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Language Names  
User currently offlineBraybuddy From India, joined Aug 2004, 5795 posts, RR: 32
Posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1429 times:

How many languages in current use have the distinction of NOT being named after the countries they are used in? Off the top of my head I can only think of a few: Farsi, Hindi, Tagalog, Romansch, Gaelic and probably a few more if it wasn't so late at night. Okay, you could probably include Mandarin and Castellano, although they would probably be considered just Chinese and Spanish by foreigners. Can anyone think of any others? I'm sure there are hundreds of regional languages (eg Breton), but I'm talking about official languages or ones in widespread use here.

[Edited 2006-05-15 01:03:30]

24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8735 posts, RR: 42
Reply 1, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1420 times:

Off the top of my head, Norway comes to mind. They have two versions of their language, one of which is called Nynorsk ("New-Norwegian", named after the country) and the other, more widely used one, is Bokmål or the "book language".


Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20791 posts, RR: 62
Reply 2, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1408 times:

All of the Athabaskan languages would fall into this category:

http://www.native-languages.org/famath.htm



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineCtbarnes From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3491 posts, RR: 50
Reply 3, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1408 times:

A lot of times these names are of languages predominantly spoken in a region rather than the whole country. India is an example of this with languages such as Hindi, Tamil, Gujarati, Bengali and so forth.

More specific to a country would be something like Urdu (Pakistan and India), or Arabic (spoken widely throughout the Middle East). Another regional (i.e. across a number of countries) language would be Swahili spoken in East Africa.

Charles, SJ



The customer isn't a moron, she is your wife -David Ogilvy
User currently offlineBraybuddy From India, joined Aug 2004, 5795 posts, RR: 32
Reply 4, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1408 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 2):
Athabaskan languages

Well you learn something new every day!


User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20791 posts, RR: 62
Reply 5, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1399 times:

And a little history on how an Athabaskan language was used:

http://thenaturalamerican.com/wind_talkers.htm

"Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Peleliu, and Iwo Jima have one thing in common: they were captured by the Wind Talkers unit. The Wind Talkers took part in every assault the U.S. Marines conducted in the Pacific from 1942 to 1945--serving in all six Marine divisions. Many American soldiers staked their lives on the success of the Navajo code and view the Wind Talkers' contributions to the war effort as nothing short of monumental. A Marine Corps signal officer summed up the situation after WW2: "Were it not for the Wind Talkers, the Marines would never have taken Iwo Jima and other places."

American Marines on Saipan were able to use one code that was never broken by the Japanese. Navajo Indian communicators spoke in a code derived from their exclusive language to help win the battle. The complexity of the code perplexed the Japanese. It proved impossible to break for many reasons. For example, there are multiple sounds for vowels used in words which are similar in spelling but have different meanings. The complexity increased on the receiving end. Once a Navajo Code Talker obtained the string of unrelated Navajo words, he translated every word into English. From the collection of English words, he used the first letter in every word to make a whole word in English. The original Navajo Code Talkers also created and learned approximately 450 words that represented military terms.



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineLO231 From Belgium, joined Sep 2004, 2392 posts, RR: 22
Reply 6, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1383 times:

Take Flemish, although considered a dialect by Dutch norms, some words and sentences would be absolutely strange to the Dutch, while widely used in Belgium..


Regards,
LO231



Got both LO 788 frames already, next LO E95 and 734 BRU-WAW-BRU
User currently offlineArcano From Chile, joined Mar 2004, 2410 posts, RR: 23
Reply 7, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1370 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
Castellano, although they would probably be considered just Chinese and Spanish by foreigners

Castellano was name after Castilla, so I think it also belongs to the category of named after the region they are spoken.

BTW, I love to call the language "Castellano" instead of the meaningless "Español" word.



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User currently offlineMarambio From UK - Scotland, joined Oct 2004, 1160 posts, RR: 25
Reply 8, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1364 times:

Swahili, which is spoken in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda.

Guaraní, official language in Paraguay and in the Argentine province of Corrientes, in both cases together with Spanish.

Saludos,
Marambio



Aerolíneas Argentinas - La Argentina que levanta vuelo.
User currently offlineJAGflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3569 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1353 times:

Hebrew which is the official langauge of Israel as well as Arabic. Urdu from Pakistan, Punjabi,Gujrati and Hindi from India. Tamil from Sri Lanka.


Support the beer and soda can industry, recycle old airplanes!
User currently offlineYOWza From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 4906 posts, RR: 15
Reply 10, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 1328 times:

Quoting JAGflyer (Reply 9):
Hindi from India

I'm not sure of the etymology of it all but I'm pretty sure there is a relation between "Hindi" and the "Hindustan" which of course is the equivalent of "India" not being Indian I'm not sure, perhaps somebody knows for sure?

Back on topic Dhivehi - Maldives and Chichewa - Malawi come to mind.

YOWza



12A whenever possible.
User currently offlineSFOMEX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 1323 times:

Spanglish.

"Te llamo para atras" y "aseguranza" are two perls of this growing language, along with "parkear", "wachame", "troca" and so on. Big grin


User currently offlineMisbeehavin From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 914 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 1321 times:

I believe Farsi came from Persia and Hindi from Hindustan and Flemish from Flanders, so those are somewhat accounted for.

Dutch, on the other hand, came from Holland / the Netherlands. So at least the English term for the language is not named after the country.

And what about Bhutan - what language do they speak? I'm quite sure it's not called Bhutanese.


User currently offlineSFOMEX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1312 times:

Quoting Misbeehavin (Reply 12):
And what about Bhutan - what language do they speak?

National or official language: Dzongkha.  chat 


User currently offlineSalso From Slovenia, joined Dec 2004, 205 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1298 times:

Well, I know in Switzerland they have four official languages. One of them being Rätoromanisch (or as far as I know in English it's called Rhetoroman). Well... the actal language spoken in Graubünden is actually Bündnerromanisch (hab ich das richtig gekriegt?). It is the least spoken of the four official languages but it is still official there. And anyway, none of the four languages is named after Switzerland (or la Suisse, die Schweiz, la Swizzera).

There was a dispute a while ago, if I remember correctly, that the Swiss version of the German language should not be considered only a "dialect" of German anymore, but an independent language, Schwyzer Dytsch, that is. So there but be at least one language named after the country itself. Is that right? Perhaps our Swiss friends can shed some light on it.

(sorry for the lengthy explanation, but I am a language freak and Switzerland is one of my favourite countries in the whole universe)


User currently offlineAsbg From Israel, joined Feb 2000, 538 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1279 times:

Hebrew is the official language of Israel.

User currently offlineBraybuddy From India, joined Aug 2004, 5795 posts, RR: 32
Reply 16, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1259 times:

Quoting Salso (Reply 14):
Well, I know in Switzerland they have four official languages. One of them being Rätoromanisch (or as far as I know in English it's called Rhetoroman).

Romansch (or Rumantsch, Romansh or Romanche) is what the language is called in English


User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 1251 times:

Afrikaans, Zulu, Tswana, Sotho, Shangaan, Ndebele, Xhosa plus a couple of others, all official languages in South Africa.

User currently offlineANother From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1244 times:

Quoting Salso (Reply 14):
Perhaps our Swiss friends can shed some light on it.

Well, if you don't mind a Canadian resident of Switzerland commenting. The French spoken here (in the 'Suisse romande') is likely to be understood by French speakers anywhere - although the accents of some from the more rural areas are likely to be commented on.

Swiss German is another matter. I think there are as many dialects as there are towns and cities, and most are not understood outside their own regions.

Still a wonderful place to live.


User currently offlineThom@s From Norway, joined Oct 2000, 11955 posts, RR: 46
Reply 19, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 1216 times:

Quoting Aloges (Reply 1):
Off the top of my head, Norway comes to mind. They have two versions of their language, one of which is called Nynorsk ("New-Norwegian", named after the country) and the other, more widely used one, is Bokmål or the "book language".

Just to add to that; Nynorsk is the new language based on norwegian dialects, while Bokmål is based on the Danish written language. They are very similar, and although quite a few words are (slightly) different, the majority of the words are the same in Nynorsk and Bokmål.

Nynorsk is mainly the written language in South western Norway, while Bokmål is mainly used in the South east, and north.

Thom@s



"If guns don't kill people, people kill people - does that mean toasters don't toast toast, toast toast toast?"
User currently offlineChristeljs From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 533 posts, RR: 4
Reply 20, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1203 times:

Quoting Aloges (Reply 1):
Off the top of my head, Norway comes to mind. They have two versions of their language, one of which is called Nynorsk ("New-Norwegian", named after the country) and the other, more widely used one, is Bokmål or the "book language".

They're not really two different languages though. It's only some words slightly written different, and it sounds like two different dialects just. Me personally wouldn't call it two different languages.



Christel Sinsen Photography
User currently offlineBCNGRO From Andorra, joined Oct 2004, 584 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1199 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
Okay, you could probably include Mandarin and Castellano, although they would probably be considered just Chinese and Spanish by foreigners.

Actually, "castellano" is a language named after the place where it is and has been used for hundreds of years (Castille). Funnily enough, "spanish" isn't such a language: It is named after "Spain", but there are regions where spanish wasn't used until just a couple of centuries ago...



At the bus station, buses stop. At the train station, trains stop. At my desk, I have a work station.
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12264 posts, RR: 35
Reply 22, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1156 times:
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Quoting Aloges (Reply 1):
Off the top of my head, Norway comes to mind. They have two versions of their language, one of which is called Nynorsk ("New-Norwegian", named after the country) and the other, more widely used one, is Bokmål or the "book language".

Thom@s summed this up, but I'd say nynorsk is used mostly in Telemark (inner areas), most of the west coast from Egersund north to Mørekysten, and random areas inbetween. Bokmål is not spoken by anybody (some older ladies from Majorstuen possibly..hehe), but eastern dialects are based off of bokmål.

One not mentioned here is Sami, spoken by the Sami people in the northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. It is not related to Norwegian, as a matter of fact it is not even a Germanic language, but rather Uralic language. Northern Sami is considered an official language in some municipalities in Norway, and is protected by the Norwegian Constitution.

Quoting Christeljs (Reply 20):
They're not really two different languages though. It's only some words slightly written different, and it sounds like two different dialects just. Me personally wouldn't call it two different languages.

Then why do I have to take classes in it? Grr...  Smile



“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, an
User currently offlineAndaman From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1136 times:

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 22):
One not mentioned here is Sami, spoken by the Sami people in the northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. It is not related to Norwegian, as a matter of fact it is not even a Germanic language, but rather Uralic language. Northern Sami is

Sami language belongs to the same language family (Finno-Ugric) with Finnish and has an official status in Finland too. It sounds sort of familiar to a Finnish speaker but I can't really understand it.

To the original topic: Swedish is the second official language in Finland, that comes from the time Finland was the eastern part of the Swedish kingdom for 600y.
At school all Finnish speakers have to learn at least some Swedish and all Swedish speaking Finns some Finnish.


User currently offlineCarmenlu15 From Guatemala, joined Dec 2004, 4763 posts, RR: 30
Reply 24, posted (8 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1124 times:

We could consider any of the Mayan languages spoken here (kaqchikel, kekchi, mam, etc.), since they are recognized as official languages in Guatemala.

Quoting SFOMEX (Reply 11):
"Te llamo para atras" y "aseguranza" are two perls of this growing language, along with "parkear", "wachame", "troca" and so on.

 faint 



Don't expect to see me around that much (if at all) -- the contact link should still work, though.
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