Sponsor Message:
Military Aviation & Space Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Official STS-125 Atlantis Shuttle Mission Thread  
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 25921 times:

Flight: STS-125 (124th flight of the Space Shuttle)

Mission: Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4

Orbiter: OV-104 Atlantis (30th flight of Atlantis)

Crew:
Scott Altman, Commander (STS-90, STS-106, STS-109)
Gregory Johnson, Pilot (first flight)
Andrew Feustel, Mission Specialist (first flight)
Michael Good, Mission Specialist (first flight)
John Grunsfeld, Mission Specialist (STS-67, STS-81, STS-103, STS-109)
Michael Massamino, Mission Specialist (STS-109)
Megan McArthur, Mission Specialist (first flight)

Launch:
Saturday, October 5, 2008, 3:02am EDT (GMT -4 hrs)
Launch Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

Landing:
Thursday, October 16, 2008. 12:04am EDT
Shuttle Landing Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

STS-125 marks the fifth Space Shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, a mission re-instated following public and political pressure in the wake of former NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe’s 2004 decision to cancel the flight due to concerns that Columbia-like damage would be irreparable and that the Space Shuttle could not sustain a crew in orbit long enough for a rescue mission to be mounted.

Hubble was launched on April 24, 1990 with one instrument in each of its four large, axial bays: the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph, Faint Object Spectrograph, Faint Object Camera, and the Goddard High Speed Photometer. Three Fine Guidance Sensors and the Wide Field/Planetary Camera occupied the four smaller radial bays.

The previous Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions were:

SM-1 (STS-61 Endeavour, December 2, 1993)
Installed Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR), Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2, and new solar arrays, gyroscopes, a computer co-processor, and various electronics upgrades. COSTAR replaced the Goddard High Speed Photometer and gave Hubble clear vision for the first time since its spherical aberration problem was identified in 1990.

SM-2 (STS-82 Discovery, February 11, 1997)
Installed NICMOS, STIS, a refurbished Fine Guidance Sensor, and a solid state data recorder. NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera/Multi-Object Spectrograph) replaced the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph and STIS (Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph) replaced the Faint Object Spectrograph.

SM-3A (STS-103 Discovery, December 19, 1999)
When problems with Hubble’s gyroscopes crippled the spacecraft in late 1999, NASA split the planned SM-3 into two parts. The first mission (3A) would replace Hubble’s problem-plagued gyroscopes and perform other critical repairs, while the second mission (3B) would complete the instrument upgrades originally planned for the mission. SM-3A replaced all six gyroscopes and a Fine Guidance Sensor, and installed a more powerful computer.

SM-3B (STS-109 Columbia, March 1, 2002)
Installed the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), new rigid solar panels, and added a regenerative cooling system for NICMOS’s infrared camera, along with other electronics and power system upgrades. ACS replaced the Faint Object Camera.

SM-4, planned for launch in early October, will be a mix of repairs and new instrument installation. The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) will replace WF/PC-2, which has been Hubble’s workhorse instrument since 1993. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) will replace COSTAR, which is no longer needed because all of Hubble’s current instruments, including COS, have built-in corrective optics.

Two of Hubble’s existing instruments are crippled or not currently functioning: the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) failed in 2004 and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) failed in 2007. Spacewalking astronauts will attempt to repair both instruments. The astronauts will also install a new Fine Guidance Sensor, replacing one which is in a degraded condition, and again replace all six gyroscopes. Finally, the astronauts will install new batteries, add improved thermal insulation, and install a docking target to Hubble for future spacecraft.

Five spacewalks (EVAs) on consecutive days are currently planned. Grunsfeld and Feustel will perform EVAs 1, 3, and 5. Massamino and Good will perform EVAs 2 and 4.

EVA-1: Install gyros and battery
EVA-2: Install COS and second battery
EVA-3: Install WFC-3 and insulation
EVA-4: Repair STIS
EVA-5: Install Fine Guidance Sensor and repair ACS

A sixth EVA, to complete repairs of ACS if they are not finished on EVA-5, is currently being debated within NASA.

STS-125 is the only remaining Space Shuttle mission not planned to dock at the International Space Station, and Hubble’s orbit is incompatible with that of the Space Station, so the “Safe Haven” option is not available in the event Atlantis is damaged in flight and cannot make a safe landing. Without the luxury of the Station’s power and life support reserves, the Atlantis can only support a crew for about 23 days. This is not long enough to roll out a rescue Shuttle and launch it. Therefore, NASA will simultaneously prepare both Atlantis and Endeavour for launch, Atlantis at Pad 39A and Endeavour at Pad 39B. Endeavour is to be ready to launch on a rescue mission within 10 days of call-up.

[Edited 2008-07-25 20:27:33]

152 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 1, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 25921 times:

I'm not sure if people agree with me, but this is a waste of a flight that could be carrying the Centrifuge Accommodations Module and the AMS-02.

Its going to take years before an Orion capsule can reach the machine again, and despite the requirement that Orion be able to service Hubble and satellites near the Earth/Moon and Earth/Sun Lagrange points I am not confident that it will be very feasible to do so. The Hubble was designed with servicing in mind, and it's needed it 4 times in less than 20 years.

My $.2 (inflation, you know). It served its purpose, which was to give NASA new life after Challenger. Now let it die.They should let it fail now, and launch 3 less complicated ones in its place, up to altitudes that are beyond the Shuttle's ceiling where they are more useful at any rate.

NS


User currently offlineChksix From Sweden, joined Sep 2005, 345 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 25898 times:

Hubble is still in it's prime and needed so I agree that the mission is necessary. The surprising thing about the crew selection to me is the big number of rookies on such a complicated mission.


The conveyor belt plane will fly
User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3677 posts, RR: 29
Reply 3, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 25891 times:

Lets hope they launch without problems with the heat shield. Is ist actually possible to see the different route the Shuttle will take at launch, or will it look like every other of the last launches?

User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1896 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 25882 times:

Is the ACS going to be that important anymore? Looking at the specs, it seems like WFC-3 can do almost everything ACS can do plus a lot more over a lot wider spectrum.

They claim to have the breaking wire problem in the gyros fixed, and with new batteries, there's a good chance the old girl could last considerably longer than 5 more years. 10 years of science with WPC-3 and COS would be so far beyond what the original Hubble could do, the original designers must think they're dreaming.

Hubble will go down as the most successful, productive mission in Nasa's history by a huge factor. I'm in favor of calling Griffin in to explain to him that it's his job to find AMS a ride and he needs to remember who he works for, but saying that it's more important than getting these new instruments to Hubble and keeping it going is absurd.
Hubble was ready to launch before Challenger, and Orion has never had a requirement to service Hubble or any other satellite. You might not want to get your science history from Weekly world news.



Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineZANL188 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 3565 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 25884 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting Chksix (Reply 2):
The surprising thing about the crew selection to me is the big number of rookies on such a complicated mission.

Each EVA team has a Hubble veteran. Heck Grunsfeld has been to Hubble enough times he could probably feel his way around the thing blind....

Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 3):
Is ist actually possible to see the different route the Shuttle will take at launch, or will it look like every other of the last launches?

The Hubble mission will head due east out of KSC whereas ISS missions will head northeast up the U.S. east coast.

Quoting Gigneil (Reply 1):
I'm not sure if people agree with me, but this is a waste of a flight that could be carrying the Centrifuge Accommodations Module and the AMS-02.

Hubble & the Space Telescope Science Institute have a lot of friends in Congress...



Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 4 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 25872 times:



Quoting Gigneil (Reply 1):
I'm not sure if people agree with me, but this is a waste of a flight that could be carrying the Centrifuge Accommodations Module and the AMS-02.

The CAM was canceled in 2005 and SM-4 was reinstated in 2006. CAM has been sitting outside a building at a Japanese space center for two years now and It isn't flightworthy, and the centrifuge itself was never completed. Also, one flight couldn't carry both the CAM and AMS.

Quoting Nomadd22 (Reply 4):
I'm in favor of calling Griffin in to explain to him that it's his job to find AMS a ride and he needs to remember who he works for,

He does, that's why he reinstated Hubble SM-4. O'Keefe cancelled it to focus on Space Station, and public opinion was something like 80% against that decision. Something had to give, and it was AMS, which wasn't essential to ISS or which NASA wasn't obligated to launch to ISS for the international partners. Congress belatedly realized that was a mistake and is trying to add an AMS flight, but it might be too late now.

Quoting Nomadd22 (Reply 4):
Is the ACS going to be that important anymore?

Yes, it still can detect fainter objects with much shorter exposures than WFC-3.


User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1896 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 4 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 25859 times:

I'm looking at a space.com article from June 26 that says the Senate and House have both passed bills with different wording requiring and funding AMS launch. It also states that Griffin says all the needed hardware for launch is in the pipeline, and Nasa just needs another 300 to 400 million dollars to do add the mission. All contingent on not being too picky about the end of fiscal 2010 retirement date not slipping, I imagine.
http://www.space.com/news/080626-senate-extra-shuttle-mission.html



Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 4 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 25857 times:



Quoting Gigneil (Reply 1):
The Hubble was designed with servicing in mind, and it's needed it 4 times in less than 20 years.

Note that all but one of these missions added new, state-of-the-art instruments, allowing Hubble to use modern electronics, etc., as they became available (WFC-3 is a 16 megapixel camera system, for example.) This was a design feature dating back to the Large Space Telescope proposal in the late 1960s. Hubble also now has an order of magnitude more data storage capabilty than it did at launch, and has much faster computers, allowing it to do more work in less time.

Quoting Gigneil (Reply 1):
It served its purpose, which was to give NASA new life after Challenger.

No, Hubble was the culmination of the Large Space Telescope project that succeeded the small Orbiting Astronomical Observatories of the 1960s. It was approved in 1978 and was scheduled for launch in September, 1986, but the Challenger accident delayed it until 1990.

Quoting Gigneil (Reply 1):
They should let it fail now, and launch 3 less complicated ones in its place, up to altitudes that are beyond the Shuttle's ceiling where they are more useful at any rate.

They already launches many other astronomy satellites in service...

Chandra X-Ray Observatory (1999)
Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (2003)
Galaxy Evolution Explorer (2003)
Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (2008)
High Energy Transient Explorer (2000)
Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (1995)
Spitzer Space Telescope (2003)
Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (1998)
Swift (2004)
Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (2001)

NASA also participates in international missions such as INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton.


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 4 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 25846 times:



Quoting Nomadd22 (Reply 7):
I'm looking at a space.com article from June 26 that says the Senate and House have both passed bills with different wording requiring and funding AMS launch. It also states that Griffin says all the needed hardware for launch is in the pipeline, and Nasa just needs another 300 to 400 million dollars to do add the mission. All contingent on not being too picky about the end of fiscal 2010 retirement date not slipping, I imagine.

If there are no more schedule hits (say 60 days or more) they should be able to get off one more flight before the end of FY2010. The last flight is presently scheduled for May 31, 2010, leaving four months for one more flight. So everyone hope for no more hail storms or ECO sensor fiascoes.

My understanding is that they're going to refurbish the External Tank that was damaged during Hurricane Katrina (ET-122, I think) and written off. It will serve as a rescue launch's ET, if necessary. The new-build current rescue launch ET will instead fly STS-134 (AMS and probably some more spares or maybe the Spacehab module) if approved.


User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 10, posted (6 years 4 months 18 hours ago) and read 25773 times:

Is the Spacehab module the inflatable one, or a fixed habitation module?

If I'm not mistaken, and I often am, Congress made the inflatable hab illegal specifically to get NASA moving on other projects - a mistake, I believe.

NS


User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1896 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 4 months 17 hours ago) and read 25768 times:

Spacehab is a company. Found at the unlikely web address of spacehab.com. They supplied the pressurized modules the shuttle used for research and cargo, and unpressurized cargo carriers along with a slew of other services across all sectors of space based industries.
The Transhab inflatable module that Nasa was working on was cancelled partly at the behest of a congressman who had an interest in the Lockheed rigid habitation module, which was also never completed. Nasa sold all the rights and patents to Bigelow aerospace, who's developing the concept into hotels and research modules. He's already launched two subscale models.
The much maligned Wikipedia has a good summary of the project.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transhab



Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3677 posts, RR: 29
Reply 12, posted (6 years 4 months 17 hours ago) and read 25767 times:



Quoting Thorny (Reply 9):
If there are no more schedule hits (say 60 days or more) they should be able to get off one more flight before the end of FY2010.

But would they really want to do that? My impression was that they wanted to get the Shuttle program over with the least amount of flights needed to get the ISS construction finished and Hubble repaired (the only exemtion of that rule). Or did this approach towards the shuttle change recently?


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (6 years 4 months 17 hours ago) and read 25765 times:



Quoting Gigneil (Reply 10):
Is the Spacehab module the inflatable one, or a fixed habitation module?

Spacehab is a small module that stays in the Shuttle's payload bay and can be used for delivering pressurized cargo to the Station when there isn't enough room in the payload bay for an MPLM. It last flew on STS-118.

You can see it in the middle of the payload bay in these photos...
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/...tle/sts-118/hires/iss015e21732.jpg
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/...tle/sts-118/hires/iss015e22574.jpg

Columbia was lost with the Spacehab Double Module, which is twice as long.

I think AMS will only take up about 1/3 of the payload bay, which means NASA will have a little over another third of the payload bay to fill. Spacehab could do it, or perhaps NASA will add a fifth Express Logistics Carrier.


User currently offlineNomadd22 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1896 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (6 years 4 months 17 hours ago) and read 25759 times:

I believe that the AMS is about 7 tons plus whatever the carrier would be, so there would be plenty of payload mass left over.
I was about to ask something about Node 3, but I guess we've drifted off the STS-125 topic enough for the thread.



Andy Goetsch
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (6 years 4 months 16 hours ago) and read 25746 times:



Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 12):
Or did this approach towards the shuttle change recently?

Congress is pushing NASA to add one more flight for AMS. If NASA can pull that off without slipping into Fiscal Year 2011, so much the better.


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 25435 times:

NASA has elected not to advance the launch of STS-125 a few days, staying with the original launch date.

Liftoff of STS-125 is now scheduled for 1:34 am EDT, Wednesday, October 8, 2008.

Landing will be at 10:30pm EDT, Saturday, October 18.

The few days' advance had been intended to give more time to launch the subsequent flight, STS-126, before sun angles on the combined Shuttle/Station stack prevent launches from late November to late December. STS-126 is scheduled for launch on November 10, 2008.


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (6 years 3 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 25253 times:

Delayed nearly a week by Tropical Storm Fay, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolled into the Vehicle Assembly Building late this evening. Atlantis will be attached to its External Tank, with rollout to Launch Pad 39A expected late next week.

Launch is still on schedule for October 8, but Fay ate up a big chunk of margin in the processing schedule.


User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21796 posts, RR: 55
Reply 18, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 25015 times:

Rollout is scheduled for tomorrow, but with Hurricane Hanna due to at least pass by the coast if not make landfall this week, they might decide to wait until after it passes to send Atlantis to the pad.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 25005 times:

Rollout is now officially no earlier than 12:00 am Wednesday. But that's vanishingly unlikely as long as Hanna's course still has a fair chance of making landfall near Cape Canaveral. By the time we know it won't, it will be getting too close to roll out the Shuttle.

Personally, I don't expect rollout until next Saturday at the earliest unless Hanna makes a major course-change to the east. Hanna is forecast to pass Cape Canaveral on Thursday night as a Category 1 or 2. It will likely be far enough offshore that there won't be any significant damage to KSC, but it will cause weather problems for another two days beyond close approach, at least, and they need 8 hours of clear skies for rollout. Sunday or Monday rollout isn't out of the question.

This will push launch out to October 13 or 14, I think, which narrows the window for the subsequent Endeavour launch (Nov 10 currently, but slipping one-for-one with Atlantis launch delays which kick in starting around the middle of this week.) I think the odds of Endeavour flying STS-126 this year are fading fast, unless NASA changes its collective mind and decides to launch 126 from 39B (saving one week of processing time currently planned for the move from 39B to 39A.)


User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21796 posts, RR: 55
Reply 20, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 24996 times:

How much can the stack withstand if it's out on the pad with the RSS attached?

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 24952 times:



Quoting Mir (Reply 20):
How much can the stack withstand if it's out on the pad with the RSS attached?

About 50 mph, if memory serves. If they expect Tropical Storm force winds, the rule is to roll back.


User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 24927 times:

Rollout to Pad 39A is now officially no earlier than Saturday. October 11 launch is still do-able, assuming Tropical Storm Hanna does not interfere with other preparations at KSC and Tropical Storm Ike does not follow the same path.

User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7965 posts, RR: 12
Reply 23, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 24919 times:

My favourite blog comes with some amazing photos (again):

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/200...09/preparing_to_rescue_hubble.html



I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlineThorny From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 24848 times:

Tropical Storm Hanna has moved farther east and is no longer a threat to the Cape Canaveral area.

NASA began the rollout of Atlantis at 9:19 am Thursday.

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=37288

Click S, M, or L for small, medium or large versions of the photograph.

More pictures here...
http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4


25 Mir : Unfortunately, with Ike on the way, NASA may have to roll back to the VAB at some point soon. -Mir
26 Blackknight : Question: How is the boost to the higher orbit (greater than the ISS) accomplished. One additional RMS boost or several? I am in the dark here can som
27 Mir : Probably just a longer OMS 2 burn. Thorny will probably correct me if I'm wrong, but IIRC the Shuttle launches to a highly elliptical orbit, and then
28 Thorny : Space Shuttle Endeavour rolled into the Vehicle Assembly Building early this morning for stacking with her External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters. En
29 TheSonntag : Does this mean a full roll-back to VAB for Endeavour if the STS-125 mission goes as planned, or is there a shortcut to the other Pad?
30 Thorny : No, just a "roll around". They back out to the fork in the crawlerway between the two pads and then put it back in "forward", as it were, and go in t
31 Post contains links and images Eksath : Here you go: Atlantis rollout View Large View MediumPhoto © Suresh A. Atapattu
32 Post contains links Thorny : STS-400/STS-126 Endeavour was rolled out to Launch Pad 39B overnight Thursday/Friday, following a 24 hour delay due to weather. Meanwhile, the STS-125
33 Post contains images ZANL188 : Cool... Too bad we won't see back to back or, dare i say it, simultaneous launches!!
34 Post contains links Thorny : NASA has posted photos of today's "double exposure" at the KSC media gallery... http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4 Here's a nice one...
35 Post contains links ZANL188 : Commander Altman says the crew needs more time for training due to time lost while JSC was closed for Hurricane Ike. NASA considering slipping the lau
36 Post contains links ZANL188 : It's official... Now launching no earlier than 14 Oct http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html Sept. 24, 2008 The target launch date
37 Thorny : I hope there aren't any more delays. Landing is now 8:07pm ET on Oct 25, which is 7:07 Central Time, or only a few minutes after sunset. We might bare
38 TheSonntag : How long will Hubble continue to work after this servicing mission has been completed? This is the absolutely final mission to hubble, Orion cannot do
39 Thorny : It is generally thought that this mission will take Hubble to 2013. This mission will attach a docking target/collar to Hubble's base, so that future
40 Post contains images DfwRevolution : Shucks, beat to the punch [Edited 2008-09-25 11:11:26]
41 Nomadd22 : The 2013 date is just NASA's traditionly overly conservative estimate. With the gyro problem supposedly fixed and new batteries a lot of people are h
42 Post contains links Rwessel : An article at NewScientist Space: http://space.newscientist.com/articl...d-by-effects-of-hurricane-ike.html According to the text one reason that NASA
43 Post contains links Thorny : In the ISS's present configuration, there are periods during the year when the position of the sun relative to the plane of the orbit ("the beta angle
44 Rwessel : But why not alter ISS's attitude to provide the required angles. There is a non-rotating attitude (XPH) already defined for use during the assembly s
45 Thorny : My guess is MMOD (micrometeoroid / orbital debris) concerns.
46 Nomadd22 : They might be worried about messing with the thermal cycling on the 14 billion odd parts of the station.
47 Post contains links Thorny : BREAKING NEWS... Hubble suffered a major failure in orbit on Saturday. http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts125/080929hubble/ It is now looking li
48 DfwRevolution : Is there too much paper work involved with moving the -126 payload/crew to fly on Atlantis by mid/late-October, and then fly -119 on Endeavour in Nove
49 Thorny : The Orbiter Docking System was removed from Atlantis for the Hubble mission. She can't dock at ISS until it is put back in (which requires demating a
50 Mir : NOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!! I was really looking forward to another night launch. -Mir
51 Thorny : Latest news from today's press conference... Hubble itself is not in danger. Still doing some science using Fine Guidance Sensors for astrometry, but
52 Nomadd22 : I'm sure a lot of people can't believe the timing. A month earlier or later and the B side could have been activated and they could have decided to le
53 Post contains images ZANL188 : Pix of the failed unit. Looks to be fairly easy to get at on the inside of a door....
54 BEG2IAH : Too bad for other setbacks, but Hubble malfunctioned at the best possible moment. What if Atlantis had been launched, Hubble serviced for the last tim
55 TheSonntag : Why do they shift the Pad?
56 Thorny : The Payload Changeout Room at 39B is not up to spec. It has not been maintained since there are no plans to launch a payload from that pad again (the
57 KPDX : So the next shuttle mission at all is next year?
58 Thorny : No. STS-126 Endeavour on November 14.
59 Post contains links SNA350 : Atlantis is back at the VAB, clearing the way for Endeavour http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html
60 EGTESkyGod : Michael Good and his family are friends of ours, we were delighted to receive their annual postcard at Christmas, with a picture of Mike in his Spaces
61 Post contains links Connies4ever : This is not a good sign: http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...x-failure-threatens-telescope.html Hubble's career may in fact be somewhat shorter tha
62 Thorny : NASA has some serious thinking to do. I hope they take their time and make a good one (the decision to delay STS-125 earlier this month was made far
63 Post contains links Connies4ever : Looks like Hubble itself is operating just fine, but the backup science data formatter is not responding correctly during its' qualification: http://w
64 Thorny : With STS-119 Discovery safely home, we're back to STS-125 being Number 1 on the Runway. Launch is now scheduled for 1:11pm EDT, May 12, 2009. Atlantis
65 Mir : What do the launch windows for a Hubble rendezvous look like? I imagine they'd be different from the ten minute ISS windows. -Mir
66 Thorny : About 45 minutes.
67 Nomadd22 : Did they finally decide on dual pad because the Ares test was delayed, or they didn't want to take so long to launch a rescue? Has the formatter finis
68 Thorny : At the post-flight press conference today, NASA said a lot of the work to modify Pad B was done in the interim, so the delay to Ares 1X by sticking w
69 Thorny : STS-125 Atlantis rolled out to Launch Pad 39A this morning. STS-400/STS-127 Endeavour is scheduled to go to the VAB on April 10 and roll out to Launch
70 TheSonntag : If we assume STS-125 goes all well, how long will it take to get Endeavour ready at Pad A for the next mission?
71 Thorny : One month. Some of this is pad repair time, moving 125's MLP off the pad, etc. Then moving 127's stack to 39A and making all the connections again. T
72 Post contains links Nomadd22 : Chris Bergin has made an excellent update available to non paying customers. It includes information on the efforts to make sure the leak that delayed
73 Thorny : Endeavour rolled into the Vehicle Assembly Building on Friday morning. She will be attached to her External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters in preparat
74 BEG2IAH : Did Thorny leave A.net? His profile is non-existent. I hope it's only a technical glitch. BEG2IAH
75 ZANL188 : Endeavour rolled out to Pad 39B this morning... Sad to see Thorny go... He's still active over at Nasaspaceflight.com though
76 Post contains links DingDong : Looks like they're thinking about moving up the launch by a day to May 11 due to a range conflict a few days later and wanting not to lose a potential
77 TheSonntag : STS-125 is go for launch in 10 days from now. Quite a shame Thorny left...
78 Nomadd22 : Looks like the radiator that was attacked by the rogue socket will be fixed by the end of the day with no delay to the mission. About the only remaini
79 Post contains links DingDong : T-1 day 6 hours 59 minutes 02 seconds as of right now. For the Twitterati here... you can follow MS4 Mike Massimino by following Astro_Mike on Twitter
80 ZANL188 : Astronauts just boarded the astro van and are enroute to pad 39A...
81 Post contains links ZANL188 : Neat bit of trivia: Cdr Altman was one of the US Navy F-14 pilots that assisted with the making of Top Gun.... http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/200
82 ZANL188 : Crew on the pad and heading up to the white room.
83 ZANL188 : Another bit o'trivia: At launch time today Hubble will be in the sky over Kennedy Space Center, actually over the Gulf of Mexico. This does not necess
84 ZANL188 : White room crew backing out of crew module now..... FYI: Todays launch can be seen on NASA TV, HDNET, and the Science Channel that I know of, possibly
85 Post contains links DingDong : I've got relatives living 10 minutes from JSC. Over there, NASA TV is, if I recall correctly, part of the standard basic(?) cable lineup -- premium c
86 ZANL188 : I have DISH as well. Have you checked out channel 212 today? I'm curious if we'll be able to see the launch on 212, but won't be watching it as all 3
87 ZANL188 : Well I got my NASA TV website working... so I have a sat receiver tuner available to record channel 212, earth channel, on DISH Network....
88 ZANL188 : Go for launch!!!! Go for Launch!!! Godspeed Atlantis!
89 Longhornmaniac : T-minus 3:30 and counting. Godspeed, Atlantis! Cheers, Cameron
90 TheSonntag : Atlantis is on orbit now. Seemed to go as planned, although you could clearly see the differences in trajectory compared to ISS missions.
91 ZANL188 : Some interesting calls early on... Sounds like an instrumentation problem....
92 Glideslope : What would be a "minor transient at lift off? This is what is on the CNN Video. Too me it looked like the bottom sort of "scooted" horizontally for a
93 ZANL188 : The SSME thrust has a considerable horizontal component and will "push" the entire stack towards the north side of the pad.
94 Dalb777 : Haha, I noticed that also, very interesting. However, that trajectory lost video feed before the external tank ejection, unlike ISS missions.[Edited
95 TheSonntag : They also lost communications for some minutes during the mission. I guess they have 100% coverage on the ISS missions...
96 Fsnuffer : NASA just did an edited replay of the ascent flight team. Was amazing to watch them calmly handle the "ducer" problem that lead to the two ignore call
97 Nomadd22 : Because of the more equatorial inclination of the Hubble launch, they has LOS earlier than normal.
98 DingDong : Yep. Wonder why... but the only person who can answer that is Thorny, and as curious as I am, I'm sure he had his reasons -- whatever they may be. Do
99 ZANL188 : Appeared to be a cloudless sky but when I played it back i got nada. This is about the ET rocketcam. I believe the ET has it's own comm thru MILA for
100 DingDong : Interesting. Oh well, was worth a shot. Ahh, gotcha. Thanks!
101 SNA350 : From what I've heard is that Atlantis is now in an elliptical orbit to catch up with Hubble. How does it go from an elliptical to cicular orbit then?
102 Rwessel : Yes. They'll do a burn at (or near) apogee to bring the perigee (on the opposite side of the orbit) up. Pretty much, but ISS is in a rather lower orb
103 Post contains links SNA350 : Thanks for your answer Rwessel btw: here's nice website that tracks both Shuttle and Hubble so you should be able to see them catch up today http://ww
104 ZANL188 : Hubble now 350 feet from Atlantis.... Should have a grapple within a half hour...
105 Sinlock : Capture!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That was pretty cool to watch. Crew did a good job with the unexpected maneuver's[Edited 2009-05-13 10:23:23]
106 Nomadd22 : WFC3 is in and has passed initial checkout. They're working on the data handler now. The one Hubble picture that really floored me was the Ultra Deep
107 Nomadd22 : They're hitting a snag. First two Gyros went in fine, but the third doesn't want to seat. They're pulling the first one back out and trying it in the
108 Nomadd22 : They never got the new #3 gyro to seat, so they put a refurbished spare in. Not optimal, but it'll do. 1 1/2 hours behind, but they should get everyth
109 Nomadd22 : EVA 3 is done. COSTAR is out, COS is in and the ACS repair went well. That should fix the wide field channel in the ACS and they're hoping the high re
110 TheSonntag : Great. Is Endeavour still on Standby, btw?
111 Nomadd22 : Endeavour should stand down ( As in stopping launch processing) soon, when they're done analyzing some late inspection data. They'll roll her over to
112 ZANL188 : Interesting snag has arisen... An EVA handrail must be removed prior to installing the Fastener Capture Plate (used to remove the cover plate for the
113 ZANL188 : Handrail removed on the first pull.... amazing
114 Nomadd22 : STIS repair is done. It's not doing so well in testing so far, but they think they might just need to let some thermal sensors warm up for a while. AC
115 Post contains images Mir : Is it just me, or does the NASA TV feed sometimes show the video from the mission and the audio from FoxNews?    EDIT: Ok, got it fixed. That was wi
116 Sinlock : Pretty funny getting to hear Mike Massimino and Good do some mild swearing when the capture plate would not fit properly in it's storage box. Thought
117 Nomadd22 : EVA 5 is done. Hubble has been turned loose to roam the universe again. Everything looks good except the ACS High Resolution Channel, and they didn't
118 AirCatalonia : Atlantis is scheduled to return to the Kennedy Space Center tomorrow at 10am. Hopefully the weather will be good enough to allow the landing.
119 Mir : I doubt it. It's been cloudy for four days straight (three of them with constant rain - DAB is getting some flooding), and it's supposed to be the sa
120 SNA350 : Launch has officially been postponed due to weather at KSC. How long can they postpone landing before they HAVE to land?
121 Mir : I think they can put it off a couple of days. But with the weather in Florida looking to remain constant until Sunday, I have a feeling this one will
122 BigWNFan : It will land by Sunday. They are saying Monday will be the end of consumables. When I looked at forecasts for all three landing sites last night, EDW
123 DiamondFlyer : I'm not. Sure, it would be really cool, but IIRC, the sand really, really damages the thermal protection system. Think sandblaster on those tiles. No
124 BigWNFan : You are right DiamondFlyer...I am just daydreaming. Maybe for Atlantis' last flight. I know they are going to do whatever they can to prevent a landin
125 ZANL188 : First landing opportunity this morning at KSC waived off due to weather. Forecast for KSC is not good. I bet we go to Edwards today....
126 ZANL188 : KSC WX not cooperating today. All landing opportunities for today have been waived off. Will try again tommorrow. Crew backing out of all deorbit prep
127 Post contains links ZANL188 : NASASpaceflight.com has a good article regarding todays waveoff as well as issues introduced by the ASA failure: Atlantis is still waiting on the weat
128 ZANL188 : WX at KSC is too dynamic, KSC waived off. Going to Edwards, deorbit burn in about 20 minutes.
129 Mir : Well, they really tried for KSC, but it isn't going to happen. Deorbit burn to EDW in about 20 minutes. Shame - I was getting excited about heading do
130 ZANL188 : Burn: 1024EDT, 0724PDT Landing: 1139EDT, 0839PDT edit: daylight time[Edited 2009-05-24 07:18:54]
131 Aircatalonia :
132 ZANL188 : Crew given the GO for the deorbit burn....
133 ZANL188 : Deorbit burn underway. Burn will slow Atlantis by 267 feet per second.... 2 minute 36 second burn[Edited 2009-05-24 07:25:39]
134 SNA350 : Deorbit burn is underway
135 TheSonntag : Burn complete, no action required... Lets hope they come home safely!
136 ZANL188 : Good burn. No trims required. Message on APU 2: Drainline temp slightly elevated - no action.
137 TheSonntag : Atlantis about to enter the atmosphere...
138 ZANL188 : 15:50 to touchdown. All quiet. 202,000 ft alt, 1080 miles to go
139 ZANL188 : 320 miles. 10:30 to go
140 ZANL188 : Got a picture from Edwards now...
141 ZANL188 : 2 booms!! ddd ddd
142 ZANL188 : Touchdown!! Good show!!
143 TheSonntag : Great mission! To me it seems that there were quite more concerned calls during launch than at any mission I saw in the last years, as well as the APU
144 ZANL188 : Yes Great Mission and last time we will see Hubble upclose. I also note that the starboard ET door did not open completely after wheel stop.
145 Connies4ever : Outstanding mission from start to finish ! I am continually amazed by the resourcefulness of the various crews, and particularly the Hubble mission cr
146 C767P : I apologize if this is not the right place to ask this, but didn’t want to start a new thread since it isn’t that big of a deal. Does anyone know
147 ZANL188 : Edwards processing is timed out at 7 days. ... and then there is weather so you can figure a week from Monday for starters...
148 Vikkyvik : Well, I vaguely remember getting woken up this morning by some distant sound/vibration, and I vaguely remember the thought "earthquake" going through
149 ZANL188 : The new SI C&DH burped last week and put Hubble into safe mode..... Hubble Space Telescope Status Report 06.18.09 On June 15, 2009 at approximately 2:
150 ZANL188 : If the timing had been a little different the ASA issue could have caused a Redundant Set abort prior to T-0. From NasaSpaceflight.com: Work started o
151 Post contains links ZANL188 : Per NasaSpaceflight.com, Lamp knob wedged against pressure window may ground Atlantis for 6 months... This is odd. A lamp knob got wedged against a pr
152 Post contains links ZANL188 : Good News! Per Nasaspaceflight.com Atlantis will not need it's window replaced! http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2009/...wn-atlantis-window-damage-clear
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Official STS-125 Atlantis Shuttle Mission Thread
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Military aviation related posts only!
  • Not military related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Official STS-123 Mission Thread posted Mon Feb 18 2008 08:27:05 by Thorny
Official STS-122 Mission Thread posted Wed Nov 7 2007 12:04:26 by JetBlueGuy2006
Official STS-116 Discovery Mission Thread posted Thu Sep 21 2006 17:58:25 by JetBlueGuy2006
Official STS-120 Thread posted Wed Aug 22 2007 11:12:15 by TheSonntag
Official STS-118 Thread - Teacher In Space posted Sat Jun 23 2007 15:39:30 by ZANL188
Official STS-117 Thread (S3/S4) And More Arrays! posted Sat Dec 23 2006 03:40:31 by TedTAce
Offical STS-115 Atlantis Thread posted Mon Jul 24 2006 07:10:43 by TPAnx
Official STS-121 Discovery Thread posted Tue Jun 27 2006 22:38:10 by TedTAce
Official 'Great New England Air Show' Thread posted Tue Jul 8 2008 08:28:30 by ChrisNH
Shuttle Mission 51-C posted Thu Oct 4 2007 18:20:07 by KDTWFlyer
Official STS-125 Atlantis Shuttle Mission Thread posted Fri Jul 25 2008 20:21:48 by Thorny
Official STS-128 Discovery Shuttle Mission Thread posted Fri Aug 21 2009 19:16:50 by BEG2IAH
Official STS-127 Endeavour Shuttle Mission Thread posted Sun May 24 2009 11:57:31 by ZANL188
Official STS-119 Discovery Shuttle Mission Thread posted Mon Jan 19 2009 00:18:29 by SNA350
Official STS-126 Endeavour Shuttle Mission Thread posted Wed Oct 15 2008 07:43:46 by Thorny
Official STS-124 Discovery Mission Thread posted Thu Mar 27 2008 13:49:40 by Thorny
Official STS-123 Mission Thread posted Mon Feb 18 2008 08:27:05 by Thorny
Official STS-122 Mission Thread posted Wed Nov 7 2007 12:04:26 by JetBlueGuy2006
Official STS-116 Discovery Mission Thread posted Thu Sep 21 2006 17:58:25 by JetBlueGuy2006
Official STS130 Space Shuttle Endeavour Thread posted Sun Jan 10 2010 10:28:29 by ZANL188

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format