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Question For Fluent Spanish Speakers  
User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1612 times:

I'm using the Barron's Mastering Spanish Level 1 based on FSI. Hopefully I can learn to speak and understand spanish fluently. I have a question that keeps bothering me. Whether you are from Mexico, Spain, Puerto Rico, or another spanish speaking country how do you pronounce your V's? This book with 12 cds based on Spanish spoken in latin america says pronounce them like a B. A lady told me it just sounds like a B because of the way it comes out when they speak. BUT, this lady I work with said we dont pronounce our V's like B's its actually sounds like a V. So which is it? For the spanish speakers out there is it pronounced both was depending on where you go?

I want to go to Spain next year and Mexico. The Spainish I'm learning isn't Castillian Spainish but more so Spainish spoken in Latin America. FSI makes references to Spains dialect at times.

One more thing, some people who a native spanish speakers have told me Puerto Ricans speak buttchered spanish. So I guess its a very different dialect then?

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDerico From Argentina, joined Dec 1999, 4313 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1594 times:

The difference in the sound of a 'v' and a 'b' is not really significant and much less to affect how people will understand you. You won't insult someone (like it may happen in English), if you slightly mispronounce a vowel.

The 'v' sound has lost a lot of strength in spoken Spanish. It depends on the country. I don't know about the countries you are going, but Argentina has different accents and pronounciations within itself beause it is a large country, many provinces have their own accent. In many the 'v' is pronounced just like a 'b', in a few others you can tell the 'v' is harder.



My internet was not shut down, the internet has shut me down
User currently offlineFutureUApilot From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1365 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1593 times:

I'm not fluent in Spanish by any means, but my teachers always pronounce the V with a B sound, but when we say it with a V sound they don't mind one bit. My first spanish phrase i learned: Quiero la camisa, por favor.

-Sam



The Pilot is the highest form of life on Earth!
User currently offlineAA777 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 2544 posts, RR: 28
Reply 3, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1586 times:

Some of it depends on the word. Some words tend to be pronounced with a V sound, others more with a B. To me, its usually somewhere in-between the two. Try it- try to cross the sound of B and V, it can be done...

for instance.... yo vivo can be said sort of like.... 'yo bibo'... BUT, its neither a hard V or a hard B sound.... confusing I know. Best thing to do is just to say the V sound and make it not too heavy- when you make a V, you bite down on your bottom lip a bit. Try to do this less, and the sound will come out more naturally.

-AA777


User currently offlinePSA727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 974 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1584 times:

I think it's the other way around.

I always hear, at least to my ear, Vs pronounced like Vs, but
Bs pronounced like Vs...and this more with Latin American Spanish
as opposed to Iberian Spanish. For example:

boca...voca
basura...vasura
batata...vatata
barrio...varrio
(in fact one local gang that calls itself Barrio Carlos Locos would always
spraypaint "VCL" all over the place. I guess they weren't in school when
spelling was being taught).

As for Puerto Ricans being hard to understand, add Venezuelans to that
list also. They speak way too rapidly for me to comprehend them. They
also tend to chop of the last syllable of longer words.



fly high, pay low...Germanwings!
User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1560 times:

Interesting! i guess ill just keep at it. my goal is fluency and nothing less! I think i am starting to get the pronunciation between b and v! i think ill just try to say something in between the two words!

User currently offlinePSA727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 974 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1554 times:

Quoting AA777 (Reply 3):
yo vivo can be said sort of like.... 'yo bibo'...

Isn't "yo bibo" "I drink" in English?

I grew up with Spanish spoken all around me by family members, and
quite honestly, the "V" being pronounced like a "B" never happened.

vaca was never pronounced baca

ventana was never pronounced bentana

vidrio was never pronounced bidrio

vapor was never pronounce bapor

valor was never pronounced balor

veneno was never pronounced beneno

and so on... and so on



fly high, pay low...Germanwings!
User currently offlineLuisde8cd From Pitcairn Islands, joined Aug 2004, 2575 posts, RR: 31
Reply 7, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1551 times:

Quoting PSA727 (Reply 4):

As for Puerto Ricans being hard to understand, add Venezuelans to that
list also. They speak way too rapidly for me to comprehend them



Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
ne more thing, some people who a native spanish speakers have told me Puerto Ricans speak buttchered spanish.

Puerto Ricans alongside Cubans and Dominicans speak Caribbean Spanish which is easily to recognize because they pronounce all R's like L's.

Please = Por Favor

Por favor in Caribbean Spanish is pronunciated: "Pol Favol"

We Venezuelans might speak fast but our Spanish ain't as bad as Puerto Rican or Caribbean spanish  Smile

Saludos desde Caracas,
Luis


User currently offlineMarambio From UK - Scotland, joined Oct 2004, 1160 posts, RR: 25
Reply 8, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1550 times:

It really depends on the accent. For instance, while in Chile most people do make a difference between B and V, in Argentina that never happens - unless you are from Mendoza, a province that shares borders with Chile.

Quoting PSA727 (Reply 6):
Isn't "yo bibo" "I drink" in English?

I drink = yo bebo
Yo vivo = I live

Saludos,
Marambio



Aerolíneas Argentinas - La Argentina que levanta vuelo.
User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1537 times:

So the question for me is how should I pronounce it to make sure people understand me when I speak!? Aside from my pronunication which I am trying to perfect, I want to make sure I'm understood and I can understand other speakers. Differenct dialects.....Maybe I will just stick with how FSI says pronounce it. Like Vaya=go would be Baya.

O and thanks for the information so far!

Gracias por la informacion!


User currently offlineAcjflyer From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 427 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1523 times:

I lived in Spain for a couple of years and one of the first things you will realize is that Spanish is spoken differently in all countries. While in Spain i learned that the 'v' is pronounced quite close to the 'b', but the trick is not to make it sound like you're a yankee. For example you don't want to say volar (fly) with a hard B sound but when you let it flow off your tounge it will come off sounding a bit like a 'b'. It will come naturally and it will sound fine.

User currently onlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12262 posts, RR: 35
Reply 11, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1480 times:
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Quoting FutureUApilot (Reply 2):
Quiero la camisa, por favor.

Now why would you learn that, and not something useful? Like "Quiero una cerveza, por favor" Big grin



“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, an
User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 1472 times:

My new book came today! I got it off Amazon 501 Spanish Verbs fully conjugated in all tenses! I'm going to study one word a day while still studying my level 1 spanish and listening to the cds! I just need not get discouraged! I hate when I forget certain things but hey I'm learning a whole new langauge.

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