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Felix Baumgartner Set For Skydive Record Attempt  
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 10906 times:

I've been following Felix Baumgartner and Red Bull Stratos for a while yet. I am a big time fan and supporter!

Today will be his day. I hope all will go well during ascent and the jump.
What he is doing here is truly incredible... simply beyond words...

     

Austrian Felix Baumgartner set for skydive record attempt

The Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner will attempt to become the first human to break the sound barrier unaided by a vehicle.
He is going to jump out of a balloon at more than 120,000ft (36.5km) above Roswell, New Mexico.
In the near vacuum at that altitude, he should accelerate beyond about 690mph (1,110km/h) within 40 seconds.
Assuming all goes well, he will open a parachute near the ground to land softly in the local desert.

read more:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19860249

        


Red Bull Stratos
http://www.redbullstratos.com/

Good luck Felix Baumgartner! All the Best!!! Wishing you total success!!!


                 


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
71 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineTripleDelta From Croatia, joined Jul 2004, 1123 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 10897 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
PHOTO SCREENER

This has already been done - with slightly lower parameters - in 1960 by Joseph Kittinger during Project Excelsior  .

http://www.af.mil/information/heritage/spotlight.asp?id=123109977

The only difference - apart from Baumgartner's vastly superior equipment - is the fact that Kittinger's jump is not an officially recognized world record.



No plane, no gain.
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 10892 times:

Quoting TripleDelta (Reply 1):
This has already been done - with slightly lower parameters - in 1960 by Joseph Kittinger during Project Excelsior

Kittinger is one most essential part of the Felix Baumgartner Red Bull Stratos team.

I greatly admire the man, considering the fact that his equipment was much less sophisticated than the equipment made available to Felix Baumgartner and there was much risk to his attempt at the time.

I hope today will go well for Felix Baumgartner. What he is doing is truly incredible and beyond words, not talking about danger - I hope his mission will be a 100% success.

  

There will be a live feed of the whole mission (with a 20 seconds time lap) on the Red Bull Stratos page linked above.

Hope for the better.
Go Felix Baumgartner!

        



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 10749 times:

Red Bull Stratos Mission Resumes

Balloon lay out has begun

Standby for update at 9.30 AM (MDT)

http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/

        



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineklemmi85 From Germany, joined Mar 2009, 210 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 10679 times:

What about terminal velocity?
Does he jump from that height because the atmosphere provides very little drag so he can actually accelerate enough?

That would also mean, the lower he gets, the slower he becomes, right?


User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 10674 times:

The livecast has started. One minute to go for launch!

Good luck Fearless Felix!

http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/

I hope this one will be a total success!

     



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29802 posts, RR: 58
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 10666 times:

Good luck.

Gravity, what a heartless bitch art thou.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineGrahamHill From France, joined Mar 2007, 2849 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 10660 times:

Launch aborted! Too much wind apparently.


"A learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant one" - Moliere
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 10653 times:

Quoting GrahamHill (Reply 7):
Launch aborted! Too much wind apparently.

He is very disappointed and so is his mother.

Oh well. Better safe than sorry.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineGrahamHill From France, joined Mar 2007, 2849 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 10650 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 8):
Better safe than sorry.

Exactly. It's already a perilous jump, so it's better not to add more risks to it.



"A learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant one" - Moliere
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 10627 times:

This balloon is now useless. The commentator says it cannot be reused. There is another spare balloon on site.
Also they had a problem with one of the on board radios in the capsule that was not working properly.

    

I took a screenshot
Felix Baumgartner in his capsule when they announced launch abort.

http://i380.photobucket.com/albums/oo250/parisquilts/Divers/BaumgartnerFelix91012_zps7c966405.jpg

Launch called off due to wind gusts.
Well, that is anticlimactic. Once they started inflating the balloon it began to be whipped in the wind and it became apparent that full inflation would be impossible.

"Whoa, gusty winds are taking that balloon down now," said the Red Bull announcer. "That's going to be a problem. There's the decision. Abort the attempt.

"May or may not be tomorrow" -commentator.

"That's the decision. This is going to be off for today. ... They had the window for a short while. But the winds are a huge concern."

 airplane   Sad

[Edited 2012-10-09 11:17:11]


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 10282 times:

Countdown
03 days 03:53:12

Current Status
Next weather window to launch Felix Baumgartner opens Sunday, Oct. 14th. More weather updates to follow as we get closer.

http://www.redbullstratos.com/

     



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineEagleBoy From Niue, joined Dec 2009, 1850 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 10275 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting klemmi85 (Reply 4):
Does he jump from that height because the atmosphere provides very little drag so he can actually accelerate enough?

Yeah. I'm a bit hazy on the physics but he will be so high that there will be no atmosphere to create drag. He will keep accelerating for the first min or two, this is the point when he should exceed the speed of sound. After that the atmosphere will slow him down until he opens the chute at 5K feet.


User currently offlineTripleDelta From Croatia, joined Jul 2004, 1123 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 10275 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
PHOTO SCREENER

Quoting EagleBoy (Reply 12):
Yeah. I'm a bit hazy on the physics but he will be so high that there will be no atmosphere to create drag.

A side effect is also that it is easier to break the sound barrier at that altitude. The speed of sound is function of temperature and drops as the temperature drops. For example, at sea level in standard conditions - 15 degrees Centigrade - the speed of sound is about 661 knots/761 mph; at 120,000 ft - where the temp is about -40 Centigrade - it drops to 611 knots/703 mph.

EDIT: at 36,000 ft - where the tropopause starts on average - the temperature is even lower, -56 Centigrade in standard conditions, giving a speed of sound of "just" 589 knots, or 678 mph  Smile.

[Edited 2012-10-11 01:39:55]


No plane, no gain.
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 week 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 10113 times:

Posting the latest update from the Red Bull Stratos web page:

Countdown
02 days 01:42:23
Current Status

Weather still looks favorable for a launch Sunday Oct. 14th. Forecast: sunny, low: 47°F / high: 81°F, lightest winds in the morning.

     



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2439 posts, RR: 14
Reply 15, posted (2 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 9908 times:

00 days 02:03:14
Current Status

Weather hold. Launch window opens @ 8:45 MDT. Wind too strong at top of balloon. Team optimistic conditions will improve.



Good, then I can go running now...


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineiFlyLOTs From United States of America, joined Apr 2012, 491 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (2 years 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 9856 times:

Estimated 120 minutes till jump


"...stay hungry, stay foolish" -Steve Jobs
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 17, posted (2 years 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 9836 times:

The live feed has begun.

http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/

All the best Felix!

Wishing you a 100¨successful jump on this try!

Keep safe!

http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/

        



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineSemaex From Germany, joined Nov 2009, 823 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (2 years 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 9804 times:

Watching the live action on ServusTV, he just passed 62,000ft at -60°C, breathing 100% oxygen. The so-called "Armstrong Line" is going to be crossed soon, an altitude at which man's bodily fluids would start to boil without adequate safety measures.
Live feed clearly shows the curvature of the earth, cam setup is very high quality, I hope the jump will be just as impressively filmed as the launch.


All the best to Felix! This is a big achievement to all of humankind!

  



// You know you're an aviation enthusiast when you look at your neighbour's cars and think about fleet commonality.
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2439 posts, RR: 14
Reply 19, posted (2 years 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 9791 times:

Twitter:

Mitt Romney : "Pourquoi le mec est dans une capsule ?" #livejump

("Why is this guy in a capsule?")


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineSemaex From Germany, joined Nov 2009, 823 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (2 years 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 9776 times:

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 19):
Mitt Romney : "Pourquoi le mec est dans une capsule ?" #livejump

Because a house is too heavy  



// You know you're an aviation enthusiast when you look at your neighbour's cars and think about fleet commonality.
User currently offlineMarkusMUC From Germany, joined Jun 2010, 15 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (2 years 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 9687 times:

This was crazy.
Congrats, Felix!

I'm still fascinated by this jump.

[Edited 2012-10-14 12:00:47]

User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5672 posts, RR: 10
Reply 22, posted (2 years 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 9678 times:

Pretty freaky watching him step off from 128,000ft/39,000m and disappear. And I have done quite a few skydives!

Very stable initial departure though (but he did start spinning and tumbling during FF).

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 23, posted (2 years 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 9655 times:

Felix has landed safely from his jump from the Stratosphere.

Preliminary Figures, official data TBC:

Altitude: 128,097 ft
Duration of freefall: 4:19
Total jump time: 9:03
Speed: 1137 kmh

http://win.gs/stratoslive

              

Truly incredible!

I captured screenshots during ascent and jump/freefall/landing.
I will post them on this thread later.

What a day!

 highfive 

World's Highest Skydive! Daredevil Makes Record-Breaking Supersonic Jump
...
Unofficial results of the jump showed Baumgartner spent about 4 minutes and 22 seconds in freefall, a bit short of the longest freefall record, but that he had a speed of about 700 mph, which would clinch the supersonic milestone, Red Bull Stratos officials said.

http://news.yahoo.com/worlds-highest...breaking-supersonic-181843879.html

A press conference is expected shortly.

http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/

 spin   trophy 

[Edited 2012-10-14 12:12:40]


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlinerwy04lga From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 24, posted (2 years 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 9491 times:

Chuck Yeager first went supersonic in the X-1 on the same day in 1947.

[Edited 2012-10-14 12:56:24]

[Edited 2012-10-14 12:57:18]


Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 25, posted (2 years 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 9761 times:

Skydiver Felix Baumgartner lands highest ever jump

Highlights from Felix Baumgartner's leap into the record books
(with video)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19943590

He reached 729 MPH during freefall (1.173 km/h)
It scared me when I saw him spinning down at such high speed.

Truly beyond words.

My respect, Sir!



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlinezeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9149 posts, RR: 76
Reply 26, posted (2 years 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 9779 times:

Pitty this is in the wrong forum, it was civil av.

If you do not believe me, look at the FAA written on the back of the second person to get out of the helicopter after the phtotgeapher.

Nice civil sponsorship by Red Bull to make this happen. They make many of the better civil av things in my view happen these days.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlinerwy04lga From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 27, posted (2 years 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 9931 times:

Live broadcast starting now


Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2439 posts, RR: 14
Reply 28, posted (2 years 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 9918 times:

When he landed, I remembered the "Wile E. Coyote & Roadrunner" episodes. I expected him to land upon a cactus...

Quoting rwy04lga (Reply 27):
Live broadcast starting now

What?




David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineJeffSFO From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 838 posts, RR: 4
Reply 29, posted (2 years 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 9742 times:

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 28):
Quoting rwy04lga (Reply 27):
Live broadcast starting now

What?


I think he was talking about the press conference.


User currently offlinefridgmus From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 1442 posts, RR: 11
Reply 30, posted (2 years 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 9735 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Congratulations to Felix and the Redbull STRATOS Team!      

Felix Baumgartner has now joined the fraternity of men and women who have "Pushed the Envelope" for the betterment of mankind. The reason I say that is that Redbull STRATOS is sharing all their information and space suit technology with NASA and other related agencies. They will be making high altitude aviation safer and I believe they'll even have an impact on space tourism.

What is also too cool is that Felix had the previous record holder, COL Joe Kittinger USAF (ret) as his CAPCOM! Joe is 84 years young and still full of fire. During the post-jump press conference, Joe gave the "One finger salute" to those who said Felix will fail! Joe and Felix were meant for each other!

While Felix did spin, there was no doubt in my mind that as soon as he could grab enough air, he would get out of the spin.

I encourage all of you who are interested to go to the Redbull STRATOS website (www.redbullstratos.com) and just spend some time there. They have lots of videos showing the progress of the project and it also shows that Felix is real down-to-earth guy.

Now, what's next???



The Lockheed Super Constellation, the REAL Queen of the Skies!
User currently offlinerwy04lga From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 31, posted (2 years 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 9682 times:

Quoting JeffSFO (Reply 29):
Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 28):
Quoting rwy04lga (Reply 27):
Live broadcast starting now

What?


I think he was talking about the press conference.

Yes, sorry for the confusion.  



Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
User currently offlinequeb From Canada, joined May 2010, 704 posts, RR: 3
Reply 32, posted (2 years 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 9652 times:

Officials numbers, videos and pics here :

https://www.redbullcontentpool.com/content/stratos/products/red_bull_stratos_mission_accomplished;jsessionid=A30BEA3386F287390F78DB0EDAE2F372

Altitude: 128,100 ft (39 045 m)
Duration of freefall: 4:20
Speed: 1342.8 km/h (Mach 1.24)



[Edited 2012-10-14 18:04:00]

User currently online9VSIO From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 722 posts, RR: 2
Reply 33, posted (2 years 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 9529 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting zeke (Reply 26):
If you do not believe me, look at the FAA written on the back of the second person to get out of the helicopter after the phtotgeapher

Wasn't he from the FAI, and not the FAA?



Me: (Lining up on final) I shall now select an aiming point. || Instructor: Well, I hope it's the runway...
User currently onlinecrownvic From United States of America, joined exactly 10 years ago today! , 1933 posts, RR: 5
Reply 34, posted (2 years 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 9544 times:

What happens to the balloon and capsule???

User currently offlineBlueElephant From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 1813 posts, RR: 6
Reply 35, posted (2 years 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 9573 times:

Quoting crownvic (Reply 34):
What happens to the balloon and capsule???

Not sure what happened to the Balloon - the Capsule itself came down shortly after Felix - with much more data!


User currently onlinecrownvic From United States of America, joined exactly 10 years ago today! , 1933 posts, RR: 5
Reply 36, posted (2 years 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 9543 times:

Can you explain further?? How did it come down..?.?

User currently offlinegarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined exactly 11 years ago today! , 5404 posts, RR: 53
Reply 37, posted (2 years 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 9554 times:

Quoting crownvic (Reply 36):
Can you explain further?? How did it come down..?.?

The capsule was designed to detach from the balloon and then deploy a parachute so it could be recovered.



South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
User currently offlineKBJCpilot From United States of America, joined May 2012, 177 posts, RR: 6
Reply 38, posted (2 years 6 days ago) and read 9522 times:

The capsule landed under a parachute approximately 20 minutes after Felix touched down. I'm unsure of the disposition of the balloon, however.


Samsonite, I was way off!
User currently offlinerlwynn From Germany, joined Dec 2000, 1093 posts, RR: 1
Reply 39, posted (2 years 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 9078 times:

One thing I do not find correct is that he will not get a record for the highest balloon flight because the rules are that you must come back down to earth with the balloon. Obviously he did not.


I can drive faster than you
User currently offlinezeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9149 posts, RR: 76
Reply 40, posted (2 years 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 8965 times:

Quoting 9VSIO (Reply 33):
Wasn't he from the FAI, and not the FAA?

I think you are right NAA/FAI. 40 km up is also a long way from space, depending on where you are from, they define it at 80 to 100 km.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineautothrust From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 1596 posts, RR: 9
Reply 41, posted (2 years 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 8930 times:

Really i cannot understand all this hype. Nobody cared when Kittinger did the same and achieved 990km/h with 60's technology.

Besides i cannot express how i hate the press for lying to the people with such titles:

Austrian going to jump from space

Jump from Space

Felix Baumgartner freefall jump from space

     

http://www.abendblatt.de/vermischtes...-war-schneller-als-der-Schall.html

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/news-details.php?nid=252797

The last time i looked at FAI international standards the space begins at 100km and not at 39km.
 



“Faliure is not an option.”
User currently online9VSIO From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 722 posts, RR: 2
Reply 42, posted (2 years 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 8474 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting autothrust (Reply 41):

Really i cannot understand all this hype. Nobody cared when Kittinger did the same and achieved 990km/h with 60's technology.

The wonders of youtube and Red Bull, I'm afraid. No one cared when air races were on, till Red Bull brought them right into the middle of a city...



Me: (Lining up on final) I shall now select an aiming point. || Instructor: Well, I hope it's the runway...
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 43, posted (2 years 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 8362 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 41):
Really i cannot understand all this hype. Nobody cared when Kittinger did the same and achieved 990km/h with 60's technology.

There was no hype. No mainstream media (BBC CNN etc.) had any live cast coverage of Baumgartner's free fall speed record. None of them. It was all on the Internet, Red Bull Stratos then picked up by Youtube, Twitter feeds and maybe some local TV channels near Roswell.

     

The media back in Kittinger's days were not anything comparing to what they are now. No one would even dare to think of people getting instant news feed on a pocket phone or thorugh a personal computer. Those families with money had fat black and white TVs. My parents got their first TV in the Summer of 1960 for the Rome Olympic Games.

What was going on in one country was not necessarily publicized in other countries. No one would be aware of these things aside from interest communities. Proper learning of foreign languages and world travel was mostly available to those with high income.

  

Now anyone try to beat Baumgartner's feat unless he himself decides to make another attempt to go higher and faster after some time. The man needs a good rest and time to enjoy life and his wonderful supportive family.

Felix Baumgarrtner is a Hero.

Even popular news papers such as the Daily Mail are coming up with stories with lots of pictures, diagrams and videos to explain to the common man what Fearless Felix had to go through to achieve his incredible mission.

  

Faster than the speed of sound: Supersonic skydiver Fearless Felix hits mach 1.24 in terrifying plummet to Earth from 128,000ft

'Fearless Felix' Baumgartner completes astonishing drop from the top of the stratosphere
Breaks the speed of sound after travelling at mach 1.24
Austrian daredevil had been planning the feat for five years
Previous launches had been delayed due to wind
One tiny error could have resulted in his blood boiling and his brain exploding

For more than four nerve-racking minutes, he was a tiny white speck against a dark sky, hurtling from 24.5 miles above the Earth at up to 834mph.

Then his parachute opened and five minutes later, to the relief of the millions watching, ‘Fearless Felix’ Baumgartner was back on solid ground – having made the highest and fastest skydive in history .

In the process, the 43-year-old Austrian became the first freefall diver to break the sound barrier, and also broke the record for the highest-ever manned balloon ascent.

The story with pictures, diagrams and videos:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...rth-nearly-128-000-feet-Earth.html

I am thankful that few global companies such as Red Bull are showing interest for sponsoring extreme sports and putting a lot of money into them.

Self-made Billionaire Red Bull owner Dietrich Mateschitz is Austrian. He is Felix Baumgartner's countryman.
http://www.forbes.com/profile/dietrich-mateschitz/

Thank you Red Bull for making this possible.

        

[Edited 2012-10-15 06:29:45]


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineautothrust From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 1596 posts, RR: 9
Reply 44, posted (2 years 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 8245 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 43):

Felix Baumgarrtner is a Hero.

I think we have different definitions what a hero is.    A fanatic base jumper which makes stunts for his ego or a company marketing belongs not what i would call a hero.

How does his jump bring forward the mankind? In what way do his actions help someone?

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 43):
Now anyone try to beat Baumgartner's feat

The real feat was Kittingers jump, with 60's technologies in a open balloon and rudimentary equipment(without space suit) not a hermetic warmed up hightech balloon with a high tech suit.

In the sixties they even didn't know what would happen at this heights, it took 52 years to leapfrog his record.



“Faliure is not an option.”
User currently offlineyellowtail From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 6218 posts, RR: 2
Reply 45, posted (2 years 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 8169 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 43):
There was no hype. No mainstream media (BBC CNN etc.) had any live cast coverage of Baumgartner's free fall speed record. None of them. It was all on the Internet, Red Bull Stratos then picked up by Youtube, Twitter feeds and maybe some local TV channels near Roswell.

Actually it was on Discovery live



When in doubt, hold on to your altitude. No-one has ever collided with the sky.
User currently offlineTJCAB From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 334 posts, RR: 0
Reply 46, posted (2 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 8049 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
I think we have different definitions what a hero is.    A fanatic base jumper which makes stunts for his ego or a company marketing belongs not what i would call a hero.

How does his jump bring forward the mankind? In what way do his actions help someone?

Oh thank you for saying that. My thoughts exactly. The term is miss-used terribly. While it was interesting to see and all, I find the whole thing completely pointless. If we want to say it's about beating a record, entertainment, ego, marketing OK, that that's it. Lt's not make it what it isn't.

Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
The real feat was Kittingers jump, with 60's technologies in a open balloon and rudimentary equipment(without space suit) not a hermetic warmed up hightech balloon with a high tech suit.

In the sixties they even didn't know what would happen at this heights, it took 52 years to leapfrog his record.

correct! once should not even categorize them together.


User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2439 posts, RR: 14
Reply 47, posted (2 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 8034 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 41):
Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
I think we have different definitions what a hero is. A fanatic base jumper which makes stunts for his ego or a company marketing belongs not what i would call a hero.

I agree with you. What I really enjoyed, though, was the imagery relayed by the capsule.

In my book, a hero is somebody who has defied real dangers to his health and life.

Some heroes may be outright stupid, some heroes may not even achieve something worthwhile. And lastly, a hero depends on his luck and not on tedious preparations.



I don't think Red Bull would have bankrolled his record attempt if his chances of dying would be in the 5-20% range.

So... puh-leeze.


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlinewindy95 From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 2739 posts, RR: 8
Reply 48, posted (2 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 8029 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
The real feat was Kittingers jump, with 60's technologies in a open balloon and rudimentary equipment(without space suit) not a hermetic warmed up hightech balloon with a high tech suit.

In the sixties they even didn't know what would happen at this heights, it took 52 years to leapfrog his record

I have to agree with oyu on this point. What Kittinger did was way beyond yesterdays jump. Kittenger was also an accomplished Air Force test pilot with over 16K hours and unknown amount of aircraft.

We watched it live on Discovery and it was great to watch. It is quite a feat but it still does not come close to what Kittenger did 50 plus years ago.

Quoting tugger (Reply 22):
Pretty freaky watching him step off from 128,000ft/39,000m and disappear

It made for great television....



OMG-Obama Must Go
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5672 posts, RR: 10
Reply 49, posted (2 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 8018 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
I think we have different definitions what a hero is. A fanatic base jumper which makes stunts for his ego or a company marketing belongs not what i would call a hero.

How does his jump bring forward the mankind? In what way do his actions help someone?

While I wouldn't call him a hero for this, what he has done has brought "space" (yes, I know it's not really space that he jumped from, that is why he called it "edge of space") just a little closer and more into the minds of millions of people around the world. That "space" can be fun or that it can be reached by not just astronauts. It just helps keep it in the mind of people.

I am quite pleased that overall space is being very much kept in the minds of people lately, from Curiosity, to the success of SpaceX, to even reality TV shows trying to put people on Mars, space and beyond earth exploration and settlement is getting a lot of attention lately and some are beginning to accept that space and going to other planets is a normal thing, something that will happen in their lifetime. I think that is incredibly important.

Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
The real feat was Kittingers jump, with 60's technologies in a open balloon and rudimentary equipment(without space suit) not a hermetic warmed up hightech balloon with a high tech suit.


In the sixties they even didn't know what would happen at this heights, it took 52 years to leapfrog his record.

Ummm, for its time Kittinger's jump was just as high tech as this one, and while yes they didn't know "what would happen" that was the entire point of the event. An important distinction between the two is that Baumgartner's jump was civil and not military (aother reason why it wasn't that publicized). That the technology has come that far, that civilian technology can do nowadays what only governments could do before is a big deal. And I don't think Kittinger is being forgotten at all with this jump, if anything this jump has brought that jump back into the public eye, if for however briefly.

So was it an enormous waste of money that could have been spent elsewhere? Was it only an ego trip for one man? I don't know but he did it and it was thrilling for many people who witnessed it. I know airshows inspire many to become pilots or aerospace engineers or go into the military, etc., this will quite likely inspire some to do something similar (engineering, space, whatever).

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlinemd80fanatic From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 2660 posts, RR: 9
Reply 50, posted (2 years 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 7970 times:

I think the most amazing thing about it all is that we finally had another civilian high enough, and carrying a dozen cameras, to see space in all it's glory. Well, lack of glory that is.

Felix said the same thing that all astronauts, since pre-Apollo days, have said, and it's completely gone over the heads of everyone down here, yesterday was no exception. Felix mentioned the deep dark infinite void of space. Blackness without end. Once again not a single mention of what we have all come to understand as being a universe full of stars in all directions. Cameras sometimes have a difficult time with stars, but human eyes do not share the same weakness.

The brightest stars should have been visible to Felix at 24 miles up, whereas there are some days, in broad daylight, when those same bright stars are visible from the surface, seen through 24 miles of atmosphere. Perhaps it's all science "fiction"?

http://images3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120111120243/memoryalpha/en/images/4/4b/Fabrini_old_man.jpg

Congratulations FELIX, excellent job! (I bet he couldn't wait to jump off that thing after 2.5 hours). Welcome home.  


User currently offlineBlueElephant From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 1813 posts, RR: 6
Reply 51, posted (2 years 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 7899 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
I think we have different definitions what a hero is. A fanatic base jumper which makes stunts for his ego or a company marketing belongs not what i would call a hero.
Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
I think we have different definitions what a hero is. A fanatic base jumper which makes stunts for his ego or a company marketing belongs not what i would call a hero.

How does his jump bring forward the mankind? In what way do his actions help someone?

For those of you commenting that the man didn't do anything but a stunt. I would suggest you do some research before posting.

Felix was wearing a next generation space suit, and was TESTING it for the company that designed it (the one that designs spacesuits for current astronauts), he was wearing a ton of telemetry used for understanding how the suit and body react to such high speeds. He was being used as a testbed for high altitude bailouts for future space missions (so that events similar to Columbia could maybe have better outcomes in the future). NASA, a number of spacecraft manufacturers and other space related companies will be informed of all of the data that will be recovered from his jump.

And for those of you think he's not done anything special. He's extended the boundaries of mankind be showing us yet another thing the human body can handle.

While I agree he shouldn't be considered a hero yet, the minute his data is used in potentially saving someone's life, the tag will become valid.

A simple stuntman jumps out of a plane, while Felix tumbled head over heels at the speed of sound.


User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2439 posts, RR: 14
Reply 52, posted (2 years 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 7841 times:

1:350 scale of the whole exercise:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFU774q6eVM


 


David

[Edited 2012-10-15 12:31:17]


Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 53, posted (2 years 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 7810 times:

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 52):
1:350 scale of the whole exercise:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFU77...q6eVM

wow great find!
just amazing! I never thought they would come up with a Lego version!

  



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineautothrust From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 1596 posts, RR: 9
Reply 54, posted (2 years 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 7798 times:

Quoting tugger (Reply 49):
"edge of space"

61km away from the edge of space.

Quoting tugger (Reply 49):

I am quite pleased that overall space is being very much kept in the minds of people lately, from Curiosity, to the success of SpaceX, to even reality TV shows trying to put people on Mars, space and beyond earth exploration and settlement is getting a lot of attention lately

Agree fully with this.

Quoting tugger (Reply 49):
"what would happen" that was the entire point of the event.

The difference : the risk was much higher for Kittinger then for Felix who jumped relaying on the experiences of Kittinger.

Quoting tugger (Reply 49):
it was thrilling for many people who witnessed it

Don't deny that.

Quoting BlueElephant (Reply 51):
Felix was wearing a next generation space suit, and was TESTING it for the company that designed it

Could have been tested in other way's without a RED BULL logos everywhere. It has more a taste of a marketing campaign.
There are sure people more qualifed to do such tests then Felix Baumgartner a Austrian Basejumper which academic level is machinist payed by a Austrian Company.

Quoting BlueElephant (Reply 51):
He's extended the boundaries of mankind be showing us yet another thing the human body can handle.

There are people(Apollo,Gemini, Wostok) which did much more then "just" jumping 8km higher then Kittinger and even they are not all called hero's.

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 47):
In my book, a hero is somebody who has defied real dangers to his health and life

A hero is someone which sacrifies his life or health for the well of other people. (can be a Soldier which gives his life for his team, a person which prevents that children die in a accident, it can be even a animal like dog which saves a person from drowning)

In my honest opinion for example(disregarding religion things) Mother Teresa was a hero. She gave everything and dedicated their life for the real poor.

Also great example of heros: Liquidators of Tschernobyl (unneccesary to mention what had to go trough and what they did for their country and Europe)

[Edited 2012-10-15 13:31:31]


“Faliure is not an option.”
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2439 posts, RR: 14
Reply 55, posted (2 years 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 7772 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 54):
A hero is someone which sacrifies his life or health for the well of other people. (can be a Soldier which gives his life for his team, a person which prevents that children die in a accident, it can be even a animal like dog which saves a person from drowning)

Hmmm, if you stress the point of making a sacrifice, then it's not heroism anymore. Heroism is all about having much more balls than brains. But thats only my opinion and that of the Merriam-Webster dictionary  

1
a : a mythological or legendary figure often of divine descent endowed with great strength or ability
b : an illustrious warrior
c : a man admired for his achievements and noble qualities
d : one who shows great courage
2
a : the principal male character in a literary or dramatic work
b : the central figure in an event, period, or movement
3
plural usually he·ros : submarine 2 ...WTF?
4
: an object of extreme admiration and devotion : idol


Mother Terese had her fair share of criticism: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Mother_Teresa


David

[Edited 2012-10-15 13:43:45]


Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineflyingwaeldar From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2009, 108 posts, RR: 1
Reply 56, posted (2 years 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 7672 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 54):
Could have been tested in other way's without a RED BULL logos everywhere. It has more a taste of a marketing campaign.
There are sure people more qualifed to do such tests then Felix Baumgartner a Austrian Basejumper which academic level is machinist payed by a Austrian Company.

Would you've been happier if there were NASA or USAF logos all over instead of Red Bull? At least this was sponsored by a private company and no tax dollars (or Euros) were wasted.

Also what does Felix academic level has to do with anything? Should we only allow people with university degrees to attempt feats like this?
Chuck Yeager who was the first person to (officially) break the sound barrier exactly 65 years ago didn't have a university education and still is regarded as a hero by many.

And I also think that a lot of people who followed this have heard about Joe Kittinger for the first time in their life and I guess he was quite happy to be involved in this project.

As flyingturtle has already mentioned maybe you should reserach your heroes before putting them on a pedestal and denying other people a space there...............

My opinion only.


User currently offlineautothrust From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 1596 posts, RR: 9
Reply 57, posted (2 years 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 7604 times:

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 55):
Heroism is all about having much more balls than brains.

There are thousends of people which would have done such a jump. In what way does being stupid or risk friendly (for his ego or kick)make a hero of one?

Jumping out of a ballon is not the same then going to Afghanistan to fight the Taliban or help the people.

The Tschernobyl liquidators were exposed up to 21 Sievert and they risked their life for the future of their people.

That needs balls, but they did it for the genereal good.

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 55):
a man admired for his achievements and noble qualities

noble qualities from helping other people, what else would this noble qualities meaningful?

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 55):
one who shows great courage

courage comes in hand with risking someting for the other, anything else makes no sense.

Makes me a hero when i jump from the Mount Everest for my own interest, with a Glider? Doubtful.

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 55):
object of extreme admiration and devotion : idol

then any so-called "superstar" eg. Madonna, Justin Bieber, Tom Hanks etc.. would be heros? Seriously, you can't believe that yourself.



“Faliure is not an option.”
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 58, posted (2 years 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 7603 times:

If I was him, I would want to bloody stay up there! I would just look down whilst shaking my head and thinking 'what an insane world!'!

    Wow!   



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlinegarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined exactly 11 years ago today! , 5404 posts, RR: 53
Reply 59, posted (2 years 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 7556 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 54):

The difference : the risk was much higher for Kittinger then for Felix who jumped relaying on the experiences of Kittinger.

And Kittinger's jump relied on data from Operation High Dive and Project Manhigh. Really though, does the fact that a mission is a logical, evolutionary step forward make it less grand? Were the early Gemini astronauts somehow lesser astronauts because much of what they'd been done had been laid out by Project Mercury? Is Hicham El Guerrouj somehow a lesser runner than Roger Bannister because Bannister already ran a mile under the 4 minute mark and El Guerrouj was just relying on that base of knowledge?

Quoting autothrust (Reply 54):

There are sure people more qualifed to do such tests then Felix Baumgartner a Austrian Basejumper which academic level is machinist payed by a Austrian Company.

Interestingly, daredevils were some of the first people that were considered as potential astronaut trainees. As previously mentioned, Yeager had no college experience (and was a mechanic prior to applying for enlisted pilot training) and John Glenn was a college dropout. As someone with technical, undergraduate, and graduate degrees, I'd argue a natural aptitude for something is just as important, if not more so, than an academic qualification.

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 55):
plural usually he·ros : submarine 2 ...WTF?

They mean a sub sandwich (aka hero, hoagie, grinder, torpedo, etc)



South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
User currently offlineautothrust From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 1596 posts, RR: 9
Reply 60, posted (2 years 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 7529 times:

Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 59):
Project Manhigh

What's your point, it was Kittinger which jumped first in the project Manhigh.

So Kittinger relied on data of his previous mission?

Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 59):
Were the early Gemini astronauts somehow lesser astronauts because much of what they'd been done had been laid out by Project Mercury?

Of course not. You cannot compare it with Kittinger vs Baumgartner. The diffrence .....52 years and high tech comfy ballon and space suit.

Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 59):
, I'd argue a natural aptitude for something is just as important, if not more so, than an academic qualification.

It is important, however i doubt John Glenn or Chuck Yeager would have been capable to survive the Apollo 13 disaster.

The crew of Apollo 13 were highly skilled as well great academic background.

Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 59):
Interestingly, daredevils were some of the first people that were considered as potential astronaut trainees.

They were very soon dismissed. The requirements for astronauts were set incredible high.



“Faliure is not an option.”
User currently offlinegarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined exactly 11 years ago today! , 5404 posts, RR: 53
Reply 61, posted (2 years 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 7491 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 60):

What's your point, it was Kittinger which jumped first in the project Manhigh.

So Kittinger relied on data of his previous mission?

Actually there were no jumps in Manhigh, just an ascent, only one of which was done by Kittinger. My point is, that at the end of the day, many things are derivative of work that's been previously done. Yet it doesn't make it any less impressive. After all, to be reductive, all high-altitude balloon work is merely derivative of what Auguste Piccard did which is, in turn, stems from work originally done by the Montgolfier Brothers in the 18th century. It's silly to attempt to minimize something through reduction in this manner, in my opinion, just as it's silly to minimize Baumgartner's accomplishments.

Quoting autothrust (Reply 60):

Of course not. You cannot compare it with Kittinger vs Baumgartner. The diffrence .....52 years and high tech comfy ballon and space suit.

And 52 years ago, someone like you very well may have been poo-pooing Kittinger's "high tech comfy balloon and space suit." If there's a manned mission to Mars within our lifetime shall we attempt to minimize those astronauts in their "high tech comfy capsule and space suit" in comparison to what the Apollo astronauts had?

Quoting autothrust (Reply 60):

It is important, however i doubt John Glenn or Chuck Yeager would have been capable to survive the Apollo 13 disaster.

The crew of Apollo 13 were highly skilled as well great academic background.

Not particularly, especially in comparison to guys like Armstrong, Duke, or Schmitt. Lovell had two years at Wisconsin before finishing up at the Naval Academy and graduating with a BS. Haise had a BS in Aeronautical Engineering from Oklahoma. Only Swigert had a postgraduate degree (a masters from RPI). Despite that, I think your minimization of Glenn or Yeager does them both a tremendous disservice.



South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 62, posted (2 years 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 7487 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 60):
They were very soon dismissed. The requirements for astronauts were set incredible high.

Depending what kind of high you are talking about. High finances also qualifies some to be astronauts that would never be selected otherwise.

Singer Sarah Brightman has spent $51M for her seat in the Soyuz outbidding a NASA astronaut.

Clown and entertainer Cirque du Soleil Guy Laliberté has spent $35M for his seat on a Soyuz. The cost took a steep hyke between the two flights.

I wish Red Bull would finance Felix Baumgartner to go to the International Space Station. If a singer and a clown can do it me thinks he should be going there too.

The man will have no fear of speed and spins and reaching high Mach speed on descent.

I would be happy to see Felix Baumgartner travelling to Space on a Soyuz. I feel he deserves it more than these other Space tourists. I highly doubt he would be able to finance himself without the help of a rich sponsor.

Next time I run into Mr Dietrich Mateschitz (Red Bull owner) at a Formula 1 Grand Prix I will certainly suggest to him that he spend the money on another worthy Red Bull sponsorship.

     



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineautothrust From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 1596 posts, RR: 9
Reply 63, posted (2 years 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 7467 times:

Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 61):
at the end of the day, many things are derivative of work that's been previously done.

Agree, however i disagree with:

Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 61):
Baumgartner's accomplishments.

Which accomplishments?????? Jumping out of a ballon, that's not what i would call an accomplishment.      


The comparison was to Chuck Yeager or John Glenn and not Neil Armstrong, Duke or Schmitt.

Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 61):
Haise had a BS in Aeronautical Engineering from Oklahoma.
Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 61):
Only Swigert had a postgraduate degree

Lovell had a huge experience, more then Armstrong.Swigert had the biggest knowledge of the service modul then any other astronaut.

I recommend anyone to read Jim Lovells Book(Lost Moon) about the massive requirements and "tortures, test and seleccion" they had to go trough to be astronaut.

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 62):
Singer Sarah Brightman has spent $51M for her seat in the Soyuz outbidding a NASA astronaut.

Sorry but i'm talking about real astronauts and not a VIP which buys a ticket. No such VIP could take control of Soyuz in a emergency an dock manually to the ISS.



“Faliure is not an option.”
User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 615 posts, RR: 0
Reply 64, posted (2 years 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 7447 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 63):
Sorry but i'm talking about real astronauts and not a VIP which buys a ticket. No such VIP could take control of Soyuz in a emergency an dock manually to the ISS.


So by taking your definition to its logical conclusion, a not insignificant number of the fine men and women who have rocketed into space are not "real astronauts". I am sure the mission specialists and such who are not trained as pilots "could take control of Soyuz in a emergency an dock manually to the ISS"...not.
I am not saying that the space tourists should or should not be classified as astronauts, just that your sweeping statement is terribly inaccurate and uncalled for.

Anyway as per wiki, an astronaut or cosmonaut (or taikonaut for that matter) is a person trained by a human spaceflight program to command, pilot, or serve as a crew member of a spacecraft. While generally reserved for professional space travelers, the terms are sometimes applied to anyone who travels into space, including scientists, politicians, journalists, and tourists. With the rise of space tourism, NASA and the Russian Federal Space Agency agreed to use the term "spaceflight participant" to distinguish those space travelers from professional astronauts on missions coordinated by those two agencies.



Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlineSemaex From Germany, joined Nov 2009, 823 posts, RR: 2
Reply 65, posted (2 years 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 7446 times:

One question:
Did he start tumbling after he hit the sound barrier or why was that so? The initial part of the jump seemed very stable, only in the intermediate part (I'm guessing between 70,000 and 40,000ft) he slipped into this uncontrollable motion.

Quoting autothrust (Reply 44):
I think we have different definitions what a hero is. A fanatic base jumper which makes stunts for his ego or a company marketing belongs not what i would call a hero.

How does his jump bring forward the mankind? In what way do his actions help someone?

Well some people call soldiers "heroes", just for the fact that they are soldiers. I never really got that kind of patriotism which makes one think he/she is a "hero" for fulfilling the will of superinflated politicians. But that's up to the individual to decide.
I wouldn't call Felix a hero per se, but I'm quite sure that kids were staring at a TV screen that moment he jumped and were having all kinds at thunderstorms in their head which may lead them - in 30, 40, 50 years - to innovate something that will greatly benefit mankind. Kids above all others need examples, people who go over the edge to tell others that things thought impossible are doable. The seed has been sawn, and that is what matters.

Plus, Felix Baumgartner really is a shining star on the flag of the Austrian nation. I have many many friends from that small alpine country, and for the first time since Falco these folks have a national fellow they can look up to, someone who's alive. It gives hope to an otherwise bautiful nation that is unfortunately torn, corrupted and rusting very badly from the inside.

Quoting md80fanatic (Reply 50):
Congratulations FELIX, excellent job! (I bet he couldn't wait to jump off that thing after 2.5 hours). Welcome home.

2.5? I hear he was in that suit for more than 7 hours!

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 58):
If I was him, I would want to bloody stay up there! I would just look down whilst shaking my head and thinking 'what an insane world!'!

  
A couple of years ago a German Astronaut (Thomas Reiter) was up on the ISS for a couple of months (which was a big event, as Germans are not as fortunate on the matter as other nations with big space programs). Once a week he did a live video stream from up there, where you could ask questions, whatever it is, and I remember him saying something very interesting. Let my try to recapture and translate as appropriate...
"Sometimes when I look down on the Earth I think about the problems that every single human has in his life, and I think how negligibly small they are in the grand scheme of things."



// You know you're an aviation enthusiast when you look at your neighbour's cars and think about fleet commonality.
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 66, posted (2 years 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 7436 times:

Quoting Semaex (Reply 65):
A couple of years ago a German Astronaut (Thomas Reiter) was up on the ISS for a couple of months (which was a big event, as Germans are not as fortunate on the matter as other nations with big space programs). Once a week he did a live video stream from up there, where you could ask questions, whatever it is, and I remember him saying something very interesting. Let my try to recapture and translate as appropriate...
"Sometimes when I look down on the Earth I think about the problems that every single human has in his life, and I think how negligibly small they are in the grand scheme of things."

I remember Thomas Reiter very well from his missions. One of the finest ESA astronauts. I followed his launch and his time on board the ISS.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/expeditions/expedition13/

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sh...ttlemissions/archives/sts-121.html

He now has a very high position with ESA as Director of Human Spaceflight and Operations (European Space Agency) which he really deserves.

I so much wish Felix Baumgartner could get a seat in a Soyuz going to the Inernational Space Station.

        



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently online9VSIO From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 722 posts, RR: 2
Reply 67, posted (2 years 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 7268 times:
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Quoting autothrust (Reply 54):
Could have been tested in other way's without a RED BULL logos everywhere. It has more a taste of a marketing campaign.

Sure it could have been tested. Just the question of funding.

Quoting autothrust (Reply 63):
Which accomplishments?????? Jumping out of a ballon, that's not what i would call an accomplishment.

Didn't he also fly across the channel on a wing?

I think that at the end of the day, heroes have to inspire, and that should be their only requirement to be called "hero". After all, how many of us looked up to our parents as heroes when we were younger?  



Me: (Lining up on final) I shall now select an aiming point. || Instructor: Well, I hope it's the runway...
User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 68, posted (1 year 11 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 6094 times:

Quoting autothrust (Reply 54):
A hero is someone which sacrifies his life or health for the well of other people. (can be a Soldier which gives his life for his team, a person which prevents that children die in a accident, it can be even a animal like dog which saves a person from drowning)

I think if you were to ask a thousand people what a "hero" is, you would doubtless hear a thousand DIFFERENT answers;
all of which points to a simple fact; it's all a "matter of opinion".............

So when many people think of Felix Baumgartner as a hero, they are ALL expressing THEIR opinion, ( an opinion to which I think everyone is entitled to.) But when someone else attempts to say, "your opinion is wrong; I have a different opinion, and MY opinion is RIGHT !

And all of this talk about "space" ? ( I never could figure out why they call it "space"; I call it "nothing"......there's "nothing" OUT THERE ! )

I have never been to 128,000 feet; and I haven't been to 200,000 feet, or to 200,000 miles, kilometers, or light years either;
(but my best guess is, if you ever "get" to ANY of those places, and if you stick your head out, they're ALL going to "seem" to be pretty much alike ! ) ( absolutely NOTHING !)

So, let's all read the single most inspiring statement on this whole thread one more time.......

Quoting Semaex (Reply 65):
Plus, Felix Baumgartner really is a shining star on the flag of the Austrian nation. I have many many friends from that small alpine country, and for the first time since Falco these folks have a national fellow they can look up to, someone who's alive. It gives hope to an otherwise bautiful nation that is unfortunately torn, corrupted and rusting very badly from the inside.

I could never say it any better than that, so I'm not going to try............

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 615 posts, RR: 0
Reply 69, posted (1 year 11 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5983 times:

Quoting Geezer (Reply 68):
I think if you were to ask a thousand people what a "hero" is, you would doubtless hear a thousand DIFFERENT answers;
all of which points to a simple fact; it's all a "matter of opinion".............

....and Genghis Khan was a hero to his Mongol people & nation but an evil slaughterer to his enemies & the conquered.



Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 70, posted (1 year 11 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 5956 times:

There was a noticeable difference on how Felix Baumgartner could not control his position during the supersonic phase of free fall when he was totally disordered even rather violently, and this changed when he got to the point of subsonic free fall when he regained control of himself and his position in free fall.

  

I wonder if he will ever attempt another new record trying to surpass his own supersonic free falling speed.

  



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10905 posts, RR: 37
Reply 71, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 5557 times:

From Red Bull Stratos:

Please vote Felix Baumgartner TIME's Person of the Year 2012

Enter your vote here: http://win.gs/SsHflQ

I think he really deserves the title!

     



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
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Reply To This Topic Felix Baumgartner Set For Skydive Record Attempt
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