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Japanese Pilots  
User currently onlineRyan h From Australia, joined Aug 2001, 1495 posts, RR: 1
Posted (7 years 5 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 4692 times:

I have heard many stories that the Japanese pilots during the Second World War did not have parachutes. I find this a bit hard to believe.


South Australian Spotter
6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineWing From Turkey, joined Oct 2000, 1554 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (7 years 5 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 4685 times:

I don't think its hard to believe for a pilot whose goal was to crash into an aircraft carrier would need having a parachute.

Ottomans in history were burning the ships they sailed when they arrive to the battle field,there was no other chooice other than victory or die,Japanese are also a fighter nation.I would believe if they leave their parachutes just to fight harder,as a motivation of no turning back except from victory.



Widen your world
User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (7 years 5 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4661 times:

Consider the Japanese warrior mindset and you will find it a lot easier to believe.

For the Japanese soldier (certainly the professional, not talking about the later draftees) surrender or flight from battle was a disgrace not just to you but to your family, your unit, and the emperor.
Death in combat was a worthy fate, victory of course even better.

So many of them would likely refuse parachutes going into battle even if offered.
AFAIK parachutes were available, especially during training and ferry missions.



I wish I were flying
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 3, posted (7 years 5 months 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 4632 times:

Quoting Wing (Reply 1):
a pilot whose goal was to crash into an aircraft carrier would need having a parachute.

But they did wear helmets.
Go figure!



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 19
Reply 4, posted (7 years 5 months 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 4507 times:

leather caps rather, reinforced with leather straps.
Those were their radio headsets.



I wish I were flying
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12061 posts, RR: 52
Reply 5, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4257 times:

Quoting Wing (Reply 1):
I don't think its hard to believe for a pilot whose goal was to crash into an aircraft carrier would need having a parachute.

The kamakasi attacks didn't start, in mass, until late 1944. Prior to that, the goal of the IJN and IJAF was to keep as many experienced pilots as possible.

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 3):
But they did wear helmets.
Go figure!



Quoting Jwenting (Reply 4):
leather caps rather, reinforced with leather straps.
Those were their radio headsets.

That was true with the pilots of all the WWII combatents. It was the technoligy of the day.


User currently offlinePtrjong From Netherlands, joined Mar 2005, 3884 posts, RR: 19
Reply 6, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4253 times:



Blue Box Toys is proud to introduce "Lieutenant Sakae," a 1:6 scale, fully poseable WWII Imperial Japanese Navy Pilot. This super-realistic 12-inch action figure features a painstaking attention to detail, intricate design and die-cast metal weapons and accessories. "Lieutenant Sakae" comes equipped with authentic Japanese pilot flight suit, fur lined flight cap with goggles, scarf, headband, Nambu pistol with holster, Life vest, Parachute harness with 4 point buckle, binoculars with case, wristwatch, compass, metal samurai "pilots" short sword with scabbard and more.

Japanese pilots may have been quite prepared to die in battle, but I don't think they were so keen to die as a result of a stupid engine failure. And certainly their commanding officers were not keen to lose them.

Also, in WWII aircraft you'd usually need a pillow to sit on if you weren't wearing a parachute, right?

Peter



The only difference between me and a madman is that I am not mad (Salvador Dali)
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