Sponsor Message:
Military Aviation & Space Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
F111 Hits Pelican, Makes Emergency Landing  
User currently offlineCpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 6988 times:

http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,23562980-662,00.html

F111 hits a pelican and makes an emergency landing.

Scopical also reports on it:
http://www.scopical.com.au/articles/...mergency-landing-after-bird-strike
(but includes a photo of a F18..)

ABC report:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2...8/04/19/2221547.htm?section=justin

No images so far as I could find showing the damage.

Edit: Here is one with a view of the plane:

http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,23563691-2,00.html

The nose is severely damaged - but otherwise it looks like it could be repaired.

[Edited 2008-04-18 18:41:54]

[Edited 2008-04-18 18:43:20]

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 6951 times:

Kudos to the crew, that must have scared the stuffing out of them!!

User currently offlineFerrypilot From New Zealand, joined Sep 2006, 897 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 6949 times:

They must have seen it in the last couple of seconds to know it was a Pelican.

User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9104 posts, RR: 75
Reply 3, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6919 times:

Not the first time, happened before in the 1970s from memory down at Evans Head, last time it was fatal. I think the ejection module from that crashed aircraft is still at 3AD at Amberley.


We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineCpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 4, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 6896 times:

This may be the one you are thinking of:

Quote:
RAAF A8-133 (USAF 67-0133): F111C

Crashed and destroyed 29 September 1977 after bird strike (pelican) through canopy at Evans Head Air Weapons Range NSW. Ejection unsuccessful as out of parameters.

The module at Amberley might have been from RAAF A8-137 (USAF 67-0137). It was destroyed at after double engine failure on takeoff. The other module that seems to do the publicity events is from RAAF A8-141 (USAF 67-0141).


User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9104 posts, RR: 75
Reply 5, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 6867 times:



Quoting Cpd (Reply 4):
This may be the one you are thinking of:

Yep, deffo the one.

Quoting Cpd (Reply 4):
The module at Amberley might have been from RAAF A8-137 (USAF 67-0137).

Not sure, I seem to recall that the crew died in the one I saw, that is how/why I remember it. What I was told at the time they initiated the ejection sequence just before the bird came through the window and killed the guy who initiated it.

Maybe it was just a good story, but something I remembered vividly for some time.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineFerrypilot From New Zealand, joined Sep 2006, 897 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 6857 times:



Quoting Zeke (Reply 5):
What I was told at the time they initiated the ejection sequence just before the bird came through the window and killed the guy who initiated it.

Just my own observation, ...but that sure sounds like he was thinking too quick for his own good. Would or could there have been any standing brief or SOP in the RAAF recommending ejection in the seconds before a bird strike???


User currently offlineLegs From Australia, joined Jun 2006, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 6837 times:



Quoting Ferrypilot (Reply 2):
know it was a Pelican.

Not sure if the crew saw it at speed, but the remains are definitely identifiable as a pelican!


User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 6829 times:



Quoting Ferrypilot (Reply 6):
Would or could there have been any standing brief or SOP in the RAAF recommending ejection in the seconds before a bird strike???

What I'm about to say doesn't work PERFECTLY for the f-111 situation due to the capsule, but:
You want to take a man traveling @ 500 kts and at least somewhat shielded by somewhat bulletproof glass, and separate him from said glass (not to mention the radome and everything else in the way) and expose him to impacting birds with only the protection of his flight suit?

PS no matter what A/C, you are arbitrarily destroying the A/C instead of taking the chance the event might be survivable as USUALLY the case is with these incidents. I'm sure all air forces would rather foot the bill for repair versus replacement.


User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9104 posts, RR: 75
Reply 9, posted (6 years 5 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 6792 times:



Quoting Ferrypilot (Reply 6):
Just my own observation, ...but that sure sounds like he was thinking too quick for his own good. Would or could there have been any standing brief or SOP in the RAAF recommending ejection in the seconds before a bird strike???

The previous crash at Evans Heads as far as I know the crew did eject low level at 540 kts after hitting 3 pelicans. That was outside the ejection envelope and not survivable. I cannot find details of the crash at the moment, maybe the nav initiated the eject, and then died from the bird strike, and the pilot died from the ground impact in the capsule.

Quoting Legs (Reply 7):

Not sure if the crew saw it at speed, but the remains are definitely identifiable as a pelican!

Not to mention feathers and DNA.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineFerrypilot From New Zealand, joined Sep 2006, 897 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (6 years 5 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 6598 times:

Actually bird strikes interest me quite a lot as I have had a similar experience to this Pelican accident myself, ...my following account is of a bird strike that I consider I was "very fortunate to survive" unscathed :-

"Falcon 20 Bird Strike". ...I was the First Officer, flying with Captain X. He was in his mid fifties.
In his past he had been variously an RAF pilot, a Hawker test pilot, and a
Tristar captain with a major airline. At the time of the incident we had been friends for
some time, and one of his engaging old flying stories had admitted to
me a longstanding problem with his eyesight. He nevertheless remained a well
above average pilot.

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ian Woodcock


X was in the left seat and handling the Dassault Falcon 20. It was a military sortie for
the Royal Navy and as a consequence we were at low level. I was in the right
hand seat navigating. I had removed my shoulder harness at some point
because it did not fit comfortably, but my lap strap was still tight. We were
flying at 250feet and 250knots(I.A.S.) in smooth air and straight towards a Royal Navy frigate
in an allocated danger area at the entrance to the Firth of Forth in Scotland.
As we had reached the ships overhead X commenced a 45degree banked turn to the right
on to the reciprocal aircraft heading. This was standard and consistent with our brief. As X turned the
aircraft I looked down to my left and entered a new position for the ship
into the Tracor (our navigation equipment) between the seats as briefed by
X. I was aware that X flew the turn accurately as I simultaneously monitored
his flight instruments.

Looking out again as X was rolling the wings level, I immediately saw two
large sea birds. They were mostly white with a little black on their very
long high aspect ratio wings, I recognised them as Gannets. Flying close
together as a pair, in approximately the same direction as us, but slightly
higher (between 50-100feet). I pointed and reported them to X at 1oclock
(30degrees right). At this point we were almost wings level and still
250feet and 250knots (as one might expect X could fly quite accurately) and
I considered that no risk of collision existed. Although clearly, both birds
would pass close.

Well then X advised me that he could not see the birds and I glanced at him
briefly to see if he was looking in the correct location. I also continued
to point at the birds with my left hand. Unfortunately X not only looked
where I indicated, he accidentally I presume, caused or allowed the aircraft
literally to home in that direction as well. Suddenly I was aware of a
Gannet coming backside first at something in the order of 250knots straight
at my face. Without the shoulder straps I was not restrained and ducked left
and down below the instrument panel combing. I believe that I was physically
below the combing but still looking up, when I saw the bird at the point of
bursting exactly through the middle of "my" centre windscreen panel.

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Simon Thomas

..."which is the panel on the left in this photo above"

Then something amazing happened. The gannet was deflected and with inches to
spare tracked vertically up my ( the right hand ) centre windscreen panel.
Disappearing over the roof in line with where my head would normally be just
below. I have still images of this course of events permanently recorded on
my brain. It never actually touched the glass but nevertheless was very
close. I was temporarily shocked for 10 to 15 seconds.

The Gannet went down the starboard engine.
To his credit X had pulled up very quickly and we were passing 1000feet as I
recovered my composure and I saw that he had also pulled the starboard
powerlever into shutoff. He told me that the engine had stopped dead in a
few seconds, and that was the reason for him closing the powerlever to the
shutoff position. I was not happy that he had not confirmed this action with
me first, or for that matter that he had almost managed to stuff my face
into a large seabirds bottom at high speed.

We landed on one engine, but without further incident at Edinburgh, and
headed home soon after on a British Airways 757. The damaged engine had to
be replaced before the aircraft could be recovered to our base.
X and I remained good friends, but X would never discuss what he actually did or
did not see, and when I regaled other pilots with the story in his earshot
he would always insist the two birds had been Sparrows.

The Gannet is said to be the largest seabird in the North Atlantic with a wingspan up to
2 metres, ...at a distance they look a bit like an Albatross.


User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12148 posts, RR: 51
Reply 11, posted (6 years 5 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 6562 times:



Quoting Zeke (Reply 5):
Quoting Cpd (Reply 4):
The module at Amberley might have been from RAAF A8-137 (USAF 67-0137).

Not sure, I seem to recall that the crew died in the one I saw, that is how/why I remember it. What I was told at the time they initiated the ejection sequence just before the bird came through the window and killed the guy who initiated it.

The tail number is close, this is the Amberley AFB F-111 that hit the pelicans, tail A8-127

F-111C 67-0127
A8-127
Crashed and destroyed 13 September 1993 near Guyra NSW during night simulated attack. FATAL.
Killed were FLTLT Jeremy 'Jez' McNess and FLTLT Mark 'CC' Cairns-Cowan. Callsign Buckshot 18.
1st & 2nd images courtesy of Tim Beach - See R.I.A.T - UK Air Show gallery also by Tim Beach
3rd image ?
Memorial dedication 16 May 2000.

It was at night, so they recieved no sighted warning, not that daylight at 540 knots gives you a lot of time either. BTW, the F/RF/FB/EF-111 crew module can safely take the crew out at M 2.2, but you have to be within the ejection envelope. The loss of A8-127 and crew ejected after a rapid attitude change, which at low level is deadly as there isn't enough altitude to level the capsule.

A8-137 crashed in New Zealand, a little over four years earlier.

F-111C 67-0137
A8-137
Crashed and destroyed 24 August 1979 at Ohakea New Zealand after double engine failure on takeoff due water ingestion (prior to 'chimed' nose wheel tires.).
Both crew survived ejection.
Module used in the F-111 software facility at Amberley.
Although the airframe was totally destroyed, both engines were recovered, refurbished, by the RAAF and returned to operational service.The first refurbished engine test flight was flown by the Nav who had ejected from A8-137. He was not informed of the significance of the the test flight until after he returned from the mission.(info Gordo).

Both reference: http://www.f-111.net/t_no_C.htm


User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9104 posts, RR: 75
Reply 12, posted (6 years 5 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 6544 times:



Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 11):
The tail number is close, this is the Amberley AFB F-111 that hit the pelicans, tail A8-127

Both the pelican hits now from what I understand have happened at the Evans Head bombing range which is on the coast during the day. Guyra is inland, and that was a night mission in rain.

The previous tail number that crashed from a pelican strike was 133, that happened in the 1970s, details in reply 4 above.

"Earlier that morning, F-111 A8-133, callsign ‘Falcon 32’, had departed RAAF Base Amberley for the Evans Head Air Weapons range to conduct a conversion course sortie. Falcon 32 had successfully completed two runs and had just turned again for the third when at least three birds, possibly pelicans, struck it in the cockpit front. The birds smashed the cockpit canopies and may have also disabled the crew.
Regardless, the two airmen were placed in a catastrophic situation.

SQNLDR Holt and FLTLT Noordink initiated ejection well outside the safe envelope from the stricken aircraft but, tragically, the crew module struck the ground and they died."

from http://www.defence.gov.au/news/raafn...itions/4820/topstories/story08.htm

I am pretty sure I had seen this escape capsule at Amberly as I remember at the time thinking the capsule survived, but the occupants didn't.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic F111 Hits Pelican, Makes Emergency Landing
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Military aviation related posts only!
  • Not military related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Jet Fuel Tank Hits Road posted Sat Jan 7 2006 09:31:48 by 9VSPO
C-17 Hits A KC-135 Inflight posted Wed Dec 28 2005 23:46:39 by Ha763
The New Boeing Pelican? posted Mon Oct 17 2005 20:50:17 by PhatAlbert
ASY F111's Coming Home? posted Wed Dec 1 2004 08:28:58 by RobK

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format