Sponsor Message:
Military Aviation & Space Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Is There Video Of Nasa 747 W/ Shuttle Taking Off?  
User currently offlineXbraniffone From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 80 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 5144 times:

Is there any footage anywhere of the NASA 747 taking off with the shuttle?

I've seen the stills on Airlines.net of the shuttle being placed on the 747. What an awesome sight. I'd love to see it in person.

Thanks


DC3 8 9 10, 1011, BAC111, 707 720 727 737 747 757 767 777 A319 320 330 340
30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20640 posts, RR: 62
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 5138 times:

Plenty. Search for "747" and "Shuttle" on YouTube. Here's the first one which popped up:




International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8453 posts, RR: 10
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 5129 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

YouTube has everything  Smile








After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineAV8AJET From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1348 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 4968 times:

Cool video's. I have a few questions?

1. Where are these airplanes when they are not being used?
2. Are there two of them?
3. What will happen to them when the Shuttle is decommissioned, will they also be decommissioned or stay on for the furture replacement?
4. Are they special NASA pilots that fly these or do they have part time pilots that fly them?
5. Could a 777 fill this role?

Just curious thanks!



"To fly or not to fly there is no question!"
User currently offlineGreg3322 From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 205 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days ago) and read 4877 times:

Quoting AV8AJET (Reply 3):
1. Where are these airplanes when they are not being used?
2. Are there two of them?
3. What will happen to them when the Shuttle is decommissioned, will they also be decommissioned or stay on for the furture replacement?
4. Are they special NASA pilots that fly these or do they have part time pilots that fly them?
5. Could a 777 fill this role?

There are two of them. After the Columbia accident, they were put in storage in Arizona along with a bunch of other airliners. I imagine the same will happen when the Shuttle's are retired. I can't answer the other questions.

I know they usually have one of the ships on display and open to walk inside during the Edwards AFB open houses. Nothing special inside, just a couple of rows of F-class seats in the front and nothing else behind them. I always assumed there would be some internal supports, but there is not, at least as far as I could tell. I would guess there are some more stringers, but I have nothing to compare it to.

Greg


User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21532 posts, RR: 59
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days ago) and read 4851 times:

Does the Space Shuttle "lift itself" during flight? Seems like it has a decent angle of attack, which it needs to glide, so how much weight does it add during flight?


Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineOldeuropean From Germany, joined May 2005, 2091 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 months 6 days ago) and read 4812 times:

Here is a video of the Russian counterpart:



(the music is annoying)  Big grin

Axel



Wer nichts weiss muss alles glauben
User currently offlineJimpop From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 4693 times:

Quoting Oldeuropean (Reply 6):
Here is a video of the Russian counterpart:

What is the "Russian counterpart" doing these days? Why isn't it used to/from the ISS instead of the Soyuz?


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 4682 times:

Quoting Jimpop (Reply 7):
What is the "Russian counterpart" doing these days? Why isn't it used to/from the ISS instead of the Soyuz?

It was a "me too" response by the Soviet Union, where leadership insisted they have their own Shuttle because the U.S. does and they were convinced the U.S. Shuttle was a military weapon system. By the time they realized their mistake (in the era of Glasnost) it was too late to turn back, so they went ahead with first flight. The first flight outwardly looked like a great success. but Buran suffered structural damage due to inadequate heat protection during re-entry, and the design for Buran 2 had to be modified. In the middle of that, the Soviet Union collapsed and fell into economic chaos. The Buran project was one of the first casualties. The Mir 2 project followed soon thereafter, but was later revived as the Russian half of the International Space Station. Buran 2 was destroyed when a snow-laden roof collapsed on it a few years ago.


User currently offlineRwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2353 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 4552 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting AV8AJET (Reply 3):
3. What will happen to them when the Shuttle is decommissioned, will they also be decommissioned or stay on for the furture replacement?

Well, the SCAs are a pair of old (and moderately well used) 747-100s, and they're not going to be worth much when the shuttle retires (Orion won't need anything like the SCAs), so I'd expect they'll go to the desert to rot, or a museum. The need to undo all the NASA mods would probably make these uninteresting to any freight company.

Quoting AV8AJET (Reply 3):
5. Could a 777 fill this role?

The orbiter is not that heavy (about 151,000lbs empty), any 777 (other than a -200) could easily lift the weight. Aerodynamic issues should be reasonable to deal with as well. But there's no real point. The shuttle will supposedly retire in 2010*, and there are no more than 15** remaining flights (not counting the current STS-117).


*I think it's unlikely that NASA will manage their current schedule, and the last flight will be in 2011, unless there's another accident, which would likely terminate the program immediately.

**Only 13 are "definitely" scheduled, plus two contingency missions, plus there are rescue missions now penciled in for all remaining flights.


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 4550 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Rwessel (Reply 9):
*I think it's unlikely that NASA will manage their current schedule, and the last flight will be in 2011, unless there's another accident, which would likely terminate the program immediately.

There's no shuttle funding past FY10.



Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineRwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2353 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 4540 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 10):
There's no shuttle funding past FY10.

Of course. But if they don't get the last few of bits of ISS launched by the end of 2010, do you think they're just going to tell the Japanese, Russians and/or Italians, "Too bad, maybe we'll bother launching your components on the next space station?"

The 2010 cutoff for Shuttle flights is pretty arbitrary, and appears to be the usual "what's the earliest we can't prove we won't be done by" planning date. If the schedule slips, I'd bet the program will be extended.


User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 months 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 4471 times:

How many fueling stops did they have to do on the typical cross-country trek? I can't imagine this configuration was particularly good for the economy of a standard 747-100, so there'd have to be at least two stops, if not 3. Were special facilities required? Or did they just land at the nearest convenient AFB that could provide proper security?


There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineRwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2353 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 4456 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Lemurs (Reply 12):
How many fueling stops did they have to do on the typical cross-country trek? I can't imagine this configuration was particularly good for the economy of a standard 747-100, so there'd have to be at least two stops, if not 3. Were special facilities required? Or did they just land at the nearest convenient AFB that could provide proper security?

It varies, but two stops is typical, three on occasion. The route varies a bit too, especially due to weather. After STS-114, Discovery flew back from Dryden/Edwards to KSC with stops at Altus AFB (Oklahoma), and Barksdale AFB (Louisiana). Typically one of the stops is overnight.

There are not really any special support requirements for the SCA at intermediate stops, just a good supply of Jet-A, adequate runway and security. They could technically use almost any airport that can handle a 747, but I'm pretty sure that the SCAs are not certified, and using a civil airport would probably involve some hassles.

At ether end you need a "Mate/Demate Device" to mount/unmount the orbiter. Range with the orbiter mounted is about 1000nm.

And a very interesting shot of the orbiter mounting hardware on the SCA:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Shuttle_mounting_point.JPG


User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (7 years 3 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 4455 times:

Quoting Rwessel (Reply 13):
And a very interesting shot of the orbiter mounting hardware on the SCA:

 rotfl  That's fantastic. Glad to see there are pockets of humor buried in the bureaucracy of NASA.



There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 3 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4428 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Rwessel (Reply 11):
I'd bet the program will be extended.

I'll take that bet. NASA is already scrambling for CEV dollars and any funds used to extend shuttle would just about have to come from CEV - science is about tapped out....



Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineRHAnthony From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 41 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 3 months 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4364 times:

Since touch down is at Edwards in about 3 hours, I'm guessing someone will have some new 747/Shuttle video soon!
I seriously hope some of the photographers from this site are going to be out there for landing and such... I'm trying to get the kids interested enough to head out there now  Wink


User currently offlineFlynavy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 3 months 6 hours ago) and read 4320 times:

The SCA can land at civilian airports, no doubt creating more logistics issues over a military airfield, but for instance MCO is a alternate landing site.

User currently offlineWolverine From Germany, joined Aug 2006, 411 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (7 years 3 months 5 hours ago) and read 4314 times:

One of the russian Shuttles was found in the middle east, some years ago.. It is the one with the air breathing engines. It's planned to take it to the Museum at Speyer, Germany. But there are some problems.. So, in a few years it shall be on display at the museum..


Face your fears, live your dreams! (No Fear)
User currently offlineA320ajm From United Kingdom, joined May 2006, 546 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 4276 times:

I have only saw pictures of this happening - the video is great! I have some questions - What would happen if the shuttle came off the 747 in flight?Do you think it would glide for a while? And would the 747 survive?
Regards
A320ajm



If the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 4273 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting A320ajm (Reply 19):
I have some questions - What would happen if the shuttle came off the 747 in flight?Do you think it would glide for a while? And would the 747 survive?

yes, yes, and yes




Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineRHAnthony From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 41 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 4211 times:

So my question for you shuttle know-it-alls is... on the ferry runs, do they have a pilot in the shuttle incase they need to seperate? Or if there is some inflight issue, does the shuttle become a loss (assuming the 747 can not recover)?

I realize it would be a pain to sit in the shuttle for a few hours just for the ride, and they would need a shuttle pilot to do it, but I'm just wondering... since there is no automated landing hardware on shuttle... what if?


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3523 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 4208 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting RHAnthony (Reply 21):
on the ferry runs, do they have a pilot in the shuttle incase they need to seperate?

No. Under what circumstances do you think they would need a pilot in the shuttle?

Quoting RHAnthony (Reply 21):
Or if there is some inflight issue, does the shuttle become a loss (assuming the 747 can not recover)?

If there is some unrecoverable circumstance the SCA has an emergency escape system. IIRC the system blows out some windows (to vent the cabin) and then a hole in the bottom skin of the aircraft. Crew exits by sliding down a chute and then out the bottom. SCA and payload would be a total loss.



Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineRwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2353 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 4201 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting RHAnthony (Reply 21):
So my question for you shuttle know-it-alls is... on the ferry runs, do they have a pilot in the shuttle incase they need to seperate? Or if there is some inflight issue, does the shuttle become a loss (assuming the 747 can not recover)?

To the best of my knowledge, the explosive bolts that were used to release Enterprise during the drop tests haven't been fitted since about 1977... Further, the drop tests had a crew (as you pointed out), *and* were fueled and had the APUs running (so there would be electrical and hydraulic power) before the drop. On the ferry flights, there's no hydrazine on board for the APUs, and the shuttle is completely inert. Even worse, there are mechanical locks installed on the control surfaces, so they don't flap around (so even if you had hydraulic pressure, you still couldn't move the surfaces).

In other words, there's no way to release the orbiter in an emergency on a ferry flight.


User currently offlineRHAnthony From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 41 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 4110 times:

Okay, thats what I was figuring. Would introduce much more opportunity for an incident having to fly it in "ready to glide" status... but I was just wondering if, in the event of a 747 engine failure or something... the whole pair would be ditched.

I guess in the big picture, that wouldn't be as bad as other shuttle incidents we've had, but still... that would suck.


25 Post contains links ZANL188 : "Atlantis was originally set to leave on Friday, but issues with the retraction of Atlantis' landing gear hydraulics and a damaged left hand 'salad bo
26 Post contains images RHAnthony : Just renewed my L2 over there... if anyone here is a space geek and NOT on Nasaspaceflight.com, it is to Shuttle, and Orion (and all manned flights),
27 KC135TopBoom : I thought there was a plan to send one to the Smithstonian and mount Enterprize on it. Is that noth going to happen now? The 3 remaining JT-9Ds will
28 Thorny : Maybe at Edwards. The wing of Udvar-Hazy that currently houses Enterprise isn't large enough for a 747.
29 Rwessel : I hadn't heard that, but I think that would be an absolute sin. Enterprise is sitting on the floor right now where you can almost walk up to it and t
30 Rwessel : And yesterday the SCA carrying Atlantis stopped at Amarillo International (AMA) for fuel.
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Is There Video Of Nasa 747 W/ Shuttle Taking Off?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Military aviation related posts only!
  • Not military related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Any Good Video Of Shuttle Landing? posted Tue Aug 23 2005 00:08:34 by Phxplanes
Video Of Near Plane Crash At Airshow posted Tue May 22 2007 04:32:57 by KPDX
Video Of C-17 Compressor Stall posted Fri Feb 2 2007 22:31:06 by KevinSmith
Video Of C-130 Flying Through Thunderstorm posted Fri Jan 26 2007 11:00:15 by AerospaceFan
Video Of Crewchiefs posted Sat Dec 9 2006 15:22:58 by LongbowPilot
Photos And Video Of First SA Gripen posted Thu Sep 21 2006 01:13:58 by DEVILFISH
Video Of A400M's TP400-D6 Engine posted Thu Jul 27 2006 20:20:04 by RAPCON
"Orion" Said To Be Name Of NASA's CEV Program posted Fri Jul 21 2006 10:42:36 by AerospaceFan
Nasa Space Shuttle Takeoff Flightpath... posted Tue Jul 4 2006 20:17:35 by Deltadude8
Video Of Ares I And V On Moon Mission.... posted Sun Jul 2 2006 21:52:36 by Boeing Nut

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format