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Last Roar For The RAF Jaguars  
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13241 posts, RR: 77
Posted (7 years 7 months 3 days ago) and read 10164 times:

No.6 Sqn RAF, now does not provide deploy-able Jaguar aircraft, marking the operational end of front line service after 33 years.
This forum has the news, as well as the odd video;
http://forum.keypublishing.co.uk/showthread.php?p=1107376

An early Anglo-French project, intended to be a supersonic advanced trainer with a secondary light attack capability, the design grew to the extent that the training role was replaced by a much more potent strike aircraft.

On entering RAF service, it largely replaced F-4M Phantoms, needed for the air defence role, some saw the Jag as somewhat puny compared to the F-4.
But, designed as a low level attack type, it's strengths became clear, a small target, great low level performance, robust, easy to deploy, economic in operation for a military jet.
Early on, it did suffer from a lack of power, the RAF would upgrade the engines to the export standard, then add weapon options such as LGB's, AIM-9's, ECM pods.
In the 1980's, the Jaguar units in RAF Germany, Nos.2, 14, 17, 20 and 31 Sqns, replaced the Jags with the Tornado IDS, leaving the three rapid deployment units, 6, 41 and 54 Sqns, to serve long after many had expected.

The French AF (who retired the type in 2005), never upgraded the engine, they had a more austere avionic fit, but in time, they'd add ECM pods, LGB's, Magic AAM's, the AS.30 Laser missile.
For a time, one French unit operated a basic SEAD role with a Martel ASM carried under fuselage.


Both AF's used Jag's to great effect in the 1991 Gulf War, the RAF machines got more upgrades prior to deployment, tweaked engines, the long requested overwing pylons for AIM-9's-as on export ones, freeing up the regular pylons, secure radios, improved IFF, more chaff/flare dispensers, added US cluster munitions-unlike the RAF's BL755-suitable for medium level, the CVR-7 rockets, plus a previously classified addition of radar absorbent material strips added to wing, tail and fin leading edges.
Both services had no losses in combat on the type in 1991.
Jaguar also served in the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, the withdrawal of Turkish basing, prevented the RAF Jaguar from taking part in the 2003 Iraq war however.

In the 1990's, the RAF did a rolling series of upgrades, greatly expanding weapon and sensor options within the limitations of a small 1960's era cockpit, such as single crew TIALD pods, as well as further engine improvements, all done on budget and schedule.
But, the advent of Typhoon in the swing role-which the RAF is moving rapidly towards (a potential Afghan deployment next year), means the end of the Jaguar, the last Sqn, No.6, will stand up on Typhoons once the former Tornado F.3 11 Sqn, completes it's conversion to Typhoon.

Jaguar was exported to Oman, Ecuador, Nigeria and India, who have produced in under licence-with unique versions like the Agave radar Maritime Jaguar, with BAe Sea Eagle ASMs.

The Adour engine developed for the Jaguar-another Anglo-French effort, would in it's unreheated version, provide the perfect powerplant for the Hawk trainer, without which, the smaller, older, venerable R/R Viper might well have been used, meaning a more limited aircraft, not the great success that the Hawk is even today.

http://www.raf.mod.uk/equipment/jaguar.cfm

http://www.raf.mod.uk/gallery/jaguargallery.cfm

http://www.aircraftinaction.co.uk/jaguartribute.htm

http://www.sepecat.info/b

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29813 posts, RR: 58
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 10054 times:

I got to see two of them at Elemendorf about 5 years ago. A couple weeks later one of them when down up by Eagle, Alaska.

Pilot was killed.

But when the aircraft was on static display at Elemendorf, I have to say that the nosewheel on one of the aircraft was down to the bare threads. Other then on Russian aircraft, I usually don't see that. I suspect it was because it was such a wide low-pressure tire.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineAeroWeanie From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1610 posts, RR: 52
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 10039 times:
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Quoting GDB (Thread starter):
Jaguar was exported to Oman, Ecuador, Nigeria and India, who have produced in under licence-with unique versions like the Agave radar Maritime Jaguar, with BAe Sea Eagle ASMs.

Despite the Jaguar leaving RAF and French service, India is still taking delivery of new production Jaguars from HAL!


User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13241 posts, RR: 77
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 9933 times:

Interesting about the tyres L-188, the Jag did have a sturdy gear, in the late 1970's, a RAF example demonstrated operations from a motorway in the UK, closed off for this demonstration.

India selected the Jaguar in 1978, for it's Deep Penetration Strike Aircraft requirement.
Competition came from the SAAB AJ-37 Viggen-ruled out since the JT-8D powerplant version modified by Volvo, could be subject to a US embargo.
Then Dassault tried to replace the Jaguar deal with the Mirage F.1, the French arm of SEPECAT had not been a part of Dassault when the project began, but was by this time, but India stuck with the Jag.

Dassault did manage to replace the Naval Jaguar M with the all French Super Etendard. Carrier trials did take place with a prototype Jaguar M, but it's lack of thrust for a bolt er in carrier ops was cited as unacceptable. (Though the engine did, as shown later, have plenty of development potential).
Maybe just as well, a developed Jaguar M with uprated engines, the Agave radar later installed by India, would have been a rather more potent strike aircraft in Argentine hands in 1982.

Another lost customer was Iraq, the UK government turning down an Iraqi request in 1977 for Jags.
Kuwait looked to order, but delays in approving financing led to late production A-4's being selected instead.

In truth, not being a multi role type made Jaguar less attractive for many smaller air forces.

But it's long, distinguished service with both France and the UK was a testament to it's soundness, 33 years in RAF service-not bad for what was often seen as an interim type.


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Photo © Geoff Hibbert - UK Airshow Review



[Edited 2007-05-02 18:47:07]

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[Edited 2007-05-02 18:51:22]

User currently offlineBarfBag From India, joined Mar 2001, 2248 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 9876 times:

The IAF Jaguars have been overhauled by HAL and are equipped with DARIN II avionics suite now. They'll see service till 2015 or beyond. Here are the IAF Jaguar specs: Jaguar in IAF.

Here's a fascinating account of a problem with the Jaguar's hydraulics that temporarily grounded the IAF fleet in the 1990s. The BAe analysts proved unequal to the task of determining the cause of the problem, and IAF/HAL then root caused it. The solution was extended to the entire Jaguar fleet later, including RAF and FrAF:
A tale of two hydraulic systems



India, cricket junior and senior world champions
User currently offlineTIMC From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 133 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 8784 times:

Sorry to drag up an old thread, but I'm fairly curious on this one. I've read many conspiracy stories claiming that the Jaguar was the most cost effective jet in the RAF's inventory and provided capabilities that no other RAF type could match. The example they give here was a BNC (Biologial, Nuclear and Chemical) resistant cockpit, making it ideal for support in potential terrorist attacks. Does anyone else have anything to say on whether it should have been retired or not?

Second question is, what happens to the Jaguars now? Presumably, there is a hangar at Conningsby with a load of Jaguars sat in it doing nothing... are they all going to be destroyed, sold to privateers or given to museums? I'm curious as to what happens to a fighter jet at the end of its life, can it really be as simple as just scrapping it?

Then thirdly, if the last major ops that Jaguar took part was the first Gulf War, what has it been doing for the past 17 years?! I do seem to recall there were some jags in 1999 over Kosovo, is that correct? Again though, between then and now, what was the Jaguar fleet doing?


User currently offlineGPHOTO From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 831 posts, RR: 24
Reply 6, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 8671 times:
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Quoting TIMC (Reply 5):
've read many conspiracy stories claiming that the Jaguar was the most cost effective jet in the RAF's inventory and provided capabilities that no other RAF type could match.

Can't help you with these, though I have heard many of the same stories. There have been cutbacks in the UK armed forces, certainly, so maybe a need to rationalise on the number of types? I really don't know.

Quoting TIMC (Reply 5):
Second question is, what happens to the Jaguars now? Presumably, there is a hangar at Conningsby with a load of Jaguars sat in it doing nothing... are they all going to be destroyed, sold to privateers or given to museums? I'm curious as to what happens to a fighter jet at the end of its life, can it really be as simple as just scrapping it?

They are mostly at RAF Cosford. The 6 Sqn jets flew there last year. As a major training base (for a little while longer anyway), many airframes are used as teaching aids for groundcrew. Here they carry on serving the taxpayer in a useful role. Currently Cosford is awash with Jaguars. At the recent airshow, you would have seen quite a few. Some were 'offically' on static display outside, more were in use in the hangars demonstrating how staff are trained, which can be quite interesting, but almost impossible for the photographers. Sadly, most were hidden 'out the back', but still just about viewable by the enthusiast prepared to walk a bit further. The 'Desert Pink' and 'Spotty Jag' had pride of place in the static however.


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The RAF Cosford event is billed more of a family day-out than an enthusiasts paradise, but it would be nice if several more of these airframes could be pulled out for us to photograph, as has been done on occasion in the past. Even if this was well away from where most of the public would go - we don't want them getting in the shots anyway.  Smile


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Photo © Jim Groom



Best regards,

Jim



Erm, is this thing on?
User currently offlineBlackProjects From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2007, 756 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 8514 times:

A lot of the Jaguars are no longer at Cosford but have moved to Suffolk by road to the old RAF Bentwaters and into Civil hands.

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