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Easa Grants Initial A400M Type Certificate  
User currently offlineRebelDJ From United Kingdom, joined May 2007, 112 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 7619 times:

Latest news 03/05/2012
EASA grants initial type certificate to Airbus Military for the A400M

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) issued on Thursday 3 May 2012 a so-called restricted type certificate (RTC) for the Airbus A400M aircraft. This first approval was presented by EASA Executive Director Patrick Goudou at an internal ceremony in Toulouse, France.

The RTC is a major milestone towards the award of a full EASA civil type certification which is expected in mid-2012 after a dedicated functioning and reliability flight test campaign will have been completed..

The aircraft certified by EASA is the civil version of the A400M: a four turboprop engine, eight blades propellers, medium range large aeroplane, with a maximum take-off weight of 137,5 Tons and a maximum ferry range of 4700 Nautical miles.

This A400M civil aircraft configuration and EASA certification will be the baseline for a subsequent recommendation for the military version of the A400M aircraft to be certified by the respective Military Airworthiness National Authorities, in accordance with their particular military certification and qualification requirements.

In addition to the aircraft RTC issued today, EASA previously issued the type certificates for the turboprop engine TP400-D6 granted to Europrop International on 6 May 2011 and for the propellers granted to Ratier-Figeac on 22 March 2012.

(Source: http://easa.europa.eu/home.php)

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offliner2rho From Germany, joined Feb 2007, 2603 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 7501 times:

An important milestone that adds credibility to the program. Having a certified aircraft, even with limitations, is a big deal. Although the real first big milestone will be full civil certification mid-year.

Still a lot of work to be done ahead, but congrats to Airbus on the achievement!


User currently offlineKFLLCFII From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 3301 posts, RR: 30
Reply 2, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 7467 times:

Just out of curiosity, were they also trying for US / FAA certification?


"About the only way to look at it, just a pity you are not POTUS KFLLCFII, seems as if we would all be better off."
User currently offlinemffoda From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 1071 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 7428 times:

Quoting r2rho (Reply 1):
An important milestone that adds credibility to the program. Having a certified aircraft, even with limitations, is a big deal. Although the real first big milestone will be full civil certification mid-year.

See, I thought the real IMPORTANT thing is to have a military air-lifter that can bring troops and equipment to and from a battlefield and not EASA certification! 



harder than woodpecker lips...
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3912 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 7297 times:

Quoting mffoda (Reply 3):

Part of the A400M requirement from day one was to have it certified to civilian standards, as they are more strict than military equivalents.


User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12134 posts, RR: 51
Reply 5, posted (2 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 7042 times:

Quoting KFLLCFII (Reply 2):
Just out of curiosity, were they also trying for US / FAA certification?

No

Quoting mffoda (Reply 3):
See, I thought the real IMPORTANT thing is to have a military air-lifter that can bring troops and equipment to and from a battlefield and not EASA certification!

Correct

Quoting moo (Reply 4):
Part of the A400M requirement from day one was to have it certified to civilian standards, as they are more strict than military equivalents.

Yes, having a civilian certificate was one oif the first requirements. But an EASA certificate is LESS strict than the military certification. It is under the military certification these airplane will operate, if the ever get to the customers. The military cert allows the aircraft to fly outside of civilian standards, such as bank angle, airspeeds, land/TO from unprepared surfaces, air drop troops and cargo, air refueling, defensive equipment, TACAN, military avionics, etc.

Having a civilian cert does allow for civilian parts to be used as replacements. The problem with that is no one outside of the EU and Indonesia are buying it. Only about 170 of them have been sold.


User currently offlinechuchoteur From France, joined Sep 2006, 763 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 6856 times:

Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 5):
The problem with that is no one outside of the EU and Indonesia are buying it. Only about 170 of them have been sold.

Outside of the EU:
Turkey (10)
Malaysia (4)

(not Indonesia)
Total 174 firm orders.

EASA certification is important because most european air forces are now operating under EASA rules (for example crews now pass an ATPL as well as their military ratings, and maintenance is now carried out to EASA rules).


User currently offlineebj1248650 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1932 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (2 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 6700 times:

Doesn't it make sense there will likely be more orders once the airplane is in service and has time to prove itself? It stands to reason that some governments are taking a wait-and-see attitude as surely as some airlines take one when a new model is offered for sale.


Dare to dream; dream big!
User currently offliner2rho From Germany, joined Feb 2007, 2603 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (2 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 6420 times:

Quoting mffoda (Reply 3):
I thought the real IMPORTANT thing is to have a military air-lifter that can bring troops and equipment to and from a battlefield and not EASA certification!

That's why I said the first big milestone. Obviously the most important one is the military certification, but having a full EASA certification is useful and opens up some operational capabilities, like using civilian air routes and ATC.

Furthermore, having a certification - any type of certification - is an important milestone per se, as it means your overall design is officially validated, it is no longer just a prototype, and you can tick off a lot of items on your development plan. It is much more than a piece of paper. And it certainly seems important to Airbus, as they did not want to wait for full certification in some months and have applied for a restricted certificate as soon as they could.


User currently offlineebj1248650 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1932 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (2 years 2 months 1 week ago) and read 5180 times:

When are the first production articles supposed to be delivered?

[Edited 2012-06-17 04:48:43]


Dare to dream; dream big!
User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 10, posted (2 years 2 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 5170 times:

Quoting ebj1248650 (Reply 7):
Doesn't it make sense there will likely be more orders once the airplane is in service and has time to prove itself? It stands to reason that some governments are taking a wait-and-see attitude as surely as some airlines take one when a new model is offered for sale.

I think from any potential air forces out there who need lift, a) it's not as capable as a C-17, although the cost is comparable, and b) it's too much aircraft for forces that need something along the lines of a C-130J.

I am not certain there will be many more orders, in fact given the situation in the EU now, orders might get cut. But of course I could be wrong.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12134 posts, RR: 51
Reply 11, posted (2 years 2 months 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 5144 times:

Quoting chuchoteur (Reply 6):
Outside of the EU:
Turkey (10)
Malaysia (4)

(not Indonesia)

Only Malaysia is really outside of the EU. Turkey applied for membership back in 1987, and its application was elevated to 'candidate status' in 1999. Turkey was one of the founding member states of the Council of Europe in 1949, and has been an associate member of the EU since 1964, when it was know as EEC ( because of the Ankara Agreement). As I understand it, the EU and Turkey are still in 'full membership negotiations'. Both France and Germany have argued against Turkey's full membership t the EU.

Turkey has the 18th largest economy in the world, according to the IMF 2011 numbers, and the 7th largest economy in Europe. Its economy is more than twice the size of Greece, which is an EU state, and about 12 X the size of Croatia, which applied for EU membership in 2009 and will probibly be allowed as a full member in 2013.

So, Turkey's order for the A-400M is actually part of the larger EU order of 170 airplanes. Turkey is one of the member states that decided to have OCCAR negotiate the order of the A-400Ms from EADS. Turkey (1) and France (3) are currently expecting the A-400M in 2013. No other states are expected to get their first A-400Ms before 2015, and Germany and Spain currently don't have an expected date to get theirs. Germany is still looking for buyers for 13 A-400Ms of the 53 they have on order.


User currently offlinescouseflyer From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2006, 3387 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (2 years 2 months 5 days ago) and read 4832 times:

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 10):
I think from any potential air forces out there who need lift, a) it's not as capable as a C-17, although the cost is comparable, and b) it's too much aircraft for forces that need something along the lines of a C-130J.

I am not certain there will be many more orders, in fact given the situation in the EU now, orders might get cut. But of course I could be wrong.

However with the C-17 line looking to be breathing its last next year or in 2014, if you need lift larger than a Herc from a western manufacturer, the A400M is looking like the only game in town.


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