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If The UK Doesn't Go With The Euro  
User currently offline53Sqdn From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2737 times:

It will be all doom and gloom. This was the message being bored into our brains not so long ago. Hmmmmm!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6047546.stm

Nice to see they were 'nearly' right with their speculation.

69 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBHXFAOTIPYYC From Portugal, joined Jun 2005, 1644 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2718 times:

Oh you'll be flamed by the euro fanatics on this site for that one!

As far as I can see, the euro is a dead issue in the UK, and no-one is politically suicidal enough to bring it up again.

The latest 10 new EU states you'll note do not have the option not to join the euro, they're all on a countdown to it whether they like it or not.

Anytime they want to bring back the Escudo I'd be quite happy, and then we can regain some control of our economy. Until then.....



Breakfast in BHX, lunch in FAO, dinner in TIP, baggage in YYC.
User currently offline53Sqdn From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2696 times:

Quoting BHXFAOTIPYYC (Reply 1):
Oh you'll be flamed by the euro fanatics on this site for that one!

As far as I can see, the euro is a dead issue in the UK, and no-one is politically suicidal enough to bring it up again.

The latest 10 new EU states you'll note do not have the option not to join the euro, they're all on a countdown to it whether they like it or not.

Anytime they want to bring back the Escudo I'd be quite happy, and then we can regain some control of our economy. Until then.....

They (whoever) can flame me all they want
 Silly

I much preferred (when travelling) an individual Countries monetary value than this septic Euro. Must admit though, never spent a Escudo in my life. Given the chance though.....  bigthumbsup 


User currently offlineEric From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2696 times:

The problem is that as it stands the Euro does not count for much - you have the fiscal requirements that some member states can't keep too yet they were not penalised.

The Euro and the ECB does in many ways not count for much as long as all financial requirements are not met. One does not have to look much further than Scandinavia and the UK to see that not being a part of the Euro does not mean the end of the economy.

Just my opinion.


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21486 posts, RR: 53
Reply 4, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2670 times:

Suits me fine - we can talk again after the real estate bubble in Britain has finally popped...!  mischievous 

It's very much a double-edged sword to go it alone...


User currently offlineIFEMaster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2662 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 4):
It's very much a double-edged sword to go it alone...

It's worked for many countries for many hundreds of years. I think the 'Euro' side of that sword might be a bit blunt.


User currently offlineRobertNL070 From Netherlands, joined Sep 2003, 4532 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2662 times:

Quoting 53Sqdn (Thread starter):

Besides the FTSE 100, the Amsterdam AEX index rose to a four-year high this week. The Dow Jones Index is up too. Having had a set-back in the summer, the Frankfurt DAX is also riding high. I don't understand your logic. This has little to do with currency and more to do with general optimism.

Robert  bouncy 



Youth is a gift of nature. Age is a work of art.
User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5758 posts, RR: 32
Reply 7, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2648 times:

Quoting 53Sqdn (Thread starter):
It will be all doom and gloom. This was the message being bored into our brains not so long ago. Hmmmmm

And, of course, it was all doom and gloom for the euro too. It was supposed to result in huge unemployment in high inflation countries; last no longer than ten years (we're nearly eight into it now); it was a basket case when it went down to around 80 US cent, and, of course, the eurozone was pricing itself out of world markets when it went up to $1.33.

So what's gone wrong?


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21486 posts, RR: 53
Reply 8, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2644 times:

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 5):
It's worked for many countries for many hundreds of years. I think the 'Euro' side of that sword might be a bit blunt.

You were staying out of the common currency for several hundred years although it didn't even exist before a few years ago?

I see...! Big grin


User currently offlineA340600 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2003, 4105 posts, RR: 51
Reply 9, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2644 times:

Keep the £££! Realistically it's pretty much accepted that more of us in this country don't want the damn euro so I doubt it will really be much of an issue


Despite the name I am a Boeing man through and through!
User currently offlineIFEMaster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2637 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 8):
You were staying out of the common currency for several hundred years although it didn't even exist before a few years ago?

I see...!

Ha!  laughing  No, what I meant was that before the Euro, everyone was "going it alone". A single currency has hardly been the economic force that it was touted and predicted to be, so I would say that it's best to stick with what HAS worked for many hundreds of years - the Great British Pound Sterling  biggrin 


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21486 posts, RR: 53
Reply 11, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2629 times:

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 10):
No, what I meant was that before the Euro, everyone was "going it alone".

And because of the experiences made with that, we introduced the €uro. Simple as that.

People learn. Some do, anyway.

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 10):
I would say that it's best to stick with what HAS worked for many hundreds of years - the Great British Pound Sterling

Yup. We should all have stuck to paper mail and sailing ships, too... All those new things are so confusing...!  crazy 


User currently offlineIFEMaster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2615 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 11):
Yup. We should all have stuck to paper mail and sailing ships

At least they are still around and weren't abolished in the name of email and airplanes  Smile

Besides, Klaus, were you not proud of the Deutsche Mark?


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21486 posts, RR: 53
Reply 13, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2596 times:

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 12):
At least they are still around and weren't abolished in the name of email and airplanes

Same as old Mark notes and coins: Sporadically and with little practical use...

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 12):
Besides, Klaus, were you not proud of the Deutsche Mark?

"Proud"? Wouldn't say that.
The €uro signifies more than just our smaller community of this country - it signifies the will of the peoples of this continent to make the future something new, not a mere continuation and repetition of the past.

And unless you've got updated plans for a new empire somewhere, you'll need to freshen up your own perspectives just as well! "We're not europeans" might be a neat slogan, but as a constructive idea of who you actually are it's a bit weak, don't you think?  mischievous 


User currently offlineIFEMaster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2588 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 13):
The €uro signifies more than just our smaller community of this country - it signifies the will of the peoples of this continent to make the future something new, not a mere continuation and repetition of the past.

And unless you've got updated plans for a new empire somewhere, you'll need to freshen up your own perspectives just as well! "We're not europeans" might be a neat slogan, but as a constructive idea of who you actually are it's a bit weak, don't you think?

That's an interesting perspective, seeing as the Euro has for all intents and purposes failed at the remit that was initially planned for it.

I don't know that empires, perspectives, and slogans have anything to do with it. The fact still remains that the Euro would be a disaster for the UK right now, and there is nothing to signify that anything will change in the near future.

Also, I certainly haven't seen or heard any Brits using the slogan "We're not Europeans" as 'a constructive idea' of who they are, as you put it, but rather as simple defiance of who they are NOT. I don't regard myself as European, but I certainly don't identify myself that way. I'm English and proud of it. I'm also American now and proud of it. To say "I'm Not European" would carry no more weight in my identity than me saying "I'm not Chinese, I'm not German, I'm not Nigerian" or any other country. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding your point, but I don't quite see what one has to do with the other.


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21486 posts, RR: 53
Reply 15, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2578 times:

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 14):
That's an interesting perspective, seeing as the Euro has for all intents and purposes failed at the remit that was initially planned for it.

Not in the least. It is a stable currency which is on its way to becoming a major reserve currency next to the US$ and which has in fact helped bring about significant simplifications in intra-european trade of goods and services.

Its primary objectives have indeed been accomplished.

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 14):
Also, I certainly haven't seen or heard any Brits using the slogan "We're not Europeans" as 'a constructive idea' of who they are, as you put it, but rather as simple defiance of who they are NOT.

Which is exactly what I said: It is not a constructive concept of who you actually are!

You know, relative to the bizarrely distorted and delusional idea of what Europe was allegedly about, pretty much every continental european could join in as well, claiming not to be a part of what you believe Europe to be.

"Unfortunately", Britain is a part of Europe, and britons are europeans by heritage, by culture and economically.

You're like everybody else around here - you're distinctly individual (just like everybody else Big grin ), but you're still part of the family at the same time!


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 16, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2562 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 13):
it signifies the will of the peoples of this continent to make the future something new, not a mere continuation and repetition of the past.

Interesting on several levels that. Firstly, it most certainly wasn't the "will" of the peoples, since the only countries t have ever been given a referendum on the currency have rejected it. Your own country was, in opinion polls, opposed to joining. Given that, one can only assume that your "will of the people" is comparable to the same "will of the people" exercised by Democratic Republics around the world. It was the plan of the political elites, not the people.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 15):
Which is exactly what I said: It is not a constructive concept of who you actually are!

Once again, you dare to speak on behalf of others. It's the same every time this subject crops up; Klaus knows best, anyone who dares to disagree is a reactionary.

Although I do concur that the current level of the stock market is completely irrelevant in any discussion on the Euro (except inasmuch as it does show Britain continues to perform well economically), Britain has sound economic reasons for wishing to stay outside the Eurozone, ones that I have gone over on many an occasion.

The political element is a separate matter, but I would much prefer that hard-headed economic analysis, that indicates that Britain is better off outside the Eurozone, to this woolly-minded, emotional belief in a "project" as so perfectly encapsulated by Klaus.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21486 posts, RR: 53
Reply 17, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2548 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 16):
Interesting on several levels that. Firstly, it most certainly wasn't the "will" of the peoples, since the only countries t have ever been given a referendum on the currency have rejected it.

Point missed #1: You'll find that europeans do overwhelmingly appreciate that Europe today is not what it was in the past.

Individual policies - especially whenever they bring almost any kind of change with them - are very often opposed, even if they are in fact beneficial in the longer term.

But the strategic changes which have been made do make a lot of sense, and most people do realize that.

For me, that development is expressed in the €uro, among other things.

Quoting Banco (Reply 16):
Once again, you dare to speak on behalf of others. It's the same every time this subject crops up; Klaus knows best, anyone who dares to disagree is a reactionary.

Point missed #2: Could you then please be so kind as to point out where exactly the constructive concept of what Britain actually is was in fact contained in the claim "We are not europeans!"

Try as I may, it still seems to elude me...!  mischievous 


User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5727 posts, RR: 19
Reply 18, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 2512 times:

Quoting BHXFAOTIPYYC (Reply 1):
The latest 10 new EU states you'll note do not have the option not to join the euro, they're all on a countdown to it whether they like it or not.

Hey, there is still the option to fail to comply with the "Maastricht criteria" (budget deficit less than 3.6% GDP)!
Elect a left-wing government which by definition loves to spend more than they earn and you're on the best track. Look at Hungary, their deficit hovers around 10% (their PM at least had the guts to admit lying about it), we've had 8 years of soc-dems and with 2007 budget we're set to fail the criteria as well (our ex-PM still chooses to live in denial). Therefore it seems that until 2010-2012 EURO ius out of the question.

[Edited 2006-10-14 06:00:43]

User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 19, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2471 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 17):
Point missed #1: You'll find that europeans do overwhelmingly appreciate that Europe today is not what it was in the past.

Of course. And? This belief that because Europe is not at war we should all bow down and kiss the feet of the EU is ludicrous. On the same basis perhaps you should offer your undying gratitude on a daily basis to the United States as well?

Quoting Klaus (Reply 17):
Individual policies - especially whenever they bring almost any kind of change with them - are very often opposed, even if they are in fact beneficial in the longer term.

But the strategic changes which have been made do make a lot of sense, and most people do realize that.

For me, that development is expressed in the €uro, among other things.

That is just rubbish, a justification for the fact that European governments rode roughshod over the opinions of their people. Call me old fashioned, but I prefer democracy, and governments in a democracy should NEVER have bounced the people into the Euro in the teeth of public opposition.

If the people want it, fine. They didn't, and in the UK they don't. And herein lies your biggest problem; you whinge constantly about the British not wanting your precious, beloved Euro. You moan that they're reactionary, old fashioned, stubborn - all those yet again emotional terms you love to employ, but the fact is that they don't. You never put any arguments forward in favour of why except for your glorious European project for the greater benefit of mankind, and how it'll mean the end of the world if we don't.

When the economic drawbacks (Good God, drawbacks? How can such a thing be in your perfect Utopia?) are pointed out, you ignore it again, and talk about the wonders of the God-given EU.

You've lost the argument in Britain. You might yet win it in future, but unless you ever come up with cogent, logical arguments, instead of "How could you, you meanies", and "you're all doomed" you never will.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 17):
Point missed #2: Could you then please be so kind as to point out where exactly the constructive concept of what Britain actually is was in fact contained in the claim "We are not europeans!"

It's an opinion, and a valid one, though I might not agree with it. But you don't like it. Britain, like it or not, is different economically, culturally and politically from the rest of Europe. It trades globally, it's culture is global to a degree utterly unmatched in the rest of Europe. When we talk about trade, Britain is the largest single investor in the United States, and intra-European trade involving us is lower than with any other European country.

Europe is critically important to the UK, obviously and clearly. But Britain now and always, looks beyond Europe to a much greater level that any other EU member. Now, I could go on about why this impacts on any decision about the Euro, but there's little point, because all you'll do is ignore and start talking about the glories of Brussels, as usual.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2430 times:

Quoting 53Sqdn (Reply 2):
I much preferred (when travelling) an individual Countries monetary value than this septic Euro. Must admit though, never spent a Escudo in my life. Given the chance though.....

Why ? What possible difference could it make except be slightly less convenient - having to change money every time you crossed a border. Apart from that, it's just bits of paper.

Quoting BHXFAOTIPYYC (Reply 1):
Anytime they want to bring back the Escudo I'd be quite happy, and then we can regain some control of our economy. Until then.....

Mmmm yes, the Portuguese economy was a miracle of abundance IIRC !  Smile

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 10):
No, what I meant was that before the Euro, everyone was "going it alone". A single currency has hardly been the economic force that it was touted and predicted to be, so I would say that it's best to stick with what HAS worked for many hundreds of years - the Great British Pound Sterling



Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 12):
Besides, Klaus, were you not proud of the Deutsche Mark?

What's to be "proud of" in a currency. It's money, if you have it, great, if you don't, get a job. It's a means to a end, a tool. It's like being proud of a spanner.

Quoting Banco (Reply 16):
Interesting on several levels that. Firstly, it most certainly wasn't the "will" of the peoples, since the only countries t have ever been given a referendum on the currency have rejected it. Your own country was, in opinion polls, opposed to joining. Given that, one can only assume that your "will of the people" is comparable to the same "will of the people" exercised by Democratic Republics around the world. It was the plan of the political elites, not the people.

But for some reason in Europe there wasn't this overwhelming hostility to the idea of the Euro that there was (and still is) in the UK - there weren't riots and protests and stupid newspaper headlines when it was proposed, or when it was introduced. It just happened, and nowadays, it's a complete non-issue - nobody (except old and stupid people) regret the franc or the lira - it's euros now, and they work, and they work when you go to Italy, or Spain, or Germany as well - wonderful convenience.

And when you go outside the Eurozone you have a relatively stable and uncomplicated conversion to other local currencies. Before, only France, Germany and possibly Holland had what you might call "international" currencies - now everyone on the Eurozone has one. Can you imagine the fun trying to exchange Luxembourg francs or Greek drachmas in Madagascar ? Euros ? That'll do nicely, thank you.

It makes doing business internationally a great deal easier, and you now have the choice, depending on your market, of pricing in euros or dollars; pricing in euros removes problems of double exchange rates and all that stuff, and outside the Americas, the euro is rapidly becoming the currency of choice, at least in the business I'm in.

Clearly the economics have been fine for the pound and the Euro, neither is in danger of disappearing or being a disadvantage to the UK or the Eurozone (at the moment). But regardless of the economics, this hopelessly emotional and archaic attachment to having the Queen on the money is so last century. Yes, it is the will of the British people, but it's a pretty sentimental and irrational will.


User currently offlineSkidmarks From UK - England, joined Dec 2004, 7121 posts, RR: 55
Reply 21, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2414 times:

Quoting JGPH1A (Reply 20):
but it's a pretty sentimental and irrational will

And doesn't that just about encapsulate "people" as opposed to ideals and projects? It may be irrational and sentimental, but it's what many of the people living and working in the UK and around want, so therefore it isn't up to some other nationality to decide what is and what is not right for the "people" to decide.

I have no doubt in my mind that sometime in the future, the time will be right for Britain to integrate closer than it does today. until that time comes, moaning and berating us is a futile and stupid waste of time. Because as has been proven time and again in history, you tell us what we want and we'll tell you to go take a running jump. Contrary I think the word is, but one trait you Europeans would be minded to think about.

Andy  old 



Growing old is compulsory, growing up is optional
User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2411 times:

Quoting Skidmarks (Reply 21):
It may be irrational and sentimental, but it's what many of the people living and working in the UK and around want, so therefore it isn't up to some other nationality to decide what is and what is not right for the "people" to decide.

And yet it defies logic - it's woolly thinking. Nobody is going to force anyone to adopt the Euro, because we all live in democracies (in theory), but if the only reason not to (and I know there are economic reasons blah blah etc) but if the ONLY reason was that it wasn't the pound, that's a silly reason by anyone's standards.

But then the UK is renowned for it's irrational attachment to old and pointless things (like you and Banco  biggrin  )


User currently offlineIFEMaster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2398 times:

Quoting JGPH1A (Reply 20):
there weren't riots and protests and stupid newspaper headlines when it was proposed

And there haven't been any of these in the UK over any Euro proposal

Quoting JGPH1A (Reply 22):
the UK is renowned for it's irrational attachment to old and pointless things

Would you care to explain what you mean by this bigoted and offensive comment?


User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (8 years 1 week 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2384 times:

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 23):
And there haven't been any of these in the UK over any Euro proposal

There hasn't been a Euro proposal yet. And there probably won't be any riots, but there'll be protests and a LOT of stupid headlines, that's for sure.

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 23):
Would you care to explain what you mean by this bigoted and offensive comment?

Yes - it was a JOKE !! Blimey, who died and made you QFF ?


25 IFEMaster : No one, but there is nothing in your post to suggest it was a joke. The smiley appears to be directed at two individuals. Thanks for explaining.
26 777236ER : As usually, more pithy, vaguely demeaning comments from Klaus, who doesn't realise that alternate points of view to his own have a right to be aired,
27 Speedbird747BA : I respect Norway and the UK for jumping on the EU bandwagon. I don't think the EU will last too much longer though, maybe 30-40 yrs, because there is
28 ME AVN FAN : Neither is a moral authority. It simply is a currency and its administration. as your former FederalChancellor HelmutSchmidt once said, economy is 50
29 Post contains images Klaus : You poor, poor thing! I'm so brutally repressing you...! Not really - but in view of the outright hatred emanating from Britain towards what they fal
30 Braybuddy : Got it in one JGPH1A! Also whether the UK joins or not is a complete non-issue, except perhaps, for citizens of the UK. Here it's brought lower inter
31 Checkraiser : That was a problem in our early history - bickering amongst states. A lot of the world said this nation didn't stand a chance. History has obviously
32 GSM763 : For me from a convinience point of view joining the €uro would be helpful as it saves having to change money. The economies that tanked in 2002/3 pr
33 Post contains images Klaus : Nonsense. Europe is much, much more than the European Commission, which is the favourite british windmill to ride against right now. Nonsense again.
34 GSM763 : The EC does have problems like any large buracratic orgenization does. However as Klaus says Europe is much more than it. European integration has all
35 Post contains images RobertNL070 : Please explain. Although Norway maintains an amicable trade agreement with the European Union, Norway doesn't have the euro as its currency and it is
36 JGPH1A : From the tone of the rest of the post, I think the poster missed a significant "not" in his post. I think he/she meant to say "I respect Norway and t
37 RichPhitzwell : Funny, USA had to deal with this very same issue. The difference is we dealt with it a couple of hundred years ago, about the same time we decided to
38 JGPH1A : It wouldn't have happened - the memories of the war were still too fresh, Europe had been tearing itself apart for 6 years. It's a miracle it's only
39 777236ER : Why are you so convinced that a large economic downturn is just around the corner? Long term sustainability in the UK has come from sensible economic
40 Post contains images Klaus : Not my analysis - but when, for instance, real estate prices are continually rising through the roof without actual, sustainable value backing them u
41 777236ER : All this has nothing to do with the UK joining the Euro! You cite dodgy examples, and admit that what you're saying is pure speculation, yet you stil
42 Post contains images N174UA : I'm only the 2nd Yank to dip my toes in the Euro/UK shark pool on A-net? Either I'm stupid for doing so, or I'm one of few of us over here that has a
43 RichPhitzwell : I do hear you, but imagine if the USA was not under impeding war 230 years ago, we may not have a standard currency or standard interstate commerce t
44 ME AVN FAN : The British economy was reformed and modernized in the Thatcher years and since then has had, usually at least, higher growth rates than most of Euro
45 Post contains images JGPH1A : I would disagree that the wealthy don't want it. In France, the euro is a non-issue - it's simply there. Prices didn't jump up on 1 Jan 2002, in fact
46 Speedbird747BA : Whoops, I meant NOT jumping on. Cheers, Kyle
47 Post contains images Klaus : If an economy carries a major imbalance with the risk of a sudden crisis as a consequence, it's not exactly desirable for the community to share the
48 777236ER : From the bizarre to the bizarre! You're saying now that because Britain has experienced (temporary?!) gains, it should suffer the consequence and exp
49 Post contains images A342 : To all the Brits out there: Of course, you may still engrave the Queen on your future Euro coins - nobody will stop you from doing that.
50 Braybuddy : It's neither! You don't capatailise pounds, dollars or yen.
51 Klaus : If the british real estate prices should in fact turn out to have been just hyped-up with no real backing, it would of course make no sense at all to
52 ME AVN FAN : You use similar emotions as the anti-Euro people in Switzerland. The simple point about introducing the Euro is to facilitate international trade. Al
53 Paulc : How many of the countries that now use the euro actually asked the people of those countries if they wanted it - not many i think. We are supposed to
54 Gkirk : To the people who want the UK to adopt the eurocrap, Will never happen.
55 Post contains images Klaus : History is littered with the wreckages of such "never" claims...!
56 Post contains images Gkirk : You have seriously offended me! Durkah durkah, jihad against you You have now been served a fatwah of the holiest order
57 Post contains images Klaus : Phew! Another day's work is done! My complete disregard trumps your puny fatwah!
58 Post contains images Gkirk : You wish....just look at what we did to you lot between 1939 and 1945
59 Post contains images Klaus : Your grandparents vs. my grandparents... I don't see how that bolsters your fatwah one bit!
60 Post contains images Gkirk : git!
61 Post contains images Klaus : ...and to boot...!
62 Post contains images Gkirk : Aye you wish, ye sod! Yer as as Skidmarks in a nursing home!
63 Post contains images Klaus : Even sober and on a good day you're not a match for Skidmarks on his most senile one...!
64 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : Simply imagine that the British Euro/Cent coins might include some Scottish symbols. I mean things like bagpipes and whisky-bottles and kilts !
65 Post contains images Skidmarks : Hawd yer weesht, yer bawbag!! If you had brains you'd be dangerous! Andy
66 Post contains images Klaus : It's also possible that he actually had a few brains too many ground into his haggis over time...!
67 JGPH1A : Only I may issue the holy fatwah. As a hirstute grunting Pict, you are automatically disqualified, and are subject now to instant and immediate level
68 Post contains images Skidmarks : Humpahumpastickitupyerjumpa! Andy
69 Post contains links Baroque : The UK disdain for the Euro (or small furry animal as it has been called here for many years) is quite strange. The loss of interest rate control is
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