Sponsor Message:
Military Aviation & Space Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Official STS-122 Mission Thread  
User currently offlineJetBlueGuy2006 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1660 posts, RR: 1
Posted (6 years 10 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 6844 times:

STS-120 and Discovery landed safely this afternoon, so here are some of the vitals on STS-122

Crew

Stephen Frick - Commander
Alan G. Poindexter - Pilot
Stanley G. Love - Mission specialist
Rex J. Walheim - Mission specialist
Leland D. Melvin - Mission specialist
Hans Schlegel - Mission specialist

Primary Mission:

to deliver the European built Columbus module to the station, and to return Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Daniel Tani to Earth. After Atlantis lands, the orbiter will be prepared for STS-125, the final servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope. STS-122 will mark the final scheduled visit by Atlantis to the International Space Station. The completion of the mission will leave ten flights remaining in the Space Shuttle program until its end in 2010, excluding two as-yet-unconfirmed Contingency Logistic Flights.

Orbiter: Atlantis
Launch Date: Dec. 6, 2007
Landing Date: Dec. 17, 2007


Home Airport: Capital Region International Airport (KLAN)
126 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 10 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 6791 times:

Addendum...

Launch time on Thursday, December 6 will be at about 4:30 pm EST. Liftoff might be delayed a few days, depending on whether or not the Space Station crew can make up time lost due to the solar wing repair during STS-120. The December launch window closes on December 13. The next window opens January 4.

Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39A on Saturday morning.

STS-122 is Space Station Assembly Mission 1E, the first European primary payload.

STS-122 will be the 121st flight of the Shuttle. (STS-119 is scheduled for Fall 2008) and the 29th flight of the Atlantis.

STS-122 will also launch with ESA astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who will replace Daniel Tani aboard the International Space Station. Tani gets a very short stay on ISS due to the Shuttle launch delays stemming from the hail damage last February.

Frick previously piloted STS-110, which also was Walheim's first flight. Eyharts of France flew to Mir on Soyuz TM-27 in 1998. Schlegel of Germany flew on STS-55 (Spacelab D2) way back in 1993. Poindexter, Love and Melvin are rookies.

Columbus will be the eighth pressurized module added to the Space Station, after Zarya, Node 1 "Unity", Zvezda, U.S. Lab "Destiny", Airlock "Quest", Airlock "Pirs", and Node 2 "Harmony".

Columbus is the same size and built by the same company as the Multipurpose Logistics Modules (Leonardo, Rafaello, and Donatello) used to carry supplies and equipment to and from the Station aboard the Shuttle. But unlike the MPLMs, Columbus is equipped for permanent operation at the Station, with micrometeroid shielding and long-duration control systems. Columbus also has four external mounting points for experiments. Two of these, the Solar Monitoring Observatory and European Technology Exposure Facility, are flying on STS-122.

Columbus can accomodate ten active International Standard Payload Racks, refrigerator-size units for laboratory experiments, storage, and control systems which are plugged into standard interfaces in the hull of the western Space Station modules. In return for launching Columbus on the Shuttle and providing utilities on the Station, five of Columbus's ISPRs are allocated to NASA. Columbus will launch with five ISPRs, four laboratory racks for the European Space Agency and 1 storage rack. The four laboratory ISPRs are the Biolab, Fluid Science Laboratory, European Drawer Rack, and European Physiology Module. The other ISPRs will be delivered on flights next year.

Atlantis is not equipped with the Station-to-Shuttle Power Transfer System, so this will be a relatively short mission to ISS compared to STS-118 and STS-120.


User currently offlineDa man From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 887 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 6743 times:

Quoting Thorny (Reply 1):
But unlike the MPLMs, Columbus is equipped for permanent operation at the Station, with micrometeroid shielding and long-duration control systems.

What are the rumblings about possibly leaving an MPLM at the station permanently? I would think that Donatello, the more capable one that will only fly once would be the choice. I have heard and read this in several places but have not seen any official confirmation that this is being considered.



War Eagle!
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 6734 times:

Quoting Da man (Reply 2):
What are the rumblings about possibly leaving an MPLM at the station permanently? I would think that Donatello, the more capable one that will only fly once would be the choice. I have heard and read this in several places but have not seen any official confirmation that this is being considered.

It has been widely reported that the last two logisics missions, STS-131 and STS-133 have been given a go-ahead as has Atlantis's non-retirement after STS-125. We're still waiting for official word from NASA. It might be a matter of waiting on the current do-nothing U.S. Congress to finally approve the Fiscal Year 2008 budget first.

The "permanent" MPLM concept is probably also waiting on this to happen. Donatello is indeed the front-runner. This will happen on STS-130 if it is approved by NASA and the ISS partners.


User currently offlineDa man From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 887 posts, RR: 12
Reply 4, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 6726 times:

Quoting Thorny (Reply 3):
The "permanent" MPLM concept is probably also waiting on this to happen. Donatello is indeed the front-runner. This will happen on STS-130 if it is approved by NASA and the ISS partners.

Hmm, I wonder which berthing port would be Donatello's permanent place on the ISS?



War Eagle!
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 6711 times:

Quoting Da man (Reply 4):
Hmm, I wonder which berthing port would be Donatello's permanent place on the ISS?

Node 2 Zenith (upward), the port previously planned for the now-cancelled Centrifuge Accomodation Module.


User currently offlineDa man From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 887 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 6707 times:

Quoting Thorny (Reply 5):
Node 2 Zenith (upward), the port previously planned for the now-cancelled Centrifuge Accomodation Module.

That's what I was thinking too. BTW, welcome to my respected members list.



War Eagle!
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 6636 times:

Atlantis rolled-out of the Vehicle Assembly Building at 4:43am Saturday and is now at Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff remains on schedule for December 6, but if the Space Station is not ready, they will hold the start of the countdown a day or two until it is. The December launch windows runs through December 13 due to solar lighting (beta angle) conditions on the Station and Shuttle in their docked configuration.

User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 6551 times:

Updates...

At Launch Pad 39A, Columbus was installed in Atlantis's payload bay on Monday.

Also on Monday, the International Space Station crew of Whitson, Malenchenko, and Tani relocated PMA-2 from the forward port on the Destiny Laboratory Module to the forward port of Node 2 Harmony on Monday. Relocation of Node 2/PMA-2 to the forward port of Destiny is scheduled for Wednesday.

A spacesuit malfunction in a test chamber at JSC forced NASA to standdown spacewalks at the Space Station until further notice. This has the potential to be major trouble, as a spacewalk is required next week to finish reinstalling Node 2 in its permanent position. However, this could also prove to be an isolated malfunction with no repercussions. NASA is still investigating Friday's spacesuit glitch, in which a trainee smelled smoke inside the spacesuit. No one was injured.

The schedule is still very tight for the Space Station crew to complete all the tasks needed before Atlantis arrives with Columbus.