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Recommended Good Read Library  
User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Posted (3 years 11 months 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 19089 times:

I've just been trawling the web for ages looking for a good read on Military Aviation subjects when it occured to me that you guys would be the best demograph to recommend a reading list. I did a search to see if a topic like this is alive but couldn't find any.


So to get the ball rolling I've picked 3 good reads:

Boyd, The fighter pilot who changed the art of war; Robert Coram.
This is a simply excellent read, very hard to put down once you've started. Paints a really good picture of a flawed genius and gives a good insider view of Pentagon politics. Gives a great insight into what makes a good fighter while telling a great human story at the same time. Really a must read for mil-av fans.

Tomcat! The Grumman F-14 Story; Paul T Gillcrist.
This is probably the best all round Tomcat book printed (and I should know, I've got just about every one of them!) with brilliant photos throughout and is coming from an authority on the F-14 and Naval Aviation in general. If you're a Tomcat fan this is the one to have. It also makes an interesting counterpoint to Boyds book as the F-14 is just about the antithesis of everything Boyd espouses.

The Pentagon Paradox, The Development of the F-18 Hornet; James Perry Stevenson.
Another great book. A heavy enough read with loads of tables, appendices etc and not as flowing as Corams book above but impulsive reading none the same. Gives an amazing analysis of the Lightweight Fighter competition (birthplace of the F-16 and F-18) but also the extreme politics of weapon procurement in the US. Gives excellent analysis of weaponology (although a bit out of date as printed in 1993) and gives great airing to Boyd and Pierre Spreys theories on warfare. It sets the scene dramatically in the introduction where the Author basically de-bunks two of his previously notable published works on the F14 and F15 (from which I've often quoted in debates on here so I may have re-appraise my position in a few arguments!) as being (unintentionally!) informed by Pentagon propaganda and just keeps going in that vein.


Well, there you have my three recommendations, thanks in advance to anyone who post a few lines on their favorite mil-av reads!

55 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 1, posted (3 years 11 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 19094 times:

I loved reading Sled Driver and The Untouchables (Brian Shul and Walter Watson are responsible for those). The original editions are hard to find, and the current limited editions are ferociously expensive (and extremely well produced books).

Quoting spudh (Thread starter):
Tomcat! The Grumman F-14 Story; Paul T Gillcrist.

I may look for that one.


User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (3 years 11 months 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 19064 times:

Quoting cpd (Reply 1):
I loved reading Sled Driver and The Untouchables (Brian Shul and Walter Watson are responsible for those). The original editions are hard to find, and the current limited editions are ferociously expensive (and extremely well produced books).

Yeah, I'm dying to get my hands on those, supposed to be a great read but they are just too expensive!


User currently offlinegphoto From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 829 posts, RR: 25
Reply 3, posted (3 years 11 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 19021 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Hi spudh,

Quoting spudh (Thread starter):
Tomcat! The Grumman F-14 Story; Paul T Gillcrist.

I guess you've got his book, "Feet Wet - Reflections of a Carrier Pilot" which is a great read too. Full of anecdotes of his time as a naval aviator, from the highs to the lows, from triumph to tragedy. Another book you cannot put down once you have started.

Best regards,

Jim



Erm, is this thing on?
User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 17991 times:

Okay, here's another one for you Sled Driver lovers:

Skunk Works, by Ben R Rich and Leo Janos. ISBN 0-316-74330-5
This is a cracking read, generally narrated by Rich himself, who succeeded the legendary Kelly Johnson as head of Lockheed's Skunk Works, but liberally interspersed with articles from Test Pilots, Generals and Engineers involved in each of the projects from the U2, SR-71 and F117 among others. Rich was one of the main proponents of stealth technology and this book is a must read for anyone interested in any of these aircraft. I found the book particularly well written and it never waned from start to finish.
Highly recommended.


User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 5, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 17981 times:

Thanks for the recommendation.  

I ended up spending big dollars on Porsche: Excellence was expected, the 3 volume history of everything Porsche from the early years right through to modern day cars like the dominant RS Spyder, 911-GT1 and Panamera written by the legendary Karl Ludvigsen with help from Porsche (even Ferry Porsche helped out in sourcing information and material from what I hear).

Not strictly aviation related I know (it does have the Porsche PFM3200 plane engine in it though). Karl Ludvigsen is a genius, I don't think I've come across any other books with the same depth of detail and authority (on any subject) as his. I particularly loved the section on the Porsche 917 and Can-Am racing, along with the Porsche F1 projects section (TAG-Turbo success and the Footwork debacle), along with the later bits on the GT1/GT2 cars, and the Carrera GT. It is interspersed with funny little anecdotes from Porsche people - especially from Norbert Singer, the enormously skilled veteran engineer who loved to drive rule-makers mad by finding loopholes in their supposedly well thought out rules.  

I particularly loved the bit where in Group 5 racing, the 935 was very dominant, so the rule-makers allowed the cars to have their floors higher (allowing easier routing of their exhausts to the back on front-engine cars). What they didn't expect was that Norbert Singer would raise the floor of the rear-engined 935, and then drop the ride-height by an equal amount!   The inspectors had to admit it was all irrefutably legal.  

The PFM 3200 engine was quite interesting compared with others, and they showed one in a Cessna. I also never knew that Porsche was behind the flight-deck design for the Airbus A300/A310 aircraft, another of the bits covered in the book. It's surprising just how many different non-automobile projects they were involved in.

You also have to wonder, if they'd continued in aircraft engine construction - where would the standards be now?


User currently offlinebj87 From Netherlands, joined Jun 2009, 448 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 17921 times:

Jane's all the world aircraft might be interesting. It lists both military and commercial planes with a brief history of each. It contains a lot of rare planes and pictures.

Mind you the book will cost you a small fortune. But it can be yours for only 877.28 dollars and for that you even get free shipping!!!

http://www.amazon.com/Janes-Worlds-A...UTF8&qid=1295874559&sr=8-2

(edit; The latest version 2010-2011 is on sale for only 1045 dollars enjoy!)

[Edited 2011-01-24 05:13:32]

User currently offlineAgill From Sweden, joined Feb 2004, 1011 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 17880 times:

Quoting bj87 (Reply 6):

Mind you the book will cost you a small fortune. But it can be yours for only 877.28 dollars and for that you even get free shipping!!!

http://www.amazon.com/Janes-Worlds-A...UTF8&qid=1295874559&sr=8-2

(edit; The latest version 2010-2011 is on sale for only 1045 dollars enjoy!)

Man that is one expensive book I must say.


User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (3 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 17229 times:

Quoting cpd (Reply 1):
I loved reading Sled Driver and The Untouchables (Brian Shul and Walter Watson are responsible for those). The original editions are hard to find, and the current limited editions are ferociously expensive (and extremely well produced books).

Woohoo!! I just won a copy of The Untouchables on ebay!!! Happy Days 


User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (2 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 16090 times:

The Warthog and the Close Air Support Debate by Douglas N Campbell, ISBN 1557502323

I found this another fascinating read, really well written. I could hardly put it down after I started it. Campbell does not concentrate too much on the A-10 itself, there are better fact books out there (Mike Spicks Great Book of modern warplanes being the best), but more on the history of CAS and the USAF/US Army hate/hate relationship with carrying out this role. It gives a great analysis of CAS all the way from WW1 through to GW1. It takes the development of the A-10 right from its inception back in 1960's through its various fly offs all the way to actual combat employment. It does an honest job of assessing the A-10's strengths/weakness's without a hint of rose tinted glasses. I think this is a must read for for anyone interested in the CAS debate and is particularly pertinent with the F-35B future hanging in the balance at the moment.

If I was to criticise the book, there were one or two things that disappointed. Two small things were that the book would have benfitted from more photos and that a good fifth of the book is actually references so it finishes before you expect. The only real criticism is that I'd have liked a lot more analysis of the A-10's actual combat performance in the Gulf War. The whole book had threaded so many facets of the development of CAS together so well right upto that point that I felt it just needed a 'lessons learned ' section to complete it (this is where the big section of references annoyed me, I wasn't ready for the book to finish ). Here was the first combat deployment of the first US airframe specifically designed for CAS and I thought that following the vein of the rest of the book with more analysis of the design assumptions v combat reallities would have finished the book off perfectly. If it seems I'm being a lttle harsh thats because the rest of the book really was that good!


User currently offlineTUGMASTER From Northern Mariana Islands, joined Jul 2004, 692 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (2 years 9 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 15797 times:

Can't believe no one has mention...

Chickenhawk by Robert Mason

It's about a young lad who wanted to fly... found he could do it for free in the US Army..
Ended up in Vietnam ..
Anyway... a great read.
probably one of the best.

ENJOY


User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2106 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (2 years 9 months 8 hours ago) and read 15738 times:

Quoting TUGMASTER (Reply 10):
Chickenhawk by Robert Mason

Glad you mentioned it! That was the first novel I read by choice, I was in high school at the time, and it was especially interesting to me as my Dad was a Huey pilot in Nam 68/69, I was born at Ft. Rucker after he returned and was instructor piloting there (and he still flies civvy Hueys to this day).

It was a great book, couldn't put it down but didn't mention here because I haven't revisited it as an adult and not sure how it would stand up now for other people that didn't have such an obvious bias towards liking it as I did as a kid.



Here Here for Severe Clear!
User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2106 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (2 years 9 months 8 hours ago) and read 15736 times:

Also I would love to read most of the books mentioned above, especially the ones on the F-14 that spud talked about and the SR-71 ones that cpd lists... 2 of my 3 favorite birds and those books sound like an excellent read. Someday...


Here Here for Severe Clear!
User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (2 years 9 months 4 hours ago) and read 15711 times:

A definite must read "Tail-End Charlies: The Last Battles of the Bomber War, 1944--45".

User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (2 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 15538 times:

Quoting HaveBlue (Reply 11):
It was a great book, couldn't put it down but didn't mention here because I haven't revisited it as an adult and not sure how it would stand up now for other people that didn't have such an obvious bias towards liking it as I did as a kid.

Same as that, I read it years ago as a teenager and absolutely loved it  . I had a Lego Technics helicopter back then that had a working collective operating a swash plate but I didn't really get it until I read Chickenhawk. I remember feeling that I could go out, sit into a Huey and fly it after reading the book it was so descriptive. Funnily enough I just clicked on it in amazon a few days ago and was thinking I wouldn't mind reading it again.

For anyone doing a search the ISBN no is 0143035711


User currently offlinechrisco1204 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 28 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 15504 times:

Quoting spudh (Thread starter):

Tomcat! The Grumman F-14 Story; Paul T Gillcrist.

I've read it. A really great read. Especially for all the Top Gun movie buffs out there.


User currently offlinegeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 14346 times:

If you're interested in the Viet Nam "conflict", and the air war there, the best thing I ever read on it was "Thud Ridge" by Col. Jack Broughten ; ( I'm going from memory on his name, so it may be a little "off" ) Fantastic account of why so damn many of our planes got shot down needlessly; ( mainly due to the innate stupidity of Robert McNamara, then SecDef, and of course, the infamous L.B.J. ! ) ( I get pissed just thinking about those idiots, as do all pilots and air crew who had their B
butts "hanging out" ! )

A lot of this book deals with what happens when bureaucrats try to "micro-manage" aerial combat in S.E.Asia, while sitting on their fat asses behind desks in Washington, D.C.; planes are lost and men are lost, and all for no reason; Mac Namara
even admits to some extent in his "declining years". If you love military aviation, and despise ignorant, arrogant politicians, read this book..................

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlinerheite From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 10 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 14285 times:

How has nobody mention the greatest saterical novel Catch-22:

http://www.amazon.com/Catch-22-50th-..._1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328166676&sr=8-1

I read this growing up, even managed to get Col Olds to sign a photo of his May 4th kill when we ran into him at the airshow they used to put on in Louisville. It does have alot of photos, but some excellent easy reading on air combat in Vietnam:

http://www.amazon.com/Kill-MiGs-Comb..._1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1328166688&sr=8-2



-R.K. Heite Sr
User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (2 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 14024 times:

Quoting gphoto (Reply 3):
I guess you've got his book, "Feet Wet - Reflections of a Carrier Pilot" which is a great read too. Full of anecdotes of his time as a naval aviator, from the highs to the lows, from triumph to tragedy. Another book you cannot put down once you have started.

Best regards,

Jim

Jim,

I finally picked up this one up before Christmas on your recommendation. Thanks a million, I really enjoyed it, its a top read, couldn't put it down just like you said. Gilchrists description of carrier night traps in marginal weather is something that has remained vivid in my imagination, carrier flyboys can only be held in the highest repect after thinking about the guys in tankers who took off from the safety of a carrier deck to re-gas guys who couldn't land on that same carrier because conditions were so bad!!! OMG

Spudh


User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4472 posts, RR: 19
Reply 19, posted (2 years 6 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 14011 times:

Chickenhawk is probably the best book written about helicopter flying in Vietnam.


All of Gilchrist's books are brilliant.


Currently reading 'Fighter Pilot' by General Robin Old's who served as a P38 and P51 Pilot and was an Ace in WW2, he
finished his career flying F4's in Vietnam, an amazing career.


Of course, Catch 22 us simply one of the best books of all time.



The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlinesprout5199 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1852 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (2 years 6 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 13978 times:

I'll put in one


Flying Fortress by Edward Jablonski
http://www.amazon.com/Flying-Fortress-Edward-Jablonski/dp/0385038550

Talks about the B-17 from the old 299 to the last one, and the bloody 100th. Lots of great stories and details.


Dan in Jupiter


User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 12546 times:

A good opportunity here for an A.netter nut with £4,000 burning a hole in their pocket.

http://www.ebay.ie/itm/complete-coll...pt=Non_Fiction&hash=item2ec0006301

Amazing to have a collection like that at your finger tips.


User currently offlineAviRaider From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 183 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 12341 times:

If you like fiction I'd recommend anything written by Dale Brown. His stories have that Tom Clancy feel but is focused more on military aviation.

And if you like space history the biography of Gene Kranz, the famous Apollo era mission director, "Failure is not an Option," is a real good read and insight in the early space program days.


User currently offlinespudh From Ireland, joined Jul 2009, 301 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 6906 times:

Just finished another good read:

Moon Dust: In search of the men who fell to Earth
by Andrew Smith
ISBN 0747563691

This is a very enjoyable read, being focused on the human side of the Apollo Program it's not very technical but it does have some interesting descriptions of the actual moon landings.
The author describes how the idea of the book came to him after he had been interviewing Charlie Duke of Apollo 16 for a magazine during which Charlie took a phone call informing him of the death of Pete Conrad. Charlie's words "Now there are just nine of us" prompted Smith to interview the remaining 9 of 12 people who stood on the moon.
He focus's on how each of the men felt as they were on the moon and how their personal lives evolved after that momentous experience.

Smith peppers the book with interesting asides (such as Aldrin decking that conspiracy theorist) and his own reflections on the men and the whole Apollo Program. He does an interesting job on weighing up whether the Apollo Program was worth the $billions invested to be abandoned in 1972.

I really enjoyed this book.


User currently offlinerc135x From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 6609 times:

Books which reaffirmed my interest in aviation literature (as well as flying) are Robert L. Scott God is My Copilot, Antoine de St-Exupery Night Flight, and William Green Warplanes of the Third Reich.

On the U-2 read anything by Chris Pocock and Paul Crickmore is excellent on the SR-71. Jay Miller is an equally excellent author with extensive contacts.

More than anything else I would recommend reading the first 20 years or so (available in bound editions) of Air Enthusiast/Air International. Bill Gunston, David Anderton, and some of the other great pioneers defined the modern world of aviation writing.


25 canoecarrier : I forgot this thread was around. I read this one: JG 7: The Worlds First Jet Fighter Unit 1944/1945 a few months ago and thought it was a great read.
26 Post contains images flyingturtle : - "Strategic Bombing by the United States in World War II" by Stuart Halsey Ross. - "No End Save Victory", by various authors. It gives an account of
27 cjg225 : There is a book dedicated to my favorite aircraft of all time....? Sold.
28 Post contains links and images alberchico : I happen to be a fan of Russian jets like the SU-27 and Mig-29 so for me these 2 titles were a must buy when they first came out. At the time they cos
29 Post contains links Geezer : If you like to read about spy planes and the guys who flew them, take this link to the Roadrunner's website; lot of very interesting stories here, and
30 Post contains images spudh : Great Link Geezer!! Thats me sorted for reading material for a while There is a veritable library of books dedicated to the F-14, its up there with t
31 Post contains images Geezer : I'm glad to see this thread is still up, because I just found a "must have" book for anyone who loves airplanes, likes to read about them, or look at
32 Post contains images cjg225 : Awesome. Thanks. My nightstand book stack is down to one book, which I am currently reading. I was thinking this morning that I'll have to do somethi
33 Eagleboy : "Empire of the Clouds" James Hamilton; Is a great look at the British aircraft industry post WWII. Shows how they abandoned their advances in technolo
34 Post contains links alberchico : http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-C...rds=encyclopedia+of+civil+aircraft http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-W...craft/dp/0517362856/ref=pd_sim_b_2 ht
35 HaveBlue : Which one is better, this book or the official biography of him "BOYD - The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War "? I'm going to buy one this wee
36 Eagleboy : @HaveBlue... I only read the Grant Hammond book so can't give you a comparison. It focused more on Boyd's impact and less on his personal life. The au
37 spudh : Read Corams book if you want to be informed about Boyd, read Hammonds book if you want to be enlightened by Boyd. They're both great books, you'll en
38 nomadd22 : I second Skunk Works. It's insight into the military procurement system is almost as informative as the U-2 / SR-71 / F117 stories. Kelly Johnson was
39 Post contains links and images alberchico : The Airwar volumes by Jablonski are also a good read http://www.amazon.com/Air-War-Four-V...9&sr=8-2&keywords=airwar+jablonski These are also
40 Post contains links and images Confuscius : For those who are interested in dogfight tactics... Fighter Combat: Tactics and Maneuvering by Robert Shaw http://www.amazon.com/Fighter-Combat...ter+
41 Eagleboy : Nicely phrased. I think "Skunk Works" deserved a 2nd mention....fantastic book.
42 rc135x : Geez, and I thought I was the only other person on the planet who had Falklands: The Air War by BARG. An outstanding book.
43 Post contains links and images Confuscius : I have a pretty good collection of aviation books and most were purchased 10 to 30 years ago. I only bought one book in the last 10 years. The intern
44 Post contains links and images alberchico : http://www.amazon.com/Vietnam-The-War-In-Air/dp/0517629763 This book is an obscure gem on the Vietnam air war for those who need a comprehensive illus
45 Revelation : I just posted to the MIG-21 thread that "America's Secret MiG Squadron: The Red Eagles of Project CONSTANT PEG" is a good read...
46 HaveBlue : Thank you both. I'll probably get Hammonds book as I'm interested in hearing the full story of how he influenced fighter development and tactics. And
47 Post contains images rc135x : yes, and he's still writing the sequel to Top Gun
48 Post contains images sturmovik : and Love that book. Bought 7 copies over the course of many years, gave each one away to friends after reading in the hope that they too would see wh
49 rc135x : Although slightly dated Howard Moon's "Soviet SST: The Techno-Politics of the Tupolev 144" is excellent and is easily available at deeply discounted
50 Post contains images sturmovik : Thanks for that, will try and read it.
51 cjg225 : Thanks to those posting about good books. And thanks to Amazon.com for having a bunch! I purchased copies of Tomcat!: The Grumman F-14 Story by Paul G
52 Post contains links alberchico : I own a copy of this book and its a rare gem: http://www.amazon.com/Air-Wars-Aircraft-Detailed-Present/dp/0816023565
53 Post contains links alberchico : http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-2...opedia+of+20th+century+air+warfare http://www.amazon.com/The-Great-Book...-3-spell&keywords=modern+waeplane
54 Post contains links groover158 : Here are my favourite trio of reference books, great pictures and a great amount of very detailed information on these amazing aircraft: http://www.am
55 Max Q : 'Winged Victory' by VM Yeates. This book was printed in 1934, it is a story of one Pilot, in a Sopwith Camel Squadron and his combat experiences in WW
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