Sponsor Message:
Military Aviation & Space Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
How Long Will The ISS Be Used?  
User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3763 posts, RR: 29
Posted (8 years 10 months 1 hour ago) and read 4683 times:

The Columbia disaster undoubtedly slowed down the ISS project extremely, but I am very confident it will be completed anyway, of course only if the shuttle missions are succesful (something I am very sure about).

But how long will the ISS be used? Certainly nobody invests billions of dollars to retire a station in 2015 when it is completed in 2010, on the other hands the oldest modules were launched in 1998 already if I remember it correctly. MIR was used much longer than it was designed for, and despite the problems this worked out somehow.

So, are there realistical plans on when the ISS will be retired again? My opinion is, as long as it is no danger for the crew, keep it up. This thing should stay in orbit permanently. But what are the real plans?

3 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4653 times:

Quoting TheSonntag (Thread starter):
But how long will the ISS be used? Certainly nobody invests billions of dollars to retire a station in 2015 when it is completed in 2010, on the other hands the oldest modules were launched in 1998 already if I remember it correctly. MIR was used much longer than it was designed for, and despite the problems this worked out somehow.

Assuming that a future President or Congress doesn't cancel or stall the Constellation program, NASA says it will discontinue use of ISS in 2016. Our international partners have not signed on to that plan, so ISS could well continue operations at ISS beyond that date without the US. It seems likely that the US will turn over control of its interests to some industrial/academic/commercial consortium at that time.


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3763 posts, RR: 29
Reply 2, posted (8 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4648 times:

Quoting Thorny (Reply 1):
ur international partners have not signed on to that plan, so ISS could well continue operations at ISS beyond that date without the US. It seems likely that the US will turn over control of its interests to some industrial/academic/commercial consortium at that time.

Thank you... 2016 sounds somewhat early, but aren't the Europeans generally supposed to do most of the ordinary "support" flights once the ISS is complete by using the ATV?

I have no clue of the actual calculations, but running the station, even accepting the fact that this will be expensive, must be much cheaper than developing and building it, so wouldn't a longer use make economical sense?


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4633 times:

Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 2):
Thank you... 2016 sounds somewhat early, but aren't the Europeans generally supposed to do most of the ordinary "support" flights once the ISS is complete by using the ATV?

That's still under discussion, and Europe has not yet given the go-ahead to produce more ATVs. Note that NASA has set aside $500 million for unmanned cargo delivery, and the idea is for that to be a commercial service provided by someone else not NASA (the cargo-only version of CEV has been cancelled.) That logically could continue after 2016 with someone else (the industrial/academic/commercial consortium) paying the bills. At present, it looks like US companies Boeing and Lockheed-Martin are both studying license produced cargo vehicles launched on US rockets... Boeing with Europe's ATV on Delta IV and Lockheed with Japan's HTV on Atlas 5, but both could be beaten to the punch by one of the small startup companies such as t/Space with a proprietary vehicle.

The Station components were designed for a 15-year service life. That doesn't mean the Station will start to fall apart after 15 years, but it does mean maintenance and repairs will start to require more time and money after that point. That's where the 2016 retirement date comes from. Of course, with a lot of the US/European/Japanese equipment still sitting on the ground awaiting launch, the "shelf life" is questionable. But for the core components (Russia's Zarya and Zvezda, US's Node 1, Z1, and Destiny) the clock is ticking.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic How Long Will The ISS Be Used?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Military aviation related posts only!
  • Not military related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
How Long Would The US Have Been Giving Away F4U's posted Sun Oct 8 2006 08:47:57 by L-188
How Long Will Space Remain Peaceful? posted Thu Feb 9 2006 14:48:32 by AerospaceFan
What Will The F-35s Be Called? posted Thu Apr 8 2004 12:05:23 by Greaser
When Will The PC-12s Be Delivered To U.S.A.F.? posted Thu Jan 26 2006 17:55:10 by CX747
When Will The Last F-4 Phantom II Be Retired? posted Tue Sep 20 2005 23:36:34 by TheSonntag
How Capable Is The North Korean Military? posted Mon Oct 9 2006 11:01:50 by CHRISBA777ER
Will The P-8 Have 767400er Type Wing Tips Or Not? posted Fri Sep 8 2006 01:05:18 by 747400sp
How Far Away Could Saturn V Be Heard? posted Wed Mar 29 2006 06:30:32 by KDTWFlyer
Will The Israeli Air Force Acquire The F-18E? posted Wed Mar 15 2006 16:23:08 by Columba
Will The Air Force Buy More Than 180 C-17s? posted Fri Feb 10 2006 20:29:07 by CX747

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format