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Charles Kennedy Admits Alcohol Problem  
User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1768 times:

Charles Kennedy ( for those not in the UK he is the leader of the 3rd largest political party here) has finally admitted he has an alcohol problem and is to seek help.
This has sparked a leadership election in which Mr Kennedy will stand.
Has he done the right thing?
I think he has and his admission can only strenghten his image and help him re gain his stature.

Good luck to him in his rehabilitation

39 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offline9VSPO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1758 times:

Quoting Cosec59 (Thread starter):
This has sparked a leadership election in which Mr Kennedy will stand

That depends on how many drinks he's had.  Wink


User currently offlineWhiteHatter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1754 times:

Quoting Cosec59 (Thread starter):
Charles Kennedy ( for those not in the UK he is the leader of the 3rd largest political party here) has finally admitted he has an alcohol problem and is to seek help.

I went to university with Kennedy (he's a few years older than me) and he was a terrible piss-artist then.

Twenty five years later, he's still hard at it. God alone knows what state his liver is in.

Quoting Cosec59 (Thread starter):
This has sparked a leadership election in which Mr Kennedy will stand.

he should stand aside and get his own life in order first.


User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1751 times:

Quoting 9VSPO (Reply 1):
That depends on how many drinks he's had.

He has stated he has not had a drink in 2 months.
His decision to speak out shows a great deal of courage especially as a man so much in the public eye


User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1747 times:

Quoting WhiteHatter (Reply 2):
he should stand aside and get his own life in order first.

good comment. I hope he does mange to get his life back in order


User currently offline9VSPO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1744 times:



User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 6, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1732 times:

Right. So all those questions over all those years about his drinking were answered with complete lies then, were they?

Both Kennedy himself, AND the Lib Dems in general denied that he had a drink problem time after time after time. Now we hear that he's had this problem for some considerable time.

Good on him for coming out and admitting it. But it might have been better if they hadn't been lying about it for quite so long.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1724 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 6):
Both Kennedy himself, AND the Lib Dems in general denied that he had a drink problem time after time after time.

But doesn't everyone in his situation?
I have employed a recovering alcoholic and he is excellent at his job.


User currently offlineNWOrientDC10 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1404 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1721 times:
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Speaking for myself, I'll put my trust in a flawed leader who admits his mistakes rather than these fake, "perfect" things we have here in the States

Russell



Things aren't always as they seem
User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 9, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1714 times:

Quoting Cosec59 (Reply 7):
But doesn't everyone in his situation?

Sure. But we're talking about a person who runs for political office. Isn't trust the very central issue? "Over the last 18 months" he said. He's been asked the question in that time - and denied it.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1700 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 9):
He's been asked the question in that time - and denied it.

Media pressure i guess. But as NWOrientDC10 says, at least he has shown himself to be human and not a cliche as the other 2 leaders


User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13230 posts, RR: 77
Reply 11, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1699 times:

Problem is, he sort help 18 months ago, (after much heavy criticism about not turning up for a budget debate, his sweating, uncertain performance at a Lib Dem spring conference weeks later).
So he's been telling porkies for all this time.
Only admitting it now after being confronted by evidence he has this problem.
Understandable perhaps, from a purely personal perspective.
But a bit unacceptable to try and lead, including during a general election, while battling his illness.

Though he often cites gaining seats last year, the Lib Dems had a great opportunity in the election, Iraq had made Labour very unpopular with a lot of people, who'd never vote Tory.
The Tories were not much better off, hence their rather desperate election campaign, with it's often, in the greater scheme of things, petty obsessions.

So the Lib Dems did not do as well as expected, the 'decapitation' effort (forewarned to their opponents), against senior Tories in marginal seats, failed.
Remember his highly embarrassing, mumbling, clueless performance when asked about his policies? At the time he said it was tiredness at having a newborn first child, everyone now will think he had in fact been 'wetting the baby's head' too much.

Since the election there has been no leadership from him, now the Cameron threat of (belatedly) re-positioning the Tories radically, has made many Lib Dem MP's fear for their seats.

Nothing personal against Kennedy, I wish him well, he seems a nice bloke, but he has always been unsuited as a major party leader.
He was perhaps chosen as an antidote to the energetic Paddy Ashdown, at heart the Lib Dems are a sleepy lot, so 'chatshow Charlie' seemed a good choice.
Unencumbered as they are by ever being in government since the WW1 period.

They are also a very opportunistic bunch, if your house looks prosperous, the line from a Lib Dem canvasser will tow a moderate line, very centre ground.
On a housing estate, they'll out Labour Old Labour.
An election anecdote from last year had a Lib Dem canvasser talking to a voter, then the voter produced a recent Lib Dem document that contradicted everying the Canvasser had just said, he's misjudged the sort of home/likely voter political affiliation.
The Lib Dem swore and trooped off.


User currently offlineMatt72033 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 1617 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1693 times:

When you see how big a thing it is for people to admit being an alcoholic, you have to applaud someone that admits it in front of the whole nation!

User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1682 times:

Quoting Matt72033 (Reply 12):
you have to applaud someone that admits it in front of the whole nation!

 yes   checkmark   checkmark 


User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1680 times:

Quoting NWOrientDC10 (Reply 8):
Speaking for myself, I'll put my trust in a flawed leader who admits his mistakes rather than these fake, "perfect" things we have here in the States

Yeah... the dude, like all alcoholics, is weak-- but at least he can admit it.

Never a cause for blame with our current administration, it's disgusting.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 15, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1678 times:

Quoting Cosec59 (Reply 10):
at least he has shown himself to be human and not a cliche as the other 2 leaders

You have to be slightly careful about that. When David Cameron started talking about the NHS yesterday (the first time he's really gone into battle over a policy matter), a lot of people dismissed it as just another Tory lying through his teeth. But Cameron has a seriously ill son, and has spent a damn sight more time in hospitals than most of us.

Quoting GDB (Reply 11):
Understandable perhaps, from a purely personal perspective.
But a bit unacceptable to try and lead, including during a general election, while battling his illness.

Exactly so. On a personal level, entirely understandable. But look at it this way, had there been a shock result (however unlikely it was) you could now have had a Prime Minister, or a Cabinet minister if there'd been a hung Parliament, coming out and admitting a drink problem having denied it all this time. That's the problem.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineSkidmarks From UK - England, joined Dec 2004, 7121 posts, RR: 55
Reply 16, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1675 times:

Can't see the problem really. The guy has held the job down with no real after effects. Lying about it? Well, I would like to bet that no-one on here would say a word until they had to, if they were in a similar position.

As for undermining his integrity, thats a crock of crap. ALL politicians lie, it's in the blood (along with the alcohol and other suspicious substances) and for anyone to expect a politician of ANY party to openly come out and admit something like that until he had to, or the press (scum) forced his hand, is delusioned.

As NWOrientDC10 said, I would rather trust a politician that admitted he'd lied than one that insisted he was squeaky clean whatever happened.

Not that I like politicians much. Especially those across the water in the UK. Now, in the IOM, we KNOW our politicians are stupid Big grin

Human beings are fallible. We just expect politicians to be perfect - which is NEVER going to happen!

Andy  old 



Growing old is compulsory, growing up is optional
User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13148 posts, RR: 15
Reply 17, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1666 times:

The current President Bush admitted to having a serious problem with alcohol a number of years ago after a bad experience and hasn't drank since then. Maybe he killed off a few critical brain cells that he needs now.
There have been a number of politicans whom had alcohol problems, but were still highly respected and sound leaders. Still, if the problems become public (as apparently with Mr. C. Kennedy's case), and you lie out of a natural human trait of denial for a long time, it does hurt your trust. Maybe in this man's case his doctor gave him a warning of how much his drinking was hurting his health, hurting others and will limit his ability to go for the position he wants. Let's hope he sticks with it.


User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13230 posts, RR: 77
Reply 18, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1651 times:

C'mon Skidmarks, these suspicions about Kennedy did not appear from nowhere.
How many hopeless, televised, attempts to fail to understand your own policies, absences from important Parliamentary debates (unlike a PM, he has not got matters of state, often abroad, to attend to), hopeless performances in front of his own party at a conference, do you need?
General lengthy lacklustre spells too?

It's British politics worst kept secret, which he lied about many, many times, while presuming to be able to lead a party at a critical time for them.

It is sad, but (even by Lib Dem standards), he was promoted way beyond his ability.
Maybe that helped cause, or add to, his very real illness.

He's a nice guy I'm sure, but while I don't see myself as paranoid, loathe what the likes of the Daily Mail stand for, but if by some chance, Kennedy had become PM, I'd fear for this country.
He just has not got what it takes, I'm sure he is a good MP for his constituents when he is well, but that was always his limit.


User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (8 years 10 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1649 times:

Quoting GDB (Reply 18):
Kennedy had become PM, I'd fear for this country.

A much better choice than Cameron though


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 20, posted (8 years 10 months 15 hours ago) and read 1623 times:

Quoting GDB (Reply 18):
It's British politics worst kept secret, which he lied about many, many times, while presuming to be able to lead a party at a critical time for them.

Even more than that, he forced a number of journalists into very public retractions when they alleged he had a drinking problem. Jeremy Paxman for one was hauled over the coals for daring to suggest it might be an issue.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offline9VSPO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (8 years 10 months 7 hours ago) and read 1606 times:

He will be gone by next week. Time to get down to Ladbrokes I think!  Wink

User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (8 years 10 months 7 hours ago) and read 1595 times:

Quoting ConcordeBoy (Reply 14):
Yeah... the dude, like all alcoholics, is weak-- but at least he can admit it.

Weak in what way?

The only weak alcoholic is the one who doesn't admit his problem and seek treatment.

I'm a recovering alcoholic. There are others on a.net. More than you may think! Are you calling us all weak?

Mark

[Edited 2006-01-06 18:27:50]

User currently offline9VSPO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (8 years 10 months 7 hours ago) and read 1584 times:

Quoting AsstChiefMark (Reply 22):
The only weak alcoholic is the one who doesn't admit his problem and seek treatment.

True, and it does take guts to admit it and seek help.

But Charles Kennedy is the leader of a political party and over half the party members today have said they want him to quit.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 24, posted (8 years 10 months 6 hours ago) and read 1578 times:

He's finished.

Even a number of those who have previously backed him are coming out now and going through the damning with faint praise motions.

Of course, if the Tories manage to maintain their recent resurgence, the Lib Dems are going to get horribly squeezed again, and if that does happen, a number of Lib Dems might look back in a few years and wonder how they managed to get rid of their most successful leader since Lloyd George.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
25 MKEdude : [quote=GDB,reply=11]So the Lib Dems did not do as well as expected, the 'decapitation' effort (forewarned to their opponents), against senior Tories i
26 Banco : I'm not too sure it did, really. It's what the Lib Dems themseves said they were going for, but given the way the electoral system works, I always th
27 GSM763 : As said above the electoral system doesn't help. If I remember correctly according to an article in the independent (a left leaning newspaper) if we h
28 ConcordeBoy : Yes. ....but, that does not however mean you shouldn't be lauded for (eventually) having the courage/strength/etc to retake your life from the situat
29 MEA-707 : Margaret Thatcher has been known to drink heavily during office, think of one or two bottles of whisky a night as well, which might be the reason she
30 GDB : Thatcher liked a whisky late at night, after a long day. She was a hard working, driven person, no matter what you thought of her. Kennedy supporters
31 Gary2880 : that explains alot.
32 GDB : I could not stand Maggie, but where is the proof (no pun intended). I don't call a Whiskey after work being alcoholic. The idea that a serving PM, wit
33 Banco : True enough, but it isn't quite as dramatic as that, and it's what the Lib Dems themselves say, but what they never mention is that people vote accor
34 Post contains images 9VSPO : That's it folks. He's gone.
35 Post contains images Gary2880 : Yup, just resigned ..
36 Post contains images GSM763 : Speech is now over.
37 777236ER : Why are you sad?
38 Andz : Why is Menzies Campbell referred to as "Ming"?
39 GDB : Apparently it's short for 'Menzies'. Though his failure to support Kennedy (after Charlie lied once too often about his condition and competence), had
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