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V-2 Rocket Development History  
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12267 posts, RR: 25
Posted (1 year 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 4210 times:

I hadn't considered how a liquid fueled rocket works, but the articles on Wikipedia are enough to give me a basic understanding of it. One thing that impressed me was how many aspects of technology came together on the V-2:

Quote:

Various design issues were identified and solved during V-2 development and testing:
> To reduce tank pressure and weight, high flow turbopumps were used to boost pressure.[2]:35
> A short and lighter combustion chamber without burn-through was developed by using centrifugal injection nozzles, a mixing compartment, and a converging nozzle to the throat for homogeneous combustion.[14]:51
> Film cooling was used to prevent burn through at the nozzle throat.[14]:52
> Relay contacts were made more durable to withstand vibration and prevent thrust cutoff just after lift-off.[14]:52
> Ensuring that the fuel pipes had tension-free curves reduced the likelihood of explosions at 4,000–6,000 ft (1,219–1,829 m).[14]:215,217
> Fins were shaped with clearance to prevent damage as the exhaust jet expanded with altitude.[14]:56,118
> To control trajectory at liftoff and supersonic speeds, heat-resistant graphite vanes were used as rudders in the exhaust jet.[14]:35,58

Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V-2

Can anyone comment on if a lot of these issues had known soluctions before V-2, or was it really that successful at coming up with revolutionary solutions to the problems?

What role did Von Braun play, mostly an overall system architect, or as one who came up with innovation to solve the individual challenges, or both?

Can anyone recommend a good book covering the various contributions of the V-2 team as well as the work of Goddard over the formative years, let's say late 20s to mid 40s?


Inspiration, move me brightly!
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12128 posts, RR: 52
Reply 1, posted (1 year 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 4132 times:

Try this web site for pre-WWII, WWII, and post-WWII development and operations of the A-4 rocket (V-2).

http://www.zamandayolculuk.com/cetinbal/V2RROCKET.htm


User currently offlinerwy04lga From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (1 year 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4105 times:

My dad was part of the DE-development of the V-2. He was shot down on August 4, 1944 just after bombing Peenemunde in a B-17G of the 601BS/398BG. MACR 7707

[Edited 2013-06-14 15:57:55]


Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12128 posts, RR: 52
Reply 3, posted (1 year 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 3748 times:

Quoting rwy04lga (Reply 2):
My dad was part of the DE-development of the V-2. He was shot down on August 4, 1944 just after bombing Peenemunde in a B-17G of the 601BS/398BG.

The B-17 crews who brought the war to Germany were very brave men. The 8th Air Force had a higher casualty rate and number than the entire US Marine Corp during WWII.

The V-2 (A-4) rocket was one of the few weapons ever developed that went beyond the leading edge of technology at the time it entered operational service. The only other weapon of WWII that is also beyond the leading edge of technology for the time was the two A-Bombs (Little Boy and Fat Man). Fat Man was the most advanced of the two.

Had the USS Indianapolis, CA35, which transported major portions of Little Boy, been sunk just one week before she was historically sunk, then the first A-Bomb dropped would have been the Fat Man.

All of the Fat Man components had been transported to Tinian Island by 509th Bomb Group B-29s. The remaining parts of Little Boy were also transported by the 509th, but in their C-54s.


User currently offlinerwy04lga From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (1 year 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3498 times:

Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 3):
All of the Fat Man components had been transported to Tinian Island by 509th Bomb Group B-29s. The remaining parts of Little Boy were also transported by the 509th, but in their C-54s.

Just finished watching 'Above and Beyond'...great movie. A few years ago, I helped check-in LTC Paul W. Tibbetts, IV. I asked, 'Is there a 5th?' Shuffled into view was 5 year old PWT, V. I then asked, 'Did they meet?' IV said 'Yes, just before III died.' Interesting day.



Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
User currently offlinePITingres From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1114 posts, RR: 13
Reply 5, posted (1 year 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 3429 times:

Quoting Revelation (Thread starter):
Can anyone recommend a good book covering the various contributions of the V-2 team as well as the work of Goddard over the formative years, let's say late 20s to mid 40s?

It's been a while since I read it, but Willy Ley's "Rockets, Missles, and Space Travel" isn't a bad start. I think it comes in numerous editions with slight title variations.



Fly, you fools! Fly!
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12267 posts, RR: 25
Reply 6, posted (1 year 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3397 times:

Quoting PITingres (Reply 5):
It's been a while since I read it, but Willy Ley's "Rockets, Missles, and Space Travel" isn't a bad start. I think it comes in numerous editions with slight title variations.

I'll have to seek it out. I have a copy of Dornberger's V-2 book coming in the mail soon, and Ley was the ghost-writer for that.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (1 year 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3385 times:

Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 3):
The V-2 (A-4) rocket was one of the few weapons ever developed that went beyond the leading edge of technology at the time it entered operational service. The only other weapon of WWII that is also beyond the leading edge of technology for the time was the two A-Bombs (Little Boy and Fat Man). Fat Man was the most advanced of the two.

Yes, Fat Man was indeed more advanced. Also a big risk at the time. Little Boy was a simple gun device that didn't really need testing (good, really, since pure U-235 was pretty scarce). So it was decided that it would be armed in flight by Deke Parsons, a USN officer who was familiar with the overall gun system in use.

As for Fat Man, the circuit harness needed to ensure implosion was, at the time, pretty hairy. Arming in flight, particularly if in turbulence, was iffy. So the decision was made to arm the weapon on the ground. A take-off accident by Sweeney et al could have been spectacular.

Quoting PITingres (Reply 5):
It's been a while since I read it, but Willy Ley's "Rockets, Missles, and Space Travel" isn't a bad start. I think it comes in numerous editions with slight title variations.

Still have my copy !   



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7033 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (1 year 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 3348 times:

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 7):
A take-off accident by Sweeney et al could have been spectacular.

Pity that didn't happen, it would have been far better than what did. The Japanese would have learnt about it and probably sued for peace knowing the horrors that would happen on the Japanese mainland if they didn't.


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12267 posts, RR: 25
Reply 9, posted (1 year 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3232 times:

Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 3):
The V-2 (A-4) rocket was one of the few weapons ever developed that went beyond the leading edge of technology at the time it entered operational service. The only other weapon of WWII that is also beyond the leading edge of technology for the time was the two A-Bombs (Little Boy and Fat Man). Fat Man was the most advanced of the two.

Depends on what you mean by 'beyond the leading edge'.

Clearly the developments in radar during WWII were phenomenal. Before the war the basics were understood and in practice only for long range detection, after the war, radars were small enough to be carried airborne and were used successfully to decimate the U-boat fleet.

Then there's the ME-262, the first effective jet fighter. The only reason it wasn't more of a problem is that the Allies already had air superiority. Note that the Germans could not invade England because they did not have air superiority, so it follows that the Allies could not have invaded France had the ME262 been available early enough to shift the balance in the air war.

Eisenhower also said that the V1 and V2 could have made a difference - if they were aimed at the English Channel ports instead of London...

Another technology that I think of as a breakthrough was that the Germans used a 'smart bomb' to sink a ship. Well, not tremendously smart. It was dropped from a bomber and had a TV camera that allowed it to be guided by an operator in the bomber. However it proved a lot of technologies. The inventors deliberately hid it from the leadership because they did not feel the tech was mature enough to roll it out broadly.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlinerwy04lga From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (1 year 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 3050 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 9):
Then there's the ME-262, the first effective jet fighter. The only reason it wasn't more of a problem is that the Allies already had air superiority. Note that the Germans could not invade England because they did not have air superiority, so it follows that the Allies could not have invaded France had the ME262 been available early enough to shift the balance in the air war.

That was one of the plot lines in the movie 'Command Decision', with Clark Gable, Van Johnson, and Walter Pidgeon.

[Edited 2013-06-26 19:06:02]


Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
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