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China To Launch Manned Spacecraft This Month  
User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 6828 times:

Its been quite a while since their last manned mission.
To recap, Shenzhou 5 put their first Taikonaut into orbit in October 2003 which was followed two years later by the two-crew Shenzhou 6. And then in 2008, Shenzhou 7 went up with three men, with EVA by two of them.
The upcoming Shenzhou 9 (last year's Shenzhou 8 was unmanned) will also carry three persons. It will be interesting to see if it will include their first woman Taikonaut or she will feature only in Shenzhou 10 (to be launched this year or the next).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18377735
http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stori...p_asiapacific/view/1206560/1/.html


Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinesweair From Sweden, joined Nov 2011, 1811 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 6757 times:

Is this really a soyuz copy? Or have they refined it?

User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6428 times:

Ok, so it will be that one of the two women - either Liu Yang or Wang Yaping, both of whom are 34 year old pilots in the People's Liberation Army Air Force and married with children - will be on Shenzhou 9 when it blasts off on its planned June 16 launch.


Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6423 times:

One of these two 3-member crews will make it on board Shenzhou 9:-
Nie Haisheng (Commander), Zhang Xiaoguang, Wang Yaping
Jing Haipeng (Commander), Liu Wang, Liu Yang

All six of them lined up and ready:
http://www.spxdaily.com/images-lg/ch...g-haipeng-liu-wang-liu-yang-lg.jpg



Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3874 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6388 times:

Quoting sweair (Reply 1):
Is this really a soyuz copy? Or have they refined it?

Its a huge refinement - they bought the Soyuz plans but essentially used it as a base to build their own, its not a direct copy nor is it a direct follow on.

The Shenzhou system is laid out like the Soyuz, but is larger in most aspects.


User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5997 times:

Shenzhou 9 launched on schedule at 6.37pm local time, Saturday, June 16 with the first woman taikonaut Liu Yang who contrary to earlier reports is not a mother yet. The other crew members are Jing Haipeng and Liu Wang
Little tiivia: 1) a minor record was set; the commander Jing Haipeng became the first astronaut/cosmonaut/taikonaut to blast off on a nation's back to back missions. He was on the preceeding Shenzhou 7 in September 25, 2008.
2) its the second time that a spaceship contained 2 persons with the same family name. The first was in January 12 1986 on Space Shuttle Columbia with Bill Nelson and George Nelson. Both pairs of Liu Yang/Liu Wang and Bill Nelson/George Nelson are similaritly unrelated to each other.



Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlineeksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 5951 times:
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ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting neutrino (Reply 5):
Little tiivia: 1) a minor record was set; the commander Jing Haipeng became the first astronaut/cosmonaut/taikonaut to blast off on a nation's back to back missions. He was on the preceeding Shenzhou 7 in September 25, 2008.

Negative on point #1: Astronaut Stephen Bowen was crew on STS-132 and STS-133. Back to back Space Shuttle missions.

I seem to remember another mission with same last names. It escapes me currently and I will have to check the files on that.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 5938 times:

Quoting eksath (Reply 6):
I seem to remember another mission with same last names. It escapes me currently and I will have to check the files on that.

Would it have that PS working for I believe McD at the time ? As I recall he did 4 missions running an experiment on the middeck.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 5781 times:

Quoting eksath (Reply 6):
Negative on point #1: Astronaut Stephen Bowen was crew on STS-132 and STS-133. Back to back Space Shuttle missions.

You are right in Stephen Bowen being on back to back shuttle missions.

However, my defination is broader; a nation's manned space mission and not vessel or vessel-type specific. To make your counter view murkier, in between STS-132 & STS-133, the US did send 4 of its spacefarers; Shannon Walker, Douglas Wheelock, Scott Kelly & Catherine Coleman to orbit via three Soyuz crafts.
Michael Melvill on the private venture SpaceShipOne did fly back to back sub-orbital flights...this one stand a better chance of challenging my observation on Jing Haipeng.

Anyway, to narrow your point even further, George Nelson was the first to be on successful back to back space shuttle flights in which the spacecrafts went into orbit and subsequently returned to earth; on STS-61-C and STS-26. Shuttle STS-52-L in between those two missions was the ill-fated Challenger which exploded during liftoff (RIP to Francis Scobee, Michael Smith, Judith Resnik, Ellison Onizuka, Ronald McNair, Gregory Jarvis & Christa McAuliffe).

And also just for more fun of (pedantic) facts, Liu Yang is NOT the first China-born woman in space. That honor went to Shannon Lucid who was born in Shanghai and grew up in Oklahoma, but I digress.

Quoting eksath (Reply 6):
I seem to remember another mission with same last names. It escapes me currently and I will have to check the files on that.

Would be interesting to know. I searched the astronauts list but failed to come up with anything. Maybe my bleary eyes missed it after scanning through hundreds of names.

[Edited 2012-06-18 09:58:42]

[Edited 2012-06-18 10:02:35]


Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlineeksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 5703 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting neutrino (Reply 8):
the US did send 4 of its spacefarers; Shannon Walker, Douglas Wheelock, Scott Kelly & Catherine Coleman to orbit via three Soyuz crafts

I see what you are looking for. I consider the Soyuz missions to be metal belonging to "other nations" even if it paid for by US tax dollars. I would note the widespread recognition inside NASA for Bowen and his successive flights (approx 9 months apart).

Quoting neutrino (Reply 8):
Liu Yang is NOT the first China-born woman in space. That honor went to Shannon Lucid who was born in Shanghai and grew up in Oklahoma, but I digress.

And if you factor in US Astronaut Leroy Chiao (both parents are Chinese and they fled China), he is "really" an ethnic Chinese despite being born in the US, he predates all the Chinese astronauts and has accomplished many more feats/milestones too!

Quoting neutrino (Reply 8):
private venture SpaceShipOne did fly back to back sub-orbital flights

Still a private effort and not related to the national effort.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlinewvsuperhornet From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 516 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 month 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 5361 times:

Quoting neutrino (Thread starter):
It will be interesting to see if it will include their first woman Taikonaut or she will feature only in Shenzhou 10 (to be launched this year or the next).

If its the pictures on the ones I saw they are kind of hot!!!!


User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 month 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 5242 times:

Quoting eksath (Reply 9):

Of course statistics and "facts" can be spinned any which way.   

Meanwhile, Shenzhou 9's primary mission of manual docking between 2 orbiting vessels has been accomplished...at about 45 minutes pass 0400GMT.

And in other news, co-incidental or otherwise, a PRC submersible has on the same day descended to below 7km in the Mariana Trench; the greatest depth accomplished by the Middle Kingdom's oceanauts. The Jiaolong also set the world depth record for a manned research vessel.
In case anyone attempt to mention the Challenger Deep missions of the 1960 Trieste and James Cameron's recent Deepsea Challenger, these two bathyscaphes could not navigate horizontally along the bottom of the sea bed and therefore had very limited scientific exploration capability.
Different "animals" but as this is divergence from the topic, I shall not delve into greater detail.   



Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10893 posts, RR: 37
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 month 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 5239 times:

Quoting neutrino (Reply 11):
Meanwhile, Shenzhou 9's primary mission of manual docking between 2 orbiting vessels has been accomplished...at about 45 minutes pass 0400GMT.

And in other news, co-incidental or otherwise, a PRC submersible has on the same day descended to below 7km in the Mariana Trench; the greatest depth accomplished by the Middle Kingdom's oceanauts. The Jiaolong also set the world depth record for a manned research vessel.

This is wonderful news that China Space teams and astronauts on orbit accomplished their first successful manual docking of the Shenzou 9 with the Chinse orbital lab.

I see quite a good possibility of the Chinese being the next humans to step foot on the Moon.

Congratulations China!!!

        



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineeksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 month 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 5133 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting neutrino (Reply 11):
Of course statistics and "facts" can be spinned any which way.

Another fact that cannot be ignored or magically forgotten is that it is the Russians who sold the Chinese the plans and know how and how to pull this off. So yes.. the transfer of the plans and technology of the Russian Soyuz spacecraft,the training, life support systems, docking systems, and space suits in 1994/1995 are facts that a lot of people forget or are not aware off. This helped the Chinese to "leap forward" to 1966.

Gemini 8 did the first successful docking between two spacecraft on March 16, 1966

..and those are facts with no spin involved.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3874 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 month 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 5081 times:

Quoting eksath (Reply 13):
..and those are facts with no spin involved.

There is spin however -

Quoting eksath (Reply 13):
magically forgotten
Quoting eksath (Reply 13):
"leap forward"

Both of those were editorial opinions and not fact.

China is on their fourth manned mission, and they have already docked with their own space station. Sure, the Soyuz was used as a base, but its not a straight copy - the Chinese variant is larger, and contains a large percentage of completely home grown technology.

Whenever a country has its own manned space program there will always be "firsts" for that country - that doesnt mean they are playing a 40 year game of catch up, it just means they are things that need to be done for them to be done!


User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 1 month 12 hours ago) and read 4858 times:

Quoting eksath (Reply 9):
Quoting neutrino (Reply 11):
Of course statistics and "facts" can be spinned any which way.
Quoting eksath (Reply 13):
..and those are facts with no spin involved.
Quoting moo (Reply 14):
There is spin however -

Quoting eksath (Reply 13):
magically forgotten
Quoting eksath (Reply 13):
"leap forward"

Both of those were editorial opinions and not fact.

I rest my case (thanks for saving my breath, moo), but feel free to put in your last words if that will make you happier.

Again back to the thread topic.
The "Divine Vessel no.9" has landed!
13-day mission accomplished.
A landmark chapter successfully closed and on to the next continuing steps of Shenzhou 10 and beyond.

Compared to the two pioneers, China's progress in her effort to conquer the final frontier has been excrutiatingly slow. But like the proverbial tortise chasing after the hare, she could one day pass them by as evidenced below. That being said I wish the good old US of A will in the not too distant future rediscover their Apollo and Saturn5 spirit...and go where no man has gone before.
Reuters, Friday, Jun 29, 2012: The United States will not test a new rocket to take people into space until 2017, and Russia has said manned missions are no longer a priority.
China plans an unmanned moon landing and deployment of a moon rover and its scientists have raised the possibility of sending a man to the moon, but not before 2020.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-18636819



Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
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