Print from Airliners.net discussion forum
http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/military/read.main/148540/

Topic: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: MadameConcorde
Posted 2012-11-27 03:32:30 and read 4699 times.

Never would I think that a space suit weigh so much!

I happened to find this page on BBC Science - I think it is quite interesting so I want to share it with everybody here. You can get details about all the different parts of the Space suits used by the astronauts of the International Space Station.

Quote:
When Neil Armstrong set foot on the Moon's surface in 1969, he was wearing a space suit developed by the US company ILC Dover, which is based in Delaware.

read more:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20433089

  

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: redflyer
Posted 2012-11-27 12:01:48 and read 4608 times.

I generally appreciate the BBC because their reporting is far more factually correct than other news outlets. However, this is sloppy. To begin with the photos of the suit are reversed. Also, a human would perish in a second or two at most without protection, not minutes.

But beyond that, it's a good reminder of the requirements for a spacesuit. The newer concept ones that may eventually be used in the future are, well, futuristic looking. See link.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...photogalleries/spacesuit-pictures/

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: GST
Posted 2012-11-27 23:24:20 and read 4521 times.

Quoting redflyer (Reply 1):
Also, a human would perish in a second or two at most without protection, not minutes.

Is that really true? You won't last long, but I'd have thought it would be a good few seconds if you've taken a lungful of air first, have your eyes and mouth closed etc...


http://science.howstuffworks.com/question540.htm
It doesn't cite any sources so I'll have a better look for something when I get home if there is time.

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: redflyer
Posted 2012-11-28 08:36:07 and read 4450 times.

Quoting GST (Reply 2):
Is that really true? You won't last long, but I'd have thought it would be a good few seconds if you've taken a lungful of air first, have your eyes and mouth closed etc...

To be honest, I don't know the actual answer. The article you linked points out that a person would lose consciousness in as few as 15 seconds. But that is, I believe, referring to a situation where there is a lack of oxygen only. If there is no external pressure on the body, in a situation where the pressure is removed immediately, you would suffer a near instantaneous death. Of course, if pressure is lost rapidly, but not instantly, you would live as long as it took for the pressure to go from life-sustaining to zero-pressure.

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: BEG2IAH
Posted 2012-11-30 23:47:01 and read 4236 times.

Quoting redflyer (Reply 3):
Of course, if pressure is lost rapidly, but not instantly, you would live as long as it took for the pressure to go from life-sustaining to zero-pressure.

My understanding was analogous to the bad tasting coffee made when an aircraft is in flight. At lower pressure water boils at lower temperatures (hence bad coffee), much lower than 100 C you need at sea level. With no pressure, i.e., vacuum, water boils even below temperatures you would consider freezing at sea level. Losing consciousness is actually good, so if the space suit is breached, he or she doesn't experience instantaneous boiling of all bodily fluids. Yuck.

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: fridgmus
Posted 2012-12-02 21:35:32 and read 4068 times.

Also, the pressure suit that Felix Baumgartner used in his jump from the stratosphere is possibly a new design by the David Clarke Company out of Massachusetts, I think. I'm a little hazy on the details, but I'm almost positive that it's a big update on the larger and heavier pressure suits our U-2 and formerly our SR-71 pilots use and NASA is studying it for use in space. I don't have any pictures, but I've seen those pressure suits and they look a little larger and bulkier than Felix's suit. And the Redbull Stratos team is sharing all they've learned.

Not to mention that Felix's suit is also a hell of a lot more comfortable than the partial pressure suit that COL Joe Kittinger used in his stratospheric jump back in 1960!

Anyone please add to this and correct me if I'm wrong.

Thanks,

F

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: NoUFO
Posted 2012-12-03 06:45:29 and read 4013 times.

Quoting redflyer (Reply 1):
To begin with the photos of the suit are reversed.

I don't think they are.
The control module is on the left so astronauts can control it with their right hand. And the description is inverted because astronauts use a mirror to read it. The photos seem to correct.

Quoting redflyer (Reply 1):
Also, a human would perish in a second or two at most without protection, not minutes.

Sorry, but you seem to be wrong again.
Animal testing (how sad!) and human accidents (again: sad - but this time at least not criminal) have shown that humans can indeed survive exposure to vacuum conditions for a couple of minutes.
This is why EVAs are mostly done with two space-walkers who continuously communicate with each other. If one them doesn't respond or act suspiciously, the other one will come to re-pressurize his space suite. Hopefully early enough.

Edit: The upper torso of the suit with the control paneel plus the wrist miror can be seen here:
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreduc...esuits/home/clickable_suit_nf.html

[Edited 2012-12-03 07:04:52]

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: Areopagus
Posted 2012-12-03 15:37:17 and read 3953 times.

Quoting fridgmus (Reply 5):
Not to mention that Felix's suit is also a hell of a lot more comfortable than the partial pressure suit that COL Joe Kittinger used in his stratospheric jump back in 1960!

Kittinger wore a full pressure suit. But the seal on his right glove failed, causing severe pain and disabling the hand during and for some time after the flight. He didn't inform ground control until afterwards, because he didn't want to abort the mission.

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: fridgmus
Posted 2012-12-03 21:03:31 and read 3912 times.

Quoting Areopagus (Reply 7):
Kittinger wore a full pressure suit. But the seal on his right glove failed, causing severe pain and disabling the hand during and for some time after the flight. He didn't inform ground control until afterwards, because he didn't want to abort the mission.

Hi Areopagus,

Sorry, I should have been more specific in my comment. I just finished reading Kittinger's autobiography, "Come Up and Get Me" and in it he stated that he wore a partial pressure suit as that was what was being worn by the high altitude pilots of the day. FYI, Project Excelsior was not about setting a record, but testing a new high altitude bailout system that is still in use today, albeit with some modern updates.

He did mention about his right glove. One tough dude! Love the title of his book, don't you?

F

Topic: RE: Understanding Space Suit Technology
Username: Areopagus
Posted 2012-12-04 10:43:55 and read 3847 times.

Quoting fridgmus (Reply 8):
One tough dude! Love the title of his book, don't you?

One tough dude is right. Also agreed on the title.


The messages in this discussion express the views of the author of the message, not necessarily the views of Airliners.net or any entity associated with Airliners.net.

Copyright © Lundgren Aerospace. All rights reserved.
http://www.airliners.net/