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Official STS-123 Mission Thread  
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4962 times:

Atlantis is still in orbit, but Endeavour arrived at Launch Pad 39A this morning and we are just over three weeks from launch, so it is time for the STS-123 thread.

Flight: STS-123 (122nd flight of the Space Shuttle)

Orbiter: OV-105 Endeavour (21st flight of the Endeavour)

Mission: International Space Station Assembly Mission 1 J/A (25th Space Station U.S. assembly flight)

Crew:
Dominic Gorie, Commander (STS-91, STS-99, STS-108)
Gregory Johnson, Pilot (first flight)
Richard Linnehan, Mission Specialist (STS-78, STS-90, STS-109)
Robert Behnhen, Mission Specialist (first flight)
Michael Foreman, Mission Specialist (first flight)
Takao Doi, Mission Specialist, JAXA (STS-87)
Garrett Reisman, ISS Expedition 16 (launch)
Leopold Eyharts, ISS Expedition 16, ESA (return)

Payload:
Kibo External Logistics Module, Pressurized Section (ELM-PS)
Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (DEXTRE)
Remote Manipulator System
Orbiter Boom Sensor System (launch only)

Launch:
2:31am Eastern Daylight Time (6:31am UT)
Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Duration:
16 Days

STS-123 is highlighted by the first of three launches to add Japan's "Kibo" ("Hope") experiment laboratory to the International Space Station. The Kibo laboratory itself follows on STS-124 now planned for late April or early May. STS-123 will deliver the pressurized logisitics module (ELM-PS) carrying four System Racks, three science racks and 1 storage rack. The ELM-PS will be temporary berthed to Node 2 Zenith, and will be relocated to atop Kibo after its arrival this spring. Unlike the U.S. logistics modules, ELM-PS will be a permanent addition to the Space Station, serving as a storage room for Kibo. Kibo is the only module of the old Space Station Freedom design that was never reduced in size as a weight or cost-saving measure. It is the largest module on the Space Station and is too heavy to launch fully-outfitted. Eight of its internal racks are being launched first on the ELM-PS. They'll be relocated after Kibo's arrival. (The U.S. and European modules were forced to adopt a similar philosophy when Freedom became ISS in 1994 and the Station's orbit shifted to the much more difficult to reach 51.6 degree inclination.)

STS-123 also features the launch of Canada's next major contribution to the International Space Station, the DEXTRE robot hand. DEXTRE will allow much finer robotic arm activities than is possible with the CANADARM 2 robot arm alone. It is expected to greatly reduce the need for spacewalks in future Space Station operations.

Five spacewalks are planned for STS-123, three for the installation and outfitting of the ELM-PS and DEXTRE, and two to accomplish other Space Station tasks. Because of the Kibo laboratory's size, the Orbiter Boom Sensor System cannot be launched with Discovery on STS-124. Therefore Endeavour will leave its OBSS boom at the Space Station, where it will be available for tile damage surveys by Discovery. The boom will be returned with Discovery in May.

Endeavour is planned to remain in orbit for at least 16 days, again using the Station-to-Shuttle Power Transfer System to extend its stay.

88 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3632 posts, RR: 29
Reply 1, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4949 times:

I think it is interesting that the smaller part of Kibo is launched before the real Kibo module. I think it is very nice that Kibo is launched directly after Columbus, making the station really international.

Since all of the research modules have different experiments, it is maybe like comparing apples to oranges, but which module is the best, most advanced for research: The planned russian module, Destiny, Columbus or Kibo?


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4925 times:

Kibo is probably the most diverse of the laboratories. It has more internal accomodations and facilities for external experiments, including its own robot arm to manipulate them. Columbus is probably second, with Destiny (which is half control room) third and the Russian module, should it ever see the light of day, a distant fourth.

But Destiny is in the microgravity sweet spot, and has that big, beautiful window (WORF) for optical experiments.

The U.S. gets to use 50% of Columbus and 50% of Kibo in return for launching them and providing them with power, data connections, coolant, etc., so the U.S. really has the best of all worlds.


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3632 posts, RR: 29
Reply 3, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4915 times:

Will the russians be able to use Kibo and Columbus, as well? What do they get out of the ISS, since they are providing quite a lot in terms of support, living and transportation?

User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 4902 times:



Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 3):
Will the russians be able to use Kibo and Columbus, as well?

No. They planned to provide their own research modules (two of them) but have cancelled them. Now they are planning a combination laboratory/storage module for launch in 2009 or 10. They have interesting plans for massive expansion of the Russian side, but they still don't seem to have the funds to actually build it.

Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 3):
What do they get out of the ISS, since they are providing quite a lot in terms of support, living and transportation?

The Russians aren't "providing" transportation. They sell it, both Europe and the U.S. pay cash for the priviledge. The living quarters, Zarya, is actually owned by the United States (which bought it through Boeing in 1995-96.) Russia basically provides only the Zvezda service module. The U.S. supplies the Russian side electrical power from the truss and will launch Russia's small Docking and Cargo Module (similar to Piers) on STS-131.

Russia has some experiment space in Zvezda, but like the U.S. space in Destiny, hasn't done much with it yet.


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3632 posts, RR: 29
Reply 5, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 4887 times:

Still, living and sleeping and other things which are not experiments mostly takes place in the Russian part, is this correct? When the station is expanded to 6 people, where will they sleep, in Node 3 or Zvezda, or both?

When you say that the Russians do not have access to, lets say, Columbus, will this mean that a Russian member of an ISS expedition will not enter it, or will he actually perform experiments for the Americans and Europeans when he is not occupied with maintenance? I mean, later when we get 6 people aboard tasks can be split better between the members, but at the moment I guess there is more capability in the labs than 3 people can serve, anyway, right?


User currently offlineJetBlueGuy2006 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1662 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 4881 times:

What I find a bit interesting is Eyharts will be based on ISS for a relatively short period of time. The fact that Tani was up there since Oct. and then just two short stints to finish out Expedition 16 in April, which includes one more Flight Engineer with Reisman going up in March. Is there a particular reason for the variations of the rotation of the 3 position besides Whitson and Malenchenko?


Home Airport: Capital Region International Airport (KLAN)
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4832 times:



Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 5):
Still, living and sleeping and other things which are not experiments mostly takes place in the Russian part, is this correct?

No. The living quarters module, Zarya, is owned by the United States, not Russia (although they still act as if it is their's). The U.S. bought it in 1995, long before launch. It is not correct to say that living and sleeping is done in the Russian part, because Zarya is American.

Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 5):
When you say that the Russians do not have access to, lets say, Columbus, will this mean that a Russian member of an ISS expedition will not enter it, or will he actually perform experiments for the Americans and Europeans when he is not occupied with maintenance?

The Russians can go anywhere they want on ISS and certainly will be in Columbus and Kibo often. But the Russians do not get experiment space in Destiny, Columbus, or Kibo.

Quoting JetBlueGuy2006 (Reply 6):
Is there a particular reason for the variations of the rotation of the 3 position besides Whitson and Malenchenko?

Launch delays.


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3632 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 4814 times:



Quoting Thorny (Reply 7):
The U.S. bought it in 1995, long before launch. It is not correct to say that living and sleeping is done in the Russian part, because Zarya is American.

True, but the module uses Russian technology, thats my point (smaller hatches, different coulours, different electrical system and so on).

If I understand you correct, there is a difference between who is actually planning experiments, and who is on board to conduct the experiments, so that a Russian ISS member might conduct a experiment in Columbus or Destiny, which was planned, paid for and is under the supervision of Europe/US?

Ok, maybe its time to get back on topic, I am just fascinated on the ISS, also from a legal point of view. I still do not think Nasa will drop it in 2016 already. I rather think we won't see anybody on the moon until maybe 2020-2025...


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 4783 times:



Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 8):
If I understand you correct, there is a difference between who is actually planning experiments, and who is on board to conduct the experiments, so that a Russian ISS member might conduct a experiment in Columbus or Destiny, which was planned, paid for and is under the supervision of Europe/US?

I think we're on the same page. But I think the Russians have a much smaller role in the science objectives. It is my impression that most of the science is being done by the third crewmember aboard ISS, what the U.S. calls the Science Officer, which has generally been an American or European so far. The commander or flight engineer (the positions rotate between US and Russia) undoubtedly help, but I don't think they have a big role in performing experiments.


User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21681 posts, RR: 55
Reply 10, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week ago) and read 4660 times:



Quoting Thorny (Thread starter):
Because of the Kibo laboratory's size, the Orbiter Boom Sensor System cannot be launched with Discovery on STS-124. Therefore Endeavour will leave its OBSS boom at the Space Station, where it will be available for tile damage surveys by Discovery. The boom will be returned with Discovery in May.

So I guess this means that Discovery will be launched without an OBSS, and they'll do the scanning post-docking or post-undocking instead of on FD2?

Where will the OBSS sit while it's on the station?

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4620 times:



Quoting Mir (Reply 10):
Where will the OBSS sit while it's on the station?

On the S1 Truss segment. STS-118's fourth EVA last August installed attach points for the OBSS boom.


User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1881 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 4597 times:

The living and sleeping is done in the Russian section. Living quarters are in Zvezda. Zarya is used mostly for storage.


Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3546 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 4582 times:
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Quoting Nomadd22 (Reply 12):
The living and sleeping is done in the Russian section.

The sleeping is also done in Destiny. Galley & toilet are in the Russian section, I believe. If I'm not mistaken a US galley is going up soon or went up recently.



Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1881 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (6 years 8 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 4574 times:

I know they're thinking about crew quarters in Node 3. Maybe Bigelow will lease them something a little better than a double rack to sleep in.


Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (6 years 8 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 4510 times:



Quoting Nomadd22 (Reply 12):
The living and sleeping is done in the Russian section. Living quarters are in Zvezda. Zarya is used mostly for storage.

D'oh! Thanks for the correction.

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 13):
If I'm not mistaken a US galley is going up soon or went up recently.

I think it is on STS-126 this fall. That's the big logisitics flight (heaviest logistics flight to date.)


User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3546 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (6 years 8 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 4500 times:
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Quoting Thorny (Reply 15):
I think it is on STS-126 this fall. That's the big logisitics flight (heaviest logistics flight to date.)

i tried to find the real deal on it and couldn't. I know it's needed before they start 6 crew ops though...



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User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (6 years 8 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 4491 times:



Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 16):
i tried to find the real deal on it and couldn't. I know it's needed before they start 6 crew ops though...

It's on STS-126.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/st...ce/experiments/EXPRESS-Rack-6.html

Most of the other hardware needed for six crew (sleep station, crew healthcare system, treadmill) goes up on STS-128.


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3632 posts, RR: 29
Reply 18, posted (6 years 8 months 19 hours ago) and read 4394 times:

I find it interesting that the ATV launch takes place only few days before the Shuttle launch. Will the ISS crew have taken out everything off the ATV before the Shuttle arrives?

User currently offlineChksix From Sweden, joined Sep 2005, 345 posts, RR: 4
Reply 19, posted (6 years 8 months 18 hours ago) and read 4392 times:

The ATV will stay in a safe orbit away from ISS until the shuttle has undocked. It will commence the approach tests after that.


The conveyor belt plane will fly
User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3632 posts, RR: 29
Reply 20, posted (6 years 8 months 5 hours ago) and read 4343 times:

Right now, btw, you can see a landing video of STS 122. I know that Shuttle comes in very steep, but to me it looks as if it came down below the glideslope, so that I thought it might land before the runway. Certainly that wasn't the case, as it landed right on the runway, but it looks pretty spectacular.

http://anon.nasa-global.edgesuite.ne...obal/ksc/ksc_022008_sts122_pov.asx


User currently offlineBrendows From Norway, joined Apr 2006, 1020 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (6 years 8 months 4 hours ago) and read 4329 times:



Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 20):
but to me it looks as if it came down below the glideslope, so that I thought it might land before the runway.

As far as I know, that's how every approach is flown.


User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1881 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (6 years 8 months ago) and read 4297 times:

I remember the White Sands landing when the pilot pitched the nose way up to kill speed, and about 50 NASA reps wet their trousers.
I'm not sure how much play between stall and max touchdown speed those bricks have.



Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (6 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 4266 times:



Quoting Nomadd22 (Reply 22):
I remember the White Sands landing when the pilot pitched the nose way up to kill speed, and about 50 NASA reps wet their trousers.

That was "the wheelie" after main gear touchdown on STS-3. Jack Lousma said he thought the nose was coming down too fast.

Quoting Nomadd22 (Reply 22):
I'm not sure how much play between stall and max touchdown speed those bricks have.

Depends on landing weight.


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3632 posts, RR: 29
Reply 24, posted (6 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 4238 times:

To get back on topic, Endeavour is Go for launch on March 11th...

Lets hope this will be as smooth as STS 122, but without sensor glitch  Wink

Michael


25 TheSonntag : Launch date has been set. It will be March 11th, 2.28 AM EDT. Does this mean we have a night launch?
26 Thorny : Yes. Night launch and night landing.
27 Mke717spotter : Around what time do you think the landing would be? Would it be sometime in the late evening or early in the morning?
28 Nomadd22 : It seems like they haven't made much progress with that starboard rotary joint. Do they have any plans to do anything with it this trip, or will furth
29 Thorny : 8:35pm EDT, Wednesday, March 26. I think they've determined that they can go on with the two Kibo flights (STS-123 and STS-124) with the SARJ the way
30 TheSonntag : Not really important for the STS mission, but the ATV is ready to launch tomorrow, Esa has stated. Lets hope it won't be a firework as the first ever
31 Thorny : Not tomorrow. Saturday night/Sunday morning, depending on where you live. 4:03am UTC on 9 March. Launch was delayed 24 hours.
32 Post contains images TheSonntag : European point of view strikes again In fact, I always have problems getting adopted to the Nasa timetable stating EDT, as well I just hope they will
33 DeltaGuy : Just found out I got bleacher seats to this launch. The Commander, Dom Gorie, is a former A-7 driver who flew with my dad (was in my parent's wedding
34 Thorny : Endeavour remains on schedule for launch tonight at 2:28am EDT. Loading the External Tank with Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen will begin at about 5
35 Thorny : External Tank loading is underway. The ECO (engine cutoff) sensors, which caused the big delays for STS-122, have passed their tests and are go for fl
36 Post contains images TheSonntag : Lets hope the launch happens in time. If it does, it will launch right when I have woke up again
37 PhatAlbert : Ah Thorny Your a good "Nasa Intelligent Guy" lol... You know too much, according to me.. im not that smart on this stuff... or anyone else can answer
38 Post contains images KPDX : T-minus 14 minutes! Go Endeavour!   Edit: Ugh long hold now. [Edited 2008-03-10 22:38:23]
39 Thorny : Air. It keeps positive pressure inside the cabin, so nothing floating around outside can get in.
40 StasisLAX : How will NASA know whether foam or ice hits the Endeavor's wings on a night launch? I know that NASA closely monitors falling foam and ice on shuttle
41 Post contains images Boeing4ever : Less than three minutes left in the built in hold. B4e-Forever New Frontiers
42 Post contains images Brendows : Nice to see that everything seems to go so smoothly so far Have a good journey Endeavour!
43 Post contains images Boeing4ever : Lift off! Alas, I wonder..."Endeavour, go at throttle up. No action on RCS messages required." Something up with the reaction control thrusters? B4e-F
44 Post contains images StasisLAX : Awesome launch and even better camera shots from the cam on the external tank. Endeavor now safely in orbit with no incident
45 Post contains images Mke717spotter : Awesome launch! Guess it was worth getting up and out of bed in the middle of the night after all heh .
46 Sinlock : Clean MECO. Left side RCS error message, primary flash evap cooler fail, good secondary B sys. Back to bed.[Edited 2008-03-10 23:55:19]
47 Glidepath73 : Hi! Nice to see her save in Orbit. Is there any video of the launch available? Regards, Patrick
48 AV8orWALK : I went outside my condo seconds after liftoff fully expecting to see the Shuttle like normal. I suppose the cloud cover was too thick in Orlando to al
49 Post contains links and images Mir : Not at all. I was at Titusville and it was absolutely packed. I parked at the US-1 end of the causeway and was standing well beyond the Indian River
50 Thorny : Well, that was one of the least photogenic Shuttle launches ever! They can't all be pretty, I guess! Like the ATV launch on Saturday, Endeavour vanish
51 TheSonntag : True, I stood up 30 minutes early to see it on Nasa TV, and it did not fail this time, but it was soo boring... Maybe, boring is a good thing for spac
52 Yellowstone : Believe it or not, I actually watched the launch live from Cambridge, Massachusetts. There's about a 90-100 second window from about 7 minutes after l
53 Airboeing : very nice pics Mir !! I love the first one...
54 Post contains images Thorny : Seconded! But the second photo looks like a tornado!
55 HaveBlue : I was there on US1 right by the Miracle City Mall on the river, and the launch was gorgeous... until it hit the clouds. It was my first night launch d
56 TheSonntag : To me, the 2nd looks like a hydrogen Bomb test. Very nice pictures, thank you for posting them!
57 Post contains links and images PhatAlbert : ok somebody update me what is the thing that is in front of ISS and behind the shuttle? Sorry but i found this picture from the air force link website
58 Da man : That is the ATV 'Jules Verne' in its parking orbit.
59 Airboeing : I like this pic ! Can you give the link where to find it please ?
60 Thorny : Endeavour has docked at the International Space Station. Docking was at 11:49pm EDT.
61 Post contains links and images PhatAlbert : Yea it was posted under the picture on my original comment unless it didnt work here it is.. http://www.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/080311-F-1
62 Post contains links PhatAlbert : ok well... since it wont let me edit... im sorry i forgot to add another link this link is for the schedule for Nasa tv http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia
63 Thorny : Update... Canada's "DEXTRE" dextrous manipulator, still loaded on its carrier (a Spacelab pallet) was lifted out of Endeavour's payload bay and mounte
64 Nomadd22 : The press really seems taken with the "Giant Robot" thing. I just wish NASA would add a basic photography course to their training. I still haven't se
65 Post contains links ZANL188 : Given that it was just assembled on last nights EVA (and there are 3 more EVAs this mission) a little patience maybe in order. In the meantime there
66 Nomadd22 : Thanks ZANL188. My rant was kind of an old one. I almost never see ISS photos that give the true scale of that beast. (I want patience, and I want it
67 Post contains images ZANL188 : If you included the entire Canadian robotic system (mobile base system, the space station arm, and Dextre) the "robot" is probably about the size of
68 ZANL188 : A few minutes ago I saw all 3 spacecraft - Jules Verne, Endeavour, and the ISS. It was severe clear here in the southeast US, and aside from the setti
69 Gigneil : If you never got a good answer... that will be in the MLM, which is a Russian module schedule for December 8. Its going to feature both work/rest are
70 Nomadd22 : The Russian MLM is the one that's pretty much a duplicate of Zarya, right? I remember something about using the Zarya backup as long as it was already
71 Gigneil : Correct. It is about a half meter larger, but was designed as a backup to Zarya yes. It will no doubt be outfitted with new systems, and it will also
72 Nomadd22 : I saw they looked at an mystery pockmark in the SARJ. I take it one of the possibilities they're considering is a debris or meteor hit on the joint. I
73 Post contains links Thorny : Update... Endeavour has departed the International Space Station. The DEXTRE robot arm and Japan's Kibo ELM-PS were successfully installed on the Stat
74 PJ295 : I would like to thank you for the heads up. I missed Jules Verne but did see the space station with the shuttle chasing behind...it was very cool. I
75 Post contains images Mir : First landing attempt has been waved off due to weather. Going to try for the second one, but it'll be a night landing so chances of seeing it are min
76 Post contains links and images BlackProjects : http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/rrg2.pl?encoder/nasatv.rm The KSC NASA TV link that is not as Heavily used as the main NASA.GOV option.
77 Sinlock : Endeavour is go for De-orbit burn at 7:33EST. Directv viewers remember the new channel is 283.
78 BlackProjects : 200,000 feet 15.30 minuites to gofrom the Landing site
79 Post contains images Scottieprecord : Fox News has a live feed for anyone wanting to watch.. just fyi. Might want to mute it though as the O'Reilly factor is still showing on the other hal
80 Thorny : Endeavour has safely landed at Kennedy Space Center. Particularly bright APU venting on this flight! NASA PAO says it is normal, but I don't recall ev
81 Scottieprecord : Nice landing. Never really thought about it, but the Shuttle has no nav. lights, only an orange-looking beacon. Hmm..
82 Bwohlgemuth : I've googled it, but found nada. What is that flashing yellow light by the tail? APU exhaust?
83 Post contains images CURLYHEADBOY : Indeed, never witnessed anything this bright coming from the APU exhaust in the many shuttle night landings I've watched. Well, the guys there don't
84 Brendows : Correct, as Thorny pointed out: It puzzled me too, hadn't seen that before. Welcome home Endeavour!
85 Post contains images StasisLAX :
86 TheSonntag : Shuttle Flights are starting to be considered routine again. I am not so sure this is good, but Nasa certainly remembers the lessons learned. Incredi
87 Post contains images DODCFR : I have been to four Shuttle landings, once in the fire truck chasing it down the runway, and I've never seen the APU flame like that. But then again a
88 Post contains images Mke717spotter : Since I had baseball practice during the landing I set my T.V. to record CNN during that time assuming they would show it but when I watched it they
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