cleaner than ever. And if that plane is easy and comfortable to operate, well that´s great. Jokes are not needed anymore.

User currently offlineWoodsboy From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 1029 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1084 times:

It depends what you learn on, its like Mac vs. IBM. Old school (well, not that old!) pilots of course prefer the traditional Boeing/MD layout and always argue about "feel" and such. Pilots who learn on Airbus aircraft may have the disadvantage of never flying a large aircraft the so-called traditional way, but lets face it, part of the reason for a reduced "feel" sidestick cockpit is so that an airline who really is thinking can have thier pilots fly an A-319 one day and an A-340 the next, very smart from a standpoint of crew cross-training. This allows an airline to have a wide capacity range (A-319s to A330/340) while keeping crews current in all thier a/c. Right now pilots making the transition from 737-400s (my experience is with Alaska Airlines) to the new 737-700s might as well be learning how to fly an MD-80, they are totally different in feel, power, layout etc. They are experiencing trouble with crews who are making the transition but not fast enough to crew the new a/c.

At any rate, there are arguements for both sides, neither likelt to win people from the other side!


User currently offlineCXA330-342 From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 398 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1083 times:

So what if a pilot can't "feel" the time to give trim. Wouldn't a really fine pilot instinctively know when to trim?

User currently offlineHeffer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1067 times:

Hi All!

Thanks for the correction 'Fdxmech'!!!

I was speaking to a friend of mine, (Who is a B737-300 Capt.) and he said that, unless it is Automatic, it would take a really really good pilot to know when to trim without being able to feel it... Even he, after 20 000 HRS can't even do it!!!

I was also thinking about a few things, if a pilot can feel things through the column, he knows what to change, but if he cannot, he must check instruments to see what needs to be changed... SOMETIMES, not being able to feel these things can cause pilot dis-orientation, and sometimes accidents... This was discussed in detail a few weeks ago...

Heffer

IN NO WAY DO I INTEND TO OFFEND ANYONE BY THE COMMENTS WITH-IN THIS POST.


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