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Chinook HC2A Tilt & Personnel  
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4313 times:


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Photo © CHRIS CLARKE


The Above Pic shows the HC2A Chinook Helicopter in a steep Angle with its personnel standing near the Door.
Whats going on & is there a deliberate attempt at trying something.
regds
MEL


Think of the brighter side!
22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineVimanav From India, joined Jul 2003, 1516 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4254 times:

 Wow! WOW Man!!!

I'm zapped and blowed if I know!

rgds//Vimanav



Sarfaroshi kii tamannaa ab hamaare dil mein hai, Dekhnaa hai zor kitnaa baazu-e-qaatil mein hai
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29795 posts, RR: 58
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 3974 times:

Damm, I didn't know they could do that.

Closest thing I have seen is photos of some USCG ship tow experiments, and hovercraft tows on the north slope of Alaska. But those helo's where tied to something really really big.




OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineDL021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11447 posts, RR: 75
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 3972 times:
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This photo was featured in a previous thread and it was pretty incredible then as well as now.

One of the Chinook pilots told me that the D-model CH-47 was the fastest helicopter in our inventory if one was willing to put it on its nose while in forward flight....I never really believed him until now.

I bet the crew chief in the window is going over his mental checklist to make sure that he did not forget anything during preflight maintenance.....that and praying to God that the pilot is as good as he thinks he is.

It would be a hell of a ride in the door like that.



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineWannabe From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 677 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 3960 times:

How long can you do this and maintain altitude, or is at trade off of height for speed? And do you change your pants when you're done?

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 5, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3847 times:

Exactly how is lift mantained at that Angle.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineDL021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11447 posts, RR: 75
Reply 6, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 3829 times:
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Lift is not dependent upon angle as the rotory wings are creating lift by being propelled in their arcs.

Do you understand how lift works? Not being smart assed but I think if you dont it bears discussion and would make it clearer.



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 7, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3809 times:

Do you understand how lift works?
Sure do  Smile
But look at the pic,consider the weight of the Helicopter & imagine its weight & the height from the surface.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineSATL382G From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 3793 times:

Looks like a simple case of Thrust vs Drag & Weight vs. Lift. Just that in this case there is a lot of drag involved.

I wonder what an autorotation or engine shutdown looks like. It's got to be ugly.


User currently offlineDL021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11447 posts, RR: 75
Reply 9, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 3778 times:
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MEL, I truly was not trying to be an ass there when I asked the question, and reading my post my curtness could be interpreted as rudeness. Not intended, so please accept apologies if you felt a slight.

THe forward tilt assists in the initial acceleration of the aircraft when transitioning from the hover. The drag is not so much of a factor when accelerating from hover, and as the aircraft reaches cruising speed it will be flown at a more level attitude.

One engine shutdown does not have a catastrophic impact as the engines are both connected to the rotor drive shaft. It does present a problem when one engine is being used to lift a fully loaded aircraft at higher altitudes.



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 10, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 3760 times:

DL021......No Apoligies needed.Sometimes words sound different. [Chk my Signature]  Big thumbs up

I agree & Understand unless there is a sudden Thrust drop nothing serious could happen,But the question arose from the 2nd pic near the water surface,similiar to the question raised on a DC10 #2 Engine mounted on the Vertical Stablizer,when we look and say,can it hold the Engine [Although we know it can]
Cheers

regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineSATL382G From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 3749 times:

THe forward tilt assists in the initial acceleration of the aircraft when transitioning from the hover. The drag is not so much of a factor when accelerating from hover, and as the aircraft reaches cruising speed it will be flown at a more level attitude.

One engine shutdown does not have a catastrophic impact as the engines are both connected to the rotor drive shaft. It does present a problem when one engine is being used to lift a fully loaded aircraft at higher altitudes.


We are talking about the picture in reply #2 correct? And we all see that massive bit of drag at the far end of the cable right?  Smile/happy/getting dizzy


User currently offlineDL021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11447 posts, RR: 75
Reply 12, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 3726 times:
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Sorry, I was focussed on the photo in the originating post.

Yes, obviously that one would present some issues that the additional torque would be of extreme help.  Smile



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 13, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 3690 times:

Which countries operate the Chinook HC2A.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineDL021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11447 posts, RR: 75
Reply 14, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3657 times:
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The HC2A is a British designation for the CH-47D Chinook with Special Operations mods.

Chinook users include:

USA (D,F)
The Netherlands (D)
Italy (C)
Canada(?)
Spain (D)
UK (D equivelant)
Greece (C,D)
Egypt (C Italian made)
Italy (C,D)
Japan (D)
Australia (D)
Singapore (D)
Argentina (C)
Republic of China (Taiwan) (D)
Morocco (?)
Iran (C)
Lybia (C Italian made)



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineBsergonomics From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2002, 462 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3646 times:

Humble opinion coming up...

I reckon that this helo is in a (more or less) max rate dive.

Reasoning:

1. The rotor blades seem to be in a forward flight configuration; i.e., the rotorblade at the pointy end of the aircraft is more bent upwards than usual, while the other blades are rotating in more or less their normal configuration. If it was in level flight, one would expect all three blades to be almost maxed out (or, at least, the blades at the rear would be bent further 'upwards'), as if it were performing a vertical take-off.

2. The crew chief/loadmaster (visible in the door), while holding on, appears to be standing more or less straight. If the aircraft was in forward flight, one would expect him to have his hips hanging down slightly.

3. Helicopters will maintain constant altitude up to incredible angles. However, I reckon that this one is too far over to maintain level flight.

Bearing in mind the aircraft's mission, it would not surprise me in the least if this was practicing the helo equivalent of the Sarajevo landing (fall out of the sky, under power, and plonk it on the ground), somewhere near Odiham.

Like I said, this is only a guess (haven't yet worked with the Shìthook) and feel free to disagree.



The definition of a 'Pessimist': an Optimist with experience...
User currently offlineJet-a gasguy From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 266 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3671 times:

Having worked on and flown in Chinooks for a few years, I can tell you that the aircraft is in a dive and not in a normal flight configuration. For the "D" model, even at max speed with the nose down, the aircraft's attitude is NOWHERE near as steep as that. Not sure why they're performing such a maneuver, but it has to be something extreme. While in the US army, we never took our birds to maneuvers of that extreme. If I was in that aircraft, the dive wouldn't scare me, but having to pull out of it would. The stress on the rotor system must have been incredible!

J-AGG



Find a job you love, and you'll never work a day in your life.
User currently offlineTnsaf From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 123 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3563 times:

Canada sold ours to the Netherlands.


700 hours and counting...
User currently offlineDl021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11447 posts, RR: 75
Reply 18, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3559 times:
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Tnsaf....thanks for that. I was wondering about how The Netherlands got theirs and where the Canadian order went.

How long did Canada operate them, or did they immediately dispose of them?

Were they part of the Canadian Army in Germany?



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineTnsaf From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 123 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3545 times:

I can't give you exact dates, but they were operated from the early 70's to the early 90's. They were parked during the defense cuts of the early 90's. They parked them at the Mountainview storage base and it took a couple of years to move them.

The two main operating bases were CFB Ottawa (Uplands) and CFB Edmonton (Namao). They may have made it over to Europe on exercise, but if that happened it was very rare.

I actually got 3 rides in the ones based in Ottawa. Great machines and you could hear them coming for miles. They would make the whole house shake!



700 hours and counting...
User currently offlineLongbowPilot From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 577 posts, RR: 4
Reply 20, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 3523 times:
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hey guys,

What you are seeing is a snap shot in time. There is no way the Chinook or any aircraft can maintain that attitude. What you are seeing is a "stunt" that RAF pilots do in thier airshow demos. I have a video of one doing that. What you are seeing is what a pilot does after a bump. The chinook is a very powerful airframe that can lift it's own weight. When it isn't loaded it is a quite capable aircraft... here is the video.

[url]http://www.flightlevel350.com/picwindow.php?cat=20&pic=1577[/URL]


User currently offlineGPHOTO From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 829 posts, RR: 25
Reply 21, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 3519 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Corrected link format:

http://www.flightlevel350.com/picwindow.php?cat=20&pic=1577

Best regards,

Jim



Erm, is this thing on?
User currently offlineHaveBlue From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2106 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (9 years 7 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 3499 times:

Cool video of the Chinook LongBowPilot!

Especially the roll on landing and subsequent reverse take off at 2:40minutes and the neg G pushover to steep nose down like the original picture at 4:20minutes.

Good stuff.



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