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Official STS130 Space Shuttle Endeavour Thread  
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 7924 times:
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Courtesy: NASA


Launch Target:
4:39 a.m. EST - Feb. 7, 2010
Orbiter:
Endeavour
Mission Number:
STS-130
(130th space shuttle flight)
Launch Window:
10 minutes
Launch Pad:
39A
Mission Duration:
13 days
Landing Site:
KSC
Inclination/Altitude:
51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles
Primary Payload:
32nd station flight (20A), Tranquility Node 3, Cupola

Had to start the thread as there is some not-so-good news to share... Tranquilitys ammonia coolant lines have failed qualification testing and burst. Possibility Endeavour may fly an alternate mission and dock Tranquility in keep alive mode, or shuttle manifest may be shuffled and another mission flown instead.

Endeavour Launch Preps in the Cold While Managers Evaluate Cooling Lines
Fri, 08 Jan 2010 06:09:25 PM EST


At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, throughout the weekend technicians will prepare space shuttle Endeavour for prelaunch propellant servicing at Launch Pad 39A

The shuttle continues to be sheltered from the Space Coast's uncharacteristically cold temperatures with heaters and warm air purges. This process will keep the spacecraft's systems at an appropriate temperature.

As International Space Station and shuttle teams prepared for February’s launch, a high-pressure ammonia jumper hose assembly failed during a prelaunch test Thursday. Four such hoses, which will be used to connect the new Tranquility module to the station’s cooling system, are to be installed and activated by spacewalkers during the STS-130 mission.

The teams are continuing to work toward a target launch of Endeavour on Feb. 7, however engineers are reviewing data from the test and evaluating whether there will be any impact to the shuttle mission. The analysis is expected to continue for several days.


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31 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLegs From Australia, joined Jun 2006, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 7862 times:

That would be right wouldnt it. I stay up until 1 am to buy tickets and now it looks like I will be going to miss the launch!  Wow!

On a serious note, how come these lines are being tested so close to the launch? I would have thought once it was in the payload bay, it would be sealed up and not touched again, save for cooling/heating etc.


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 7804 times:
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Quoting Legs (Reply 1):
On a serious note, how come these lines are being tested so close to the launch? I would have thought once it was in the payload bay, it would be sealed up and not touched again, save for cooling/heating etc.

My understanding is these lines aren't installed until an EVA after launch, so aren't physically connected before Tranquility is loaded in the payload bay.



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User currently offlineLegs From Australia, joined Jun 2006, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 7779 times:

Ok, that makes sense. I do hope things dont get delayed too long, Im only in Florida for a couple of days. Has there been any indication which of the possible solutions NASA are leaning towards?

User currently offlineSNA350 From Belgium, joined Dec 2005, 129 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 7777 times:

I don't think tranquility is already in the payload bay.
The payload is installed when the shuttle is at the pad.

But on the brighter side. looks like the problem is solved as they found some spare hoses.
Lookes like the mission is going forward as planned

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=19996.135



Aircraft flown: B733, B734, B736, B737, B738, B744, B752, B763, B772, A319, A320, A321, A343, A346, Do328, CRJ7, E190
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 7584 times:
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The launch is still on for 7 Feb.

Hose issue is not solved, however two approaches are being tried and probability is high one will work. They are: 1. Fix original hoses and 2. weld existing and already certified hoses together to length required for this mission.



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User currently offlineBEG2IAH From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 968 posts, RR: 18
Reply 6, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 7564 times:
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I bought a ticket for NASA Hall of Fame. NASA Causeway is sold out. This will be the last night launch, so I didn't want to miss the last chance to see the shuttle at night. Something tells me I'll be there for at least two more launches.  Smile

BEG2IAH



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User currently offlinePropilot83 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 8 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 7520 times:

As always, God willing, I will be watching the launch coverage live on NASA tv. Go NASA, and God speed to the STS-130 crew and launch team  bigthumbsup 

User currently offlineLegs From Australia, joined Jun 2006, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 8 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 7378 times:

Cooling line fix on track for Endeavour's launch
Posted: January 20, 2010

Work to modify hoses needed to route ammonia coolant to and from a new space station module is running on or ahead of schedule and the new lines should be delivered to the Kennedy Space Center in time for an on-schedule launch Feb. 7, officials said Wednesday.

"Right now, the schedule appears for that set of lines to be a couple of days ahead," he said. "Our original plan was to do our fit check and our opportunity with them next weekend, but they're ahead now and we'll be able to do that this Saturday, which is great news."

http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts130/100120tcdtqa/

All is looking well for a Feb 7 launch. Heres hoping all progresses smoothly from here on in.


User currently offlineBEG2IAH From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 968 posts, RR: 18
Reply 9, posted (4 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 7184 times:
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Endeavour Launch Date Officially Set
Wed, 27 Jan 2010 16:00:26 -0600


During Wednesday's Flight Readiness Review at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida NASA managers agreed that the shuttle, crew, support teams and procedures are ready for flight to deliver the Tranquility node and cupola to the International Space Station at 4:39 a.m. EST Feb. 7.

"We reviewed all the aspects of the shuttle and space station… the processing in Florida has gone exceptionally well ," said Bill Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for Space Operations, during a post-FRR news conference Wednesday. "This is really a complicated mission … if you take a look through the press kits you'll gain an appreciation of what will be going on at the station. "

International Space Station Program Manager Mike Suffredini agreed, "This is the primary objective of this mission -- the installation and activation of this module." Suffredini addressed the issues with the ammonia hoses and how the spares had been rebuilt and tested -- keeping the launch date on target. "The team deserves an enormous amount of credit for coming up with that solution and implementing it as quickly as they were able to do."

Mike Moses, space shuttle launch integration manager said it was a clean vehicle and clean flow. "We're real proud of the work everyone has done."

Mike Leinbach, space shuttle launch director said, "We're in outstanding shape." He also said Endeavour's aft doors closed will be closed eight to nine days ahead of schedule and the teams are looking at a standard flow ahead. "There are no problems and we're in great shape," said Leinbach.

Source: NASA



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User currently offlineBEG2IAH From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 968 posts, RR: 18
Reply 10, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 6879 times:
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NASA Managers Say "Super Shuttle" Sunday Launch a "Go"
Fri, 05 Feb 2010 11:00:50 -0600

Officials meeting at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida reviewed space shuttle Endeavour's readiness for flight at the L-2 prelaunch meeting. They unanimously decided to move forward with the STS-130 mission countdown to launch on Sunday at 4:39 a.m. EST.

Mike Moses, shuttle launch integration manager, said, "We're really looking forward to this launch carrying up node 3 and the cupola.

"From the shuttle program perspective, looking at our launch readiness, we're in really good shape. We had a fantastic review this morning," continued Moses, "Unanimous poll, everyone's pressing forward to go for launch."

Bernardo Patti, ESA's International Space Station program manager, said how happy and proud he is to see the last two European elements ready for the space station. He also commented on the great support and cooperation between the space agencies and how rewarding the process has been.

Mike Leinbach, shuttle launch director, reported his team is not tracking any technical issues and everything is on track for the rotating service structure rollback at 8 a.m. Saturday and loading of the external fuel tank with propellants around 7:15 p.m.

"The team is energized and excited about the countdown... looking forward to getting Endeavour off the ground Sunday morning," said Leinbach.

Kathy Winters, shuttle weather officer, said the forecast has improved and there's only a 20 percent chance weather would be an issue at launch time. Although it may be a little chilly and breezy, no constraints should be violated. The forecast at the transoceanic abort landing sites in Spain and France also looks favorable.

Saturday at 7 p.m., NASA TV will air the fueling of Endeavour's external tank at www.nasa.gov/ntv. At 11:30 p.m., live launch coverage will kick off on NASA TV.

You also can follow Endeavour's exciting countdown to launch with NASA's Launch Blog from inside Kennedy's Firing Room 3 beginning at 11:30 p.m. and continuing through main engine cutoff -- when Endeavour reaches orbit on its two-day race to the station.

Source: NASA



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User currently offlineSpringbok747 From Australia, joined Nov 2004, 4387 posts, RR: 10
Reply 11, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 6777 times:

Watching live NASA TV now..everything seems ok. Just under 5 hours now.


אני תומך בישראל
User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5712 posts, RR: 18
Reply 12, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 6737 times:

0929 GMT (4:29 a.m. EST)
SCRUB. Low clouds hanging over the Kennedy Space Center will prevent the space shuttle Endeavour from launching today on its mission to the International Space Station.

With a launch window lasting just 10 minutes to put the shuttle on the proper path to the reach the orbiting outpost, there's no time left to wait for the weather to improve.

Another opportunity to launch Endeavour will come tomorrow at 4:14 a.m. EST. Meteorologists predict a 60 percent chance of weather cooperating then.



User currently offlineflybaurLAX From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 638 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 6594 times:

They're putting their harnesses on and helping them through the hatch. Let's hope it goes up this time! Godspeed Endeavour!


Boilerup! Go Purdue!
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10898 posts, RR: 37
Reply 14, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 6526 times:

Quoting flybaurLAX (Reply 13):
They're putting their harnesses on and helping them through the hatch. Let's hope it goes up this time! Godspeed Endeavour!

At this time it looks like they are already up and going. I am on wireless and I cannot figure out if this is their first loop. The map on NASA TV shows the Shuttle flying over the North American territory. I hope I will be able to see them if they fly over my area, weather permitting. I will be looking them up especially the Italian Astronaut!      



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21634 posts, RR: 55
Reply 15, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 6420 times:

Saw the last two minutes or so of the ascent from the beach near JFK, and it was definitely worth it. The orbiter was clearly visible, with more of a trail than I was expecting. MECO happened right as it passed above the moon, and you could see the sporadic OMS burns for a couple of minutes after that. And it was seriously hauling across the sky - not that I was surprised by that, but it still makes an impression.

Unfortunately, that's the first and last time I'll see it from here unless another launch slips into nighttime.  

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineGAIsweetGAI From Norway, joined Jul 2006, 933 posts, RR: 7
Reply 16, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 6393 times:

NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day:

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/1002/sts30nightlaunch_nasa_big.jpg



"There is an art, or rather a knack to flying. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss."
User currently offlineATA1011Tristar From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 92 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 6287 times:

Hello Everyone! I watched a replay video of Endeavour's lift off on CNN

(Endeavour's Lift Off)

Monday afternoon because Endeavour launched at 3:13 A.M. in my time zone. I enjoyed the video very much; night launches are quite spectacular! I noticed that Endeavour moved upwards several feet after the SSME's ignited, but before the SRB's ignited. I have never seen this before in the 15 or 20 shuttle launches I have watched; is it normal? I also noticed that Endeavour moved pretty abruptly to the right of the picture just seconds after SRB ignition. Is it true that this movement was more abrupt than usual?


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 6264 times:
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Both effects are completely normal.

SSME ignition causes the SRBs to "bend" slightly at the joints. You'll see the nose of the external tank move several feet north immediately following SSME ignition, then the nose will comeback to it's starting position as the SRB structure absorbs the energy. SRBs are timed to ignite after they come back to vertical. This is officially referred to as the "Twang"

The vehicle moves to the north after SRB ignition/liftoff due to the offset thrust of the SSMEs.



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User currently offlineATA1011Tristar From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 92 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 6242 times:

ZANL188: WOW, great information! Thank you very much!

Does anyone know how long it takes the SRB's to throttle up to maximum thrust? Perhaps it is more or less instantaneous?


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 6235 times:
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This youtube shows both the "twang" and the sideways move to the north pretty well:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExfjSuJxOP8



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User currently offlinerwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2353 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 6216 times:
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Quoting ATA1011Tristar (Reply 19):
Does anyone know how long it takes the SRB's to throttle up to maximum thrust? Perhaps it is more or less instantaneous?

It's more or less instantaneous. I'm not sure what they're using for the initiator, but it will have a very quick propagation rate, and it essentially ignites the entire surface of the SRB propellant within a fraction of a second. And that might be tuned to make it more even, too. I don't really know what measures they took, but propagating the flame front through 40m of initiator in, say, a quarter of a second is not going to tax anyone. Obviously there will also be a (very small) period of time while pressure builds up, but over all the process takes a fraction of a second. A point of reference is that the explosive bolts on the SRB hold-downs are fired simultaneously with the SRB initiator charges.

As a general comment, "throttle" isn't a word that should be applied to solids. They're either burning or they've run out of propellant. Many solids (including the Shuttle SRBs) do have a variable thrust profile, which is usually done by shaping the propellant so that the surface area (where the combustion occurs) varies during the burn. For example, you might start out with a star-shaped core, which has a lot of surface area, but that will burn into a more circular core soon - so you'd have more thrust at ignition, and then less later. Or you might have a "deep" star pattern in the lower part of the propellant, and a simple round core in the top, which would cause the bottom to burn more quickly - again giving you more thrust early. In some cases various buffers are embedded in the propellant to alter the burn pattern. But this is all physically fixed at the time of manufacture.


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3595 posts, RR: 29
Reply 22, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 6102 times:

Quoting rwessel (Reply 21):
It's more or less instantaneous. I'm not sure what they're using for the initiator

In case you are interested, you might check this very informative site:

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/shuttle/reference/shutref/

It covers all aspects of the shuttle.


User currently offlineBEG2IAH From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 968 posts, RR: 18
Reply 23, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 5988 times:
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Guys,

Sorry if this looks like a shameless plug, but I wanted to share my launch experience with all of you.

http://www.flightlevel350.com/Aircra...ine_NASA_Aviation_Video-15817.html

Camera doesn't do it justice at all and sorry I couldn't cut some comments you can hear in the video. It was an amazing launch!

BEG2IAH

[Edited 2010-02-15 08:21:15]


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User currently offlineBEG2IAH From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 968 posts, RR: 18
Reply 24, posted (4 years 7 months 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5771 times:
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Latest on landing opportunities from NASA:

Weather permitting, Endeavour is scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center's shuttle landing facility at 10:20 p.m. EST. The latest Kennedy forecast calls for a chance of showers within 30 nautical miles of the shuttle landing facility and a cloud ceiling at 6,000 feet, both violations of landing rules. The forecast for Edwards Air Force Base in California also contains violations for showers within 30 nautical miles of the runway and cloud ceilings at 3,000 and 6,000 feet.

BEG2IAH



FAA killed the purpose of my old signature: Use of approved electronic devices is now permitted.
25 ZANL188 : Doesn't look good for tonight. KSC and Edwards both forecasted no go, although White Sands is forecast go. For tommorrow KSC & White Sands both f
26 BEG2IAH : Go for deorbit burn! KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, rwy 15. BEG2IAH[Edited 2010-02-21 17:52:35][Edited 2010-02-21 17:53:08]
27 KDTWflyer : And it has just arrived safely! Will this be the last night landing of the STS program?
28 BEG2IAH : Great landing. NASA TV screwed up camera views and Endeavour became visible from about FL100. Not sure if clouds had anything to do with it. BEG2IAH
29 L410Turbolet : Does anyone (else) plan to go to Florida to see the very last space shuttle launch on Sept. 16???
30 Post contains links L410Turbolet : An amazing picture of Endeavour's reentry back to Earth taken by International Space Station astronaut Soichi Noguchi from the ISS' Cupola "observatio
31 Post contains images BEG2IAH : Thanks for sending this! Saw the launch, now I can complete the collection. BEG2IAH
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