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SR-71 Sonic Booms  
User currently offlineKDTWFlyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 828 posts, RR: 1
Posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 7038 times:

Here is a clip of the sonic booms from a SR-71.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Z4zuOb2JWM


I have always thought the SR-71 Blackbird was amazing. 35 miles a minute while cruising at FL850.


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20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2108 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 6974 times:

Nice! Love that plane.


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User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 2, posted (4 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6782 times:

The double sonic-boom, what a distinctive calling card for an unlucky enemy.

User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12146 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 6752 times:

Quoting cpd (Reply 2):
The double sonic-boom, what a distinctive calling card for an unlucky enemy.

Who got to hear it when the SR-71 was then more than 100 nms away.


User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 6646 times:

I grew up in Palmdale, California in the 1950's. Sonic booms were and every day occuance. You could always tell the new kids in school because when there was a sonic boom they jump up and look around. After you lived there awhile you got use to them.

I do have a question, how do we know thoses are SR's booms?


User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 5, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 6541 times:

Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 3):
Who got to hear it when the SR-71 was then more than 100 nms away.

If I'm not mistaken, Gaddafi was on a TV broadcast when the sonic-boom was heard. He apparently rushed off.  

Even better, the crew that flew that particular flight saw the whole thing on TV once they returned.


User currently onlineKPDX From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 2749 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 6489 times:

Just found this gem from a SR-71 pilots own report.

"One day, high above Arizona , we were monitoring the radio traffic of all the mortal airplanes below us. First, a Cessna pilot asked the air traffic controllers to check his ground speed. "Ninety knots," ATC replied. A twin Bonanza soon made the same request. "One-twenty on the ground," was the reply. To our surprise, a navy F-18 came over the radio with a ground speed check. I knew exactly what he was doing. Of course, he had a ground speed indicator in his cockpit, but he wanted to let all the bug-smashers in the valley know what real speed was "Dusty 52, we show you at 620 on the ground," ATC responded. The situation was too ripe. I heard the click of Walter's mike button in the rear seat. In his most innocent voice, Walter startled the controller by asking for a ground speed check from 81,000 feet, clearly above controlled airspace. In a cool, professional voice, the controller replied, "Aspen 20, I show you at 1,982 knots on the ground." We did not hear another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast."


  
Read the rest here: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-vetscor/1981814/posts



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User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10027 posts, RR: 26
Reply 7, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 6486 times:
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Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 3):
Who got to hear it when the SR-71 was then more than 100 nms away.

Is that actually true? Just wondering - if you neglect speed of sound differentials in the atmosphere and such (which aren't huge), then from 80,000 feet and Mach 3.5, your Mach cone (and hence, sonic boom) hits the ground about 44.2 statute miles behind you.....unless I'm missing something  

Pretty impressive either way!



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 8, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 6454 times:

Quoting KPDX (Reply 6):
Read the rest here: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-...posts

It was from Brian Shul and Walter L Watson on a training flight, and the book it came from was Sled Driver. For a brief moment, Walter was a god - and the Navy had been flamed!  

The other stuff on that post came from "The Untouchables" limited edition - another great book. Their are plenty more great anecdotes in both books - especially the one about the weather balloon incident.


User currently offlineKDTWFlyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 828 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 6200 times:

Quoting 474218 (Reply 4):
I do have a question, how do we know thoses are SR's booms?

I made that video and used the audio track from a CD called Supersonics which stated that those are the sonic booms from a SR-71  



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User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 10, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 6144 times:

Quoting 474218 (Reply 4):

I do have a question, how do we know thoses are SR's booms?

That couldn't be anything else than the SR-71, unless it was two planes flying close together.A very distinctive double-sonic boom.


User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 6130 times:

Quoting cpd (Reply 10):
That couldn't be anything else than the SR-71, unless it was two planes flying close together.A very distinctive double-sonic boom.

Have heard thousands of sonic booms I can say only one thing, they were all double-booms.


User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2108 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 6059 times:

Quoting cpd (Reply 10):
That couldn't be anything else than the SR-71, unless it was two planes flying close together.A very distinctive double-sonic boom.

I've heard the Space Shuttles very, very distinctive double sonic booms many times as it passed overhead enroute to KSC (at least before the Columbia tragedy when I was still in the flightpath sometimes). But I would imagine the Concorde, B-1, Blackjack, Tu-144, etc also had them, as the double boom is a function of the length of the plane creating it.

I'm not doubting that those are SR-71 booms on his video, I'm sure they are but any large supersonic aircraft should in theory create a double boom.



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User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 6034 times:

Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 12):
I'm not doubting that those are SR-71 booms on his video, I'm sure they are but any large supersonic aircraft should in theory create a double boom.

Like I previously stated: All aircraft, regardless of size, create a double boom when they fly above Mach 1. The two booms are created by the rise of pressure at the nose of the aircraft and the return to normal pressure at the tail.


User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2108 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 6016 times:

Quoting 474218 (Reply 13):
Like I previously stated: All aircraft, regardless of size, create a double boom when they fly above Mach 1. The two booms are created by the rise of pressure at the nose of the aircraft and the return to normal pressure at the tail.

I've heard it explained that there is a seperate boom being created by the tail, which is too close together on smaller aircraft to be 'perceptible' to the common observer. Regardless I do not think on smaller, fighter size aircraft you can 'perceive' the double boom, whether its there or not. On larger aircraft you definitely can.  



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User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 6013 times:

Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 14):
I've heard it explained that there is a seperate boom being created by the tail, which is too close together on smaller aircraft to be 'perceptible' to the common observer. Regardless I do not think on smaller, fighter size aircraft you can 'perceive' the double boom, whether its there or not. On larger aircraft you definitely can.

The booms I heard 1950's they were made by F-100's, F-101, F-102's, F-104's and F-105's out of Palmdale, George and Edwards. They all made a double boom when going supersonic.


User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2108 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 6010 times:

Quoting 474218 (Reply 15):
The booms I heard 1950's they were made by F-100's, F-101, F-102's, F-104's and F-105's out of Palmdale, George and Edwards. They all made a double boom when going supersonic.

Then you have exceptional hearing.  

From NASA themselves:

The distinctive double sonic boom heard when the space shuttle lands results because the shuttle is large (at least relative to the other aircraft allowed to travel at supersonic speeds over land.) The text below is taken directly from information available through NASA's Spacelink system (http:// spacelink.nasa.gov) and enter "sonic boom" in the Search box.


"The Cause"

"Sonic booms are created by air pressure. Much like a boat pushes up a bow wave as it travels through the water, a vehicle pushes air molecules aside in such a way they are compressed to the point where shock waves are formed.
These shock waves form two cones, at the nose as well as at the tail of the vehicle. The shock waves move outward and rearward in all directions and usually extend to the ground. As the shock cones spread across the landscape along the flightpath, they create a continuous sonic boom along the full width of the cone's base. The sharp release of pressure, after the buildup by the shock wave, is heard as the sonic boom."

"The nose and tail shock waves are usually of similar strength. The time interval between the nose and tail shock waves is primarily dependent on the size of the aircraft and its altitude. Most people on the ground cannot distinguish between the two and they are usually heard as a single sonic boom. As the time interval increases, two booms are heard. A small fighter-type aircraft about 50 ft long will generate nose and tail shock waves of less than a tenth of a second (0.1 sec). The ear usually detects these as a single sonic boom."

"The interval between nose and tail shock waves on the Space Shuttles, which are 122 ft long, is about one-half of a second (0.50 sec), making the double boom very distinguishable."

You can access the entire document and much more at NASA Spacelink

John Haberman, Space Scientist
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/dec97/874604921.Eg.r.html



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User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 17, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 5887 times:

Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 16):
Then you have exceptional hearing.

Then I guess I do.


User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 18, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 5786 times:

Quoting 474218 (Reply 11):
Have heard thousands of sonic booms I can say only one thing, they were all double-booms.

As in a boom-boom, not, boom-boom, boom-boom.

Listen to a Concorde sonic boom, a very heavy and loud boom-boooooom, and compare SR-71 recorded above. If indeed it was one.

Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 14):
I've heard it explained that there is a seperate boom being created by the tail, which is too close together on smaller aircraft to be 'perceptible' to the common observer.

It was one of the famous SR-71 pilots who explained that, the seperate one for the engine spikes which were very far back.

[Edited 2010-02-09 18:16:40]

[Edited 2010-02-09 18:18:06]

User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2108 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (4 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 5778 times:

Quoting cpd (Reply 18):
Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 14):
I've heard it explained that there is a seperate boom being created by the tail, which is too close together on smaller aircraft to be 'perceptible' to the common observer.

It was one of the famous SR-71 pilots who explained that, the seperate one for the engine spikes.

I'm not going to argue with a Sled driver, but if that's what he said it seems odd because again, the distance between the spikes and the nose is about the length of a fighter airplane and, as the info I posted previously, should be too close together distance-wise to be audibly perceptably different... a tenth of a second according to the rocket scientist. (Blackbird is 107' long so from nose to spike is closer to fighter length difference).



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User currently offlineKDTWflyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 828 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (4 years 7 months 14 hours ago) and read 5103 times:

I wonder if the government advised the population lying under the flightpath of the first 'retirement' flight of the Blackbird in 1990 to Wright Patterson AFB in Dayton, OH that a loud sonic boom would be heard as it flew overhead at 35 miles per minute. Does anyone know how wide the sonic boom footprint of the SR-71 was while flying at 85,000 ft?


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