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Question On MBAs  
User currently offlineAirwave From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 1117 posts, RR: 3
Posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1115 times:

This is an odd question, but I really haven't been able to find a decent answer elsewhere, so I'm hoping someone on here can clarify things for me.

Is a degree in business administration or something like it (management, economics, &c) required to get into an MBA program? Right now, I'm a business major, but I'm bored out of my mind in the classes, even though I love business and have experience with it. Point is, I was thinking of changing my major to something much more interesting...but I'd still like to get that MBA, if possible. So what's the deal here? Any info is greatly appreciated. Thanks all!


Airwave  eyebrow 


When you do things right, people won't be sure you've done anything at all.
8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJoseMEX From Mexico, joined Oct 1999, 1539 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1111 times:

AFAIK (and speaking from my personal experience) it is not necessary. I got my MBA 5 years ago and there were engineers, lawyers, 2 philosophers, one doctor and one biologist (among others) in my group.

I don't know if it's different depending on the country or school.


User currently offlineN174UA From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 994 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1111 times:

Airwave,

Short answer is no. In fact, it adds to the diversity of the school's program to have students of different academic backgrounds coming in. I'm in the Albers graduate school of business at Seattle University right now, and we have students who had math, engineering, liberal arts, and other non-business degrees. In class discussions, it may add to the quality of the conversation in that there are different perspectives.

One advantage, depending on the school, is by having a business background, you will be able to waive some classes in the "fundamental" group of classes, whereas someone who has a degree in Russian architecture will be starting from the very beginning.

Ultimately, it's up to you...but remember, the classes in the MBA program will be at a quicker pace and go into more detail. If you can get exposure to the material now, then you'll be that much better off in the MBA program once you get there.

Hope that helps..  Wink


User currently offlineGeorgetown From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 239 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1100 times:
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Airwave,

N174UA's response was right on the money. While you might be slightly ahead of the curve with an undergrad business education, you are at virtually no disadvantage by being another major. I was a government major as an undergrad and now am an investment banker. The point is, do what interests you, because you really never know where you're going to end up! The most important factor is that you get good grades; which is far more likely if you're doing something you enjoy.

If you want my advise, your best bet to get into a top-flight MBA program besides grades is what you do after college. The summer after your junior year you really should to do your best to land a good business internship which you can hopefully parlay into a full-time offer for after you graduate. Work for two or three years and then go get that MBA - mind you, the real "MBA" is earned those two or three years after college when you're working 110 hours a week, after which you might very well decide to take another career path. Take this stuff one step at a time. It's good to see you're planning ahead, but pay attention to the road directly in front of you!

In the meantime... ENJOY EVERY MINUTE OF COLLEGE THAT YOU CAN!!! Work hard and play hard, and make sure you're doing what interests you. If you're doing what you love to do, success will follow. Best of luck!



Let's go Hoyas!
User currently offlineAirCop From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1088 times:

Quoting Georgetown (Reply 3):

N174UA's response was right on the money



Quoting Georgetown (Reply 3):
In the meantime... ENJOY EVERY MINUTE OF COLLEGE THAT YOU CAN!!!



Quoting N174UA (Reply 2):
t adds to the diversity of the school's program to have students of different academic

True for most any masters program. Business bored me also so I went into law enforcement, and ended up with a masters in education. Believe me, the instructors enjoyed having me in the course to offer a different viewpoint on issues.  bouncy 


User currently offlineN174UA From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 994 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1081 times:

Quoting Georgetown (Reply 3):
If you want my advise, your best bet to get into a top-flight MBA program

Absolutely...and if you can't get into the top 25, make sure you attend an institution that is AACSB (nationally) accredited. I believe only about 25% of b-schools fit this accreditation (Ivy league included of course) as there are stringent requirements for schools to earn and then maintain it. Please, whatever you do...don't go to Univ. of Phoenix or some online place that offers an MBA. Besides the coursework, the networking opportunities you can develop in b-school are potentially priceless.

One other thought, and this motivated me to switch to our Master of Int'l. Business program...perhaps get a specfic graduate degree in the area of your interest. For example, Master in Finance, or Accounting, or In'tl. Business, etc. It will help set you apart somewhat, and if there's 100 MBA's applying, but you have something more focused, that just may make all the difference for you.

Anyway...time to study for my Macroeconomics and Business Strategy finals next week...  Wink


User currently offlineAirCop From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1075 times:

Quoting N174UA (Reply 5):
.don't go to Univ. of Phoenix or some online place that offers an MBA.

 checkmark  Agreed 100%. The know of several individuals that has enrolled in the MBA program offered by University of Phoenix, and has been disappointed in the quaility, and the lack of doors that were opened by the degree. Compared to the American Graduate of International Management (Thunderbird in Glendale AZ), most of those students had high paying positions all around the globe before they graduated. [My wife ran the student health center there for a couple of years]

Oh by the way, welcome back N174UA.


User currently offlineAirwave From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 1117 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1063 times:

Thanks for all the help, everybody. *Whew* Now I can breathe a sigh of relief and dig back into the college viewbooks and transfer information, lol.  Yeah sure

Quoting N174UA (Reply 2):
Ultimately, it's up to you...but remember, the classes in the MBA program will be at a quicker pace and go into more detail. If you can get exposure to the material now, then you'll be that much better off in the MBA program once you get there.

Good point, that's something I didn't realize. I'm guessing something like a minor in business would be a very good idea?

Quoting Georgetown (Reply 3):
The most important factor is that you get good grades; which is far more likely if you're doing something you enjoy.

Soooo true. Most of my classes the first two years were very general and some of my grades tanked. But once I got into a few courses (Contract Law comes to mind...), man, I was a much happier individual, lol.

Quoting Georgetown (Reply 3):
Work for two or three years and then go get that MBA - mind you, the real "MBA" is earned those two or three years after college when you're working 110 hours a week

Another excellent point!

Quoting Georgetown (Reply 3):
It's good to see you're planning ahead, but pay attention to the road directly in front of you!

Haha, thanks, I'm trying. You know cost/benefit ratios? I see most of my options over the next five years in terms of that these days, lol.

Quoting Georgetown (Reply 3):
Best of luck!

Thanks!  biggrin 

Quoting N174UA (Reply 5):
Please, whatever you do...don't go to Univ. of Phoenix or some online place that offers an MBA.

No worries on that point; it's a traditional brick-and-mortar place for me.

Quoting N174UA (Reply 5):
One other thought, and this motivated me to switch to our Master of Int'l. Business program...perhaps get a specfic graduate degree in the area of your interest. For example, Master in Finance, or Accounting, or In'tl. Business, etc. It will help set you apart somewhat, and if there's 100 MBA's applying, but you have something more focused, that just may make all the difference for you.

I never realized that was possible--definitely will have to look into that down the road. Thanks!!

Thanks again for all the replies; I feel a lot better now.  biggrin 


Airwave  eyebrow 



When you do things right, people won't be sure you've done anything at all.
User currently offlineN174UA From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 994 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (8 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1060 times:

Quoting AirCop (Reply 6):
Oh by the way, welcome back N174UA.

Thanks!  biggrin 

Quoting Airwave (Reply 7):
I'm guessing something like a minor in business would be a very good idea?

Sure...as long as you get exposure to the basics: microeconomics (indiv./firm/industry), macroeconomics (overall economy in aggregate), accounting, and finance. Don't worry about the marketing and operations for now. If you can get the basics down and feel comfortable, then once you're in the MBA program, you can take that initial level of understanding and build upon it. Better to have the basics down than trying to have to learn it in a crunch. Most b-schools require you to maintain a 3.0 and above, so you don't want to struggle to learn the basics if you can avoid it.

Quoting Georgetown (Reply 3):
Work for two or three years and then go get that MBA -

Couldn't agree more. I finished my undergrad. when I was 22, and started grad. school at 32. I feel like I have an advantage over those who went right from undergrad. to grad., in that I have work experiences (good and bad) that I can think of as I'm learning the subject matter, and share those experiences in class discussions. Even 2-3 years of work experience is ideal.


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