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A Reason Few "Good Stories" Come Out Of Iraq?  
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20394 posts, RR: 62
Posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 2209 times:

Some salient points on why there may not be more favorable stories on what's happening in Iraq, from a report in the Washington Post. The entire article is interesting on what some of the journalists are up against over there.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...le/2006/05/22/AR2006052201386.html

The Voice of America's bureau in Baghdad has been closed for the past six months, ever since the government-funded agency withdrew its only reporter in Iraq after she was fired upon in an ambush and her security guard was later killed.

All Western news organizations have struggled with the dangerous conditions in Iraq, which have led to such high-profile incidents as the kidnapping of Christian Science Monitor reporter Jill Carroll and the wounding of ABC News anchor Bob Woodruff. But for a federally funded information service to pull out of Baghdad for such a prolonged period raises questions about the Bush administration's insistence that conditions there are gradually improving.

VOA reporter Alisha Ryu said yesterday that she told her bosses in December that "it would really be impossible for me to do any kind of work" in Iraq. "I couldn't live with the idea that someone else could have died who was working with me. . . . For all journalists, it's really become impossible to move around."

Asked why VOA has not sent another reporter to Iraq, Ryu said, "They didn't have any volunteers to replace me."



International Homo of Mystery
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3829 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 2198 times:

From Countdown on MSNBC yesterday:

"...the idea that the American media is ignoring positive stories in Iraq, colliding headfirst with the reality that the government-sponsored media can‘t even get anybody to go to Iraq.

....this seems to be an administration that is outwardly unsusceptible to irony or charges of hypocrisy...While the Bush press office and responsive reporters and talk show hosts desperately continue to accuse the, quote, “mainstream media” of ignoring the, quote, “good news from Iraq,” “The Washington Post” has revealed that for the last six months, the Voice of America, the U.S. government-run news organization, has not had a correspondent in Baghdad because it‘s just too dangerous."


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12954027/



Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineBushpilot From South Africa, joined Jul 2007, 0 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 2191 times:

Here is how I like to look at the reporting and if the stories coming out are more bad than good news. Firstly, I am against the war in principle. I respect the job the troops have done, I think by and large they have done a good job, have acted professionally, and in many cases heroically, despite being put in a very difficult position by the leaders of this country who shouldnt have put them there in the first place.
But many of the heroic acts go under reported, and the good humanitarian work as well, but there are some very serious problems with leadership in DC, that is what has caused a continuation and escalation of this conflict. Surely the troops deserve more credit, but the big news outlets are right to report on the failings of policy that is going on over there.


User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20394 posts, RR: 62
Reply 3, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 2189 times:

Quoting Bushpilot (Reply 2):
But many of the heroic acts go under reported, and the good humanitarian work as well

This is part of my quandry. I don't think any of us want to see things go badly over there, but there are stories that do come out, just not in great volumes.

Without getting this into a thread of people lining up do endorse the war or not (there are many other places to do that), my inquiring mind wants to piece together the puzzle of how stories of any stripe get out and into the mainstream.

Obviously not having the VOA embedded in the country, for whatever reason, seems to me to be part of the problem.



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 31
Reply 4, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2147 times:

Quoting Bushpilot (Reply 2):

Very well said. I agree with you on all points. My friends Step-dad was there for a year and i was over visiting and he showed me the pictures from Iraq and told me stories, he described convoy duty, which was what his unit was assigned. They lost 0 troops and had only 2 close calls.

But what he also showed me made me feel better about what our troops are doing. His unit rebuilt a school, in a small village that sadams goonies trashed and ruined. This town now also has electric power and running CLEAN water. He showed me pictures of smiling adults and children sitting with the men of his unit, as well as them doing some Christmas stuff with the kids. It made me proud to know that the average citizen wants us and that we are really helping those people out.



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2134 times:

Quoting Bushpilot (Reply 2):
But many of the heroic acts go under reported, and the good humanitarian work as well

And I've been beating this subject into the dirt forever.

Ask our friend STLGph, who will immediately tell you, it's not news. He and I had a fairly heated discussion, this subject, several weeks ago.

Simply put, the American news media simply doesn't give a shit if it's not blood and gore and dead people.

I place the blame for this "oversight" squarely and solidly on the Media. Not on our government idiots in the DoD, not on the troops, not on the Iraqi's, not on anyone except the media, period.


User currently offlineJaysit From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2125 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 5):
Simply put, the American news media simply doesn't give a shit if it's not blood and gore and dead people.

Well, you don't report the fact that 40,000 flights took off without a problem on any particular day. You would report that one flight that unfortunately crashed killing hundreds.

The premise (and conceit) here is that we're supposed to be keeping the peace, bringing democracy to Iraq, and preventing terrorist attacks. Much like the way the aviation industry puts planes up in the air and brings them down safely. Thats the understood job in both cases.

Its only when that job goes horribly wrong that it makes the news.

And given that our "job" is to bring the peace, its when that job is marred by daily deaths, murders, car bombings, torture, rape and mayhem that news is made. After all, one didn't report that Saddam Hussein didn't kill 30 million people, only that he killed 1 million. Saddam could argue that the press only harped on the 1 million he bumped off, not the 30 million who were happily eating kebabs and drinking mint tea.


User currently offlineBushpilot From South Africa, joined Jul 2007, 0 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2123 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 5):
I place the blame for this "oversight" squarely and solidly on the Media. Not on our government idiots in the DoD, not on the troops, not on the Iraqi's, not on anyone except the media, period.

I agree to a point, and you and I have both discussed this issue before, and with the same conclusion. Just to back the media a bit here, although I do place blame because they control what we see and hear about. I would rather it be that way than to have the government tell us what is going on. I also think the media is focusing on the big picture, and the fact that a school was built in a small town is a good thing, but does that overshadow revenge killings among ethnic groups...I say not.
But for me it is also what one reads or listens to, I do my best to read as much as is available, and I also dont have cable so dont get to see and would rather not listen to all the pundits spinning thier side on Fox or CNN. But I check out thier websites, as well as Al jazeera, and I am a dedicated reader of Soldier of Fortune. Last months issue featured a piece on a sniper who whacked a bad guy at 1300+ yards with a .308! CNN didnt report that.
The media could do a better job in giving a balanced report. But at the same time, we drive to and from work everyday, if it goes to plan, nobody cares, but if you roll it over, might make the news.


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2117 times:

Quoting Bushpilot (Reply 7):
But at the same time, we drive to and from work everyday, if it goes to plan, nobody cares, but if you roll it over, might make the news.

Would you not suggest that if we build a school, repave a road, repair a water supply, that this goes to the plan of keeping the peace and if the people in this country could see this perhaps their uber-negative feelings (some - most - caused by the ridiculous news media reports of nothing but negative) might shift - or balance?

Quoting Jaysit (Reply 6):
Well, you don't report the fact that 40,000 flights took off without a problem on any particular day.

Same question applies, Jaysit.


User currently offlineGilligan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2117 times:

Quoting Jaysit (Reply 6):
And given that our "job" is to bring the peace, its when that job is marred by daily deaths, murders, car bombings, torture, rape and mayhem that news is made.

But when that news is blown all out of proportion to reality then it is like saying that flying in any airplane on any day is taking a serious risk which we all know not to be true from experience. The general public does not have any experience in Iraq and has to depend on the news media for reports, which when biased towards violence color everyone's perception as nothing is going right.


User currently offline11Bravo From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1717 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2104 times:

Quoting Gilligan (Reply 9):
But when that news is blown all out of proportion to reality then it is like saying that flying in any airplane on any day is taking a serious risk which we all know not to be true from experience.

..., and how exactly do you know what that "Reality" is? What sources provide you with the information and insight to determine that conditions and events are something other than those represented in the media?



WhaleJets Rule!
User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3829 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2096 times:

I have an idea. Go to Baghdad, wrap yourself in Old Glory and walk out of the Green Zone. Let us know what happened on an Al-Zarqawi video.  Wink


Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineGilligan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 2084 times:

Quoting 11Bravo (Reply 10):
What sources provide you with the information and insight to determine that conditions and events are something other than those represented in the media?



You mean like the one below?

Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 4):
My friends Step-dad was there for a year and i was over visiting and he showed me the pictures from Iraq and told me stories, he described convoy duty, which was what his unit was assigned. They lost 0 troops and had only 2 close calls.

But what he also showed me made me feel better about what our troops are doing. His unit rebuilt a school, in a small village that sadams goonies trashed and ruined. This town now also has electric power and running CLEAN water. He showed me pictures of smiling adults and children sitting with the men of his unit, as well as them doing some Christmas stuff with the kids. It made me proud to know that the average citizen wants us and that we are really helping those people out.

Unfortunately all we have is the personel stories that the servicemen and women bring back along with their pictures since the official news media in this country is uninterested in telling those stories.


User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 2077 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Thread starter):
VOA reporter Alisha Ryu said yesterday that she told her bosses in December that "it would really be impossible for me to do any kind of work" in Iraq. "I couldn't live with the idea that someone else could have died who was working with me. . . . For all journalists, it's really become impossible to move around."

Whatever happened to the generation of reporters who were willing to go into combat with the frontline troops? There were reporters who disembarked on D-Day on Omaha Beach during the first wave, some of whom were killed.


User currently offlineBushpilot From South Africa, joined Jul 2007, 0 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2042 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 8):
Would you not suggest that if we build a school, repave a road, repair a water supply, that this goes to the plan of keeping the peace and if the people in this country could see this perhaps their uber-negative feelings (some - most - caused by the ridiculous news media reports of nothing but negative) might shift - or balance?

I agree, but will add to this a bit, I think it is good we have our seabees out there busting thier asses to get the job done, but what is causing continued animosity and hatred towards American troops is the fact that Iraqi men have little job opportunities except joining the security forces, and as we all know that is dangerous, and I wouldnt want to join up then be sent into arrest my own people for fighting what many consider an enemy. What we need to do is give them real jobs, truck drivers, masons, carpenters, etc. Right now they see US soldiers and Haliburton employees doing this and they are without a job. We sit here and bitch in this country about illegal mexicans coming here, and most will agree they take jobs most Americans wont. But imagine if it was illegals doing less menial work, and here is the kicker, getting paid 4 or 5x the amount an American would for doing the same job. That would cause some serious problems here.

Quoting Gilligan (Reply 12):
Unfortunately all we have is the personel stories that the servicemen and women bring back along with their pictures since the official news media in this country is uninterested in telling those stories.

Well I think lots of them are being told, but on the local level, the anchorage daily news has a feature called voices from Iraq and tells the soldiers side of the story, my point to this is, that they are being highly under reported by the main news outlet, who in most cases have turned not to reporting news, but opinion. I see it any time I watch cable news, News story A. takes 2minutes to report, now here is "expert" Z to talk for 10 minutes to influence our opinions on the matter.

Quoting Cfalk (Reply 13):
Whatever happened to the generation of reporters who were willing to go into combat with the frontline troops? There were reporters who disembarked on D-Day on Omaha Beach during the first wave, some of whom were killed.

Just a few things to add, I am of the generation that is fighting over there right now, and I probably would be there as well were it not for a serious knee injury at 17. Plenty of members of other generations have called us lazy, spoiled, and cynical, and to a point as a generation we are, but despite me being against this war, the soldiers are doing thier job, and doing it just as heroicly as any other generation, and they are all, every single one of them, volunteers unlike past wars. Now the media on the other hand, I can understand thier apprehension about going into harms way, but there are those out there who do. The gal in question Ryu, she is a non-combatant, had her body guard killed, has seen and heard of other journalists taken hostage and terrible things happen to them, she has seen the shit, and has decided to not take the risks any more. I think the fact this is the reporting agency of the US government says there are some huge policy failings over there.


User currently offlineJaysit From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (8 years 2 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 2011 times:

Here's some more good news.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4915172.stm

Good news, if you're Fred Phelps.

If you folks are so disappointed at reality, then go to Baghdad and take pictures of all the great stuff happening there. Then come back and post it on here, as well as the details of the inflight meal you enjoyed on the way there.

Quoting Cfalk (Reply 13):
Whatever happened to the generation of reporters who were willing to go into combat with the frontline troops? There were reporters who disembarked on D-Day on Omaha Beach during the first wave, some of whom were killed.

How do you think we're getting any news from Iraq at all? 69 journalists have been killed while on the job in Iraq since the war began. What do you want? More deaths.

I have a great idea. Lets send Rush Limbaugh, his friends at Fox News, and Bob Novak to Iraq where they can report on all the wonderful stuff that is going on there. Frankly, I'd pay good money to watch Rush Limbaugh broadcasting from a Cafe in Fallujah about all the freedoms Iraqis enjoy. Sans an entire Infantry Division of course. And since you people trust him so very much, you'll get your high quality reporting from the ass's mouth itself.


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