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14 Victories In 13 Days; Story Of Joe Foss  
User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Posted (1 year 6 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4215 times:

This link will take you to the remarkable story of WW 2 Marine Corps aviator Joe Foss. You can read how Joe Foss shot down 14 Japanese planes in just 13 days, how he was shot down himself and almost drowned, and how he between 9 October and 19 October, shot down 23 Japanese planes and damaged others that were considered "probables". Foss was awarded the DFC for his actions at Guadalcanal, and in May of 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt awarded Joe Foss the Medal Of Honor. Joe Foss ended up scoring 26 aerial victories, the most of any American pilot during WW 2.

It's quite a story.

http://acepilots.com/usmc_foss.html


Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinemechatnew From United States of America, joined May 2005, 103 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (1 year 6 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 4099 times:

Thanks for the link. Great story about one of America finest combat pilots.

User currently offlinejohns624 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 957 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 6 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 4065 times:

Quoting Geezer (Thread starter):
Joe Foss ended up scoring 26 aerial victories, the most of any American pilot during WW 2.

Nope. He was seventh on the list. Bong, Maguire, Gabreski and a few others beat him out. He was the highest scoring Marine ace.


User currently offlinecmb56 From United States of America, joined Dec 2009, 233 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 5 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3671 times:

Joe Foss and others who served during the early days of WWII fought the toughest of battles. They in many cases were out numbered and faced an enemy flying higher performance aircraft. They succeeded by skill and also by using tactics that favored the strengths they could control. In the case of Joe Foss the F4F Wildcat fighter was slower and less maneuverable than the zero but it had much better armor and heavier guns. One pass and haul ass ruled the day, don't mix with the Zeros and you could both be successful and survive.

User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 3531 times:

Quoting johns624 (Reply 2):
Nope. He was seventh on the list. Bong, Maguire, Gabreski and a few others beat him out. He was the highest scoring Marine ace.

I'll take your word for that; Speaking of Richard Bong, I was privileged to see him fly his P-38 on several occasions at old Wright Field; in fact, on the day I witnessed the crash of the CW Acender at Wright Field, Major Bong, (with a buddy crammed into the cockpit right behind him), was right behind and following the plane that crashed.

Francis Gabreski spent some time at "The Field" (as it was referred to at the time) that summer also, and was a very popular figure due to his marvelous personality, but I don't remember hearing as much about him as I did about Dick Bong; sadly, Bong later lost his life in the crash of either an F-80, or a T-33 (?) during the next few years; I remember reading about it while doing some research, and I seem to remember that the crash was due to something that Bong had neglected to do, but I don't recall the circumstances at the moment.



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlinecmb56 From United States of America, joined Dec 2009, 233 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 3269 times:

As I recall the story Dick Bong was flying an early P-80 which had a tendancy to fail the primary fuel pump on the engine. There was a secondary pump that needed to be ON as well. Dick apparently did not have the secondary pump on and the primary failed shortly after take off. He attempted to bail out but became tangled in the tail and went down with the plane.

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