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Throttle Position Terminology - "Around The Horn"  
User currently offlinesmokeonreadynow From United States of America, joined Sep 2012, 4 posts, RR: 0
Posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 3747 times:

Hello,
I am curious about the phrase "around the horn." I have heard and read many references to this term in the context of engine starts, flameouts, re-lights, etc., but I have never found a good explanation of precisely what it means.

I was thinking perhaps the "horn" is some kind of detent commonly found on jet throttles, or maybe an engine instrument indication of some kind. Can anyone shed some light on this for me? Many thanks in advance. Apologies if this is more properly discussed in Tech-ops; I wasn't sure.

6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9545 posts, RR: 42
Reply 1, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3621 times:

I found an example, rather than an explanation:

http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/gram...960s/1968/Pages%20from%20dec68.pdf

It seems to refer to moving the throttles between Idle and Cut-off on some aircraft. Perhaps a horn sounded if the throttles were moved into that region?


User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3539 times:

Quoting smokeonreadynow (Thread starter):
I was thinking perhaps the "horn" is some kind of detent commonly found on jet throttles,

That's basically what it is. On the F-14 throttle quadrant there's a stop in front of the cutout position. When starting the engines you push the throttle outboard, forward then back inboard again to the idle position. Hence the term "around the horn" since the stop kind of looks like a horn. Kind of.

[Edited 2013-02-20 10:37:37]

User currently offlinelegs From Australia, joined Jun 2006, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 3494 times:

We've always called it 'going over the hump' from cut-off then back against the idle stop after lifting a lockout with your forefinger, like LMP737 described. Our engine runners and pilots generally call it out during engine start, and use that as a time hack for starter cut-out, light-off etc.

Ive got some experience with similar sorts of systems with 'soft detents' (my words) for afterburner engagement as well.

[Edited 2013-02-20 12:48:43]

User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 3474 times:

Quoting legs (Reply 3):
We've always called it 'going over the hump' from cut-off then back against the idle stop after lifting a lockout with your forefinger

Sounds like an F-18 thing.  


User currently offlinelegs From Australia, joined Jun 2006, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 3403 times:

Quoting LMP737 (Reply 4):
like an F-18 thing

It is indeed  

We used the same terminology back in the F-111 days too, though the it was the top portion of the throttle that you had to lift up to get from cutoff to idle.


User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 3373 times:

Quoting legs (Reply 5):
It is indeed

We used the same terminology back in the F-111 days too, though the it was the top portion of the throttle that you had to lift up to get from cutoff to idle.

Watching nugget F-18 pilots land on the boat was always fun. They would get a death grip on the trottle and go right through the mil stop into burner. The Hornt would be sitting there in the wire in full burner.  


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