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Possibility Of Exchanging/upgrading Laptop CPU?  
User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1797 times:

Hi my computer savvy fellow anetters,


I was just wondering; would it be possible to just exchange the Celeron M410 in my current laptop to say a M430? The socket is the same but i dont know about other incompabillities that might occur.

And to stretch things further; what about putting any other CPU in that Celeron M slot? Would it hypothetically work? Say a Pentium M, Core Solo/Duo or any of that sort.

27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineRammstein From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1792 times:

It only depends on the brand/type of motherboard your laptop has. Are you able to identify it?

User currently offlineRichardPrice From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1792 times:

Most laptops have their processors soldered onto the motherboard, not socketed as they are in desktops.

If so, theres zero chance of changing it.


User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1777 times:

It's a HP nx6310 laptop, dont know about the brand of the mobo though (could it be HP?). Perhaps i should open it up and see if the CPU is in a socket or soldered.

Mainly i'm just curious if in general a laptop should be able to run with a different processor than it's delivered with..logically changing to a faster Celeron CPU from the same family should in theory work.


User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 1768 times:

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 2):
Most laptops have their processors soldered onto the motherboard, not socketed as they are in desktops.

If so, theres zero chance of changing it.

Richard, a small update please, this century's mobile PC CPUs are socketed all right:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...ocket_754.2C_90_nm.2C_Low_power.29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Celeron_microprocessors

http://images.google.se/images?svnum=10&hl=fi&lr=&q=mobile+sempron+CPU

[Edited 2006-10-30 12:21:04]

User currently offlineRichardPrice From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1757 times:

Quoting WSOY (Reply 4):
Richard, a small update please, this century's mobile PC CPUs are socketed all right:

No, most CPUs require a certain socket *version* (370, 475, 775, 971 etc) but not necessarily a physical socket to plug into so long as the motherboard provides a compatable interface.

Most mobile systems OEMs use a permanent design which has the CPU soldiered directly to the motherboard where the actual socket is part of the motherboard. In this design you cannot change the CPU easily, or in 99% of cases at all.

What the thread starter requires is a ZIF socket, which most mobile systems OEMS do *not* include because it takes up extra space, something mobile systems do not have to waste.

So I stand by my assertion that the thread starter will find this very hard, if not impossible to do, due to the way laptops are constructed.


User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1753 times:

Very well guys, i'll just open up my good ol' (actually it's only 2 months old) HP and see if the bastard is socketed or soldered. Provided there's an easy way of opening it up without risking breaking anything.

User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1753 times:

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 5):
Most mobile systems OEMs use a permanent design which has the CPU soldiered directly to the motherboard where the actual socket is part of the motherboard. In this design you cannot change the CPU easily, or in 99% of cases at all.

Richard, I understand you're a guy that's never wrong, but can you please explain to me the availability of separate(d) mobile CPUs as here:
http://images.google.se/imgres?imgur...CPU%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Dfi%26lr%3D

[Edited 2006-10-30 12:39:53]

User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1744 times:

Quoting WSOY (Reply 7):
Richard, I understand you're a guy that's never wrong, but can you please explain to me the availability of separate(d) mobile CPUs as here

Yes, that is interesting..why are mobile CPU's sold in every decent computer store if it's next to impossible to change them?


User currently offlineRichardPrice From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1741 times:

Quoting WSOY (Reply 7):
Richar, I see you're a guy that's never wrong, but can you please explain to me the availability of separate(d) mobile CPUs as here:

Because Intel and AMD will sell these chips to OEM integrators that provide low power, low heat , low noise desktop units. There are benefits to running these in normal desktop systems, which is why you can buy them.

Go ahead, take apart any laptop around you, Im going to lay money on the fact that 99% of them do not include a full socket but rather have the CPU soldiered to the motherboard.

This is an example of what Im talking about:



CPUs and no sockets. Wont be getting those off the motherboard any time soon.

I have been doing this for about a decade now, Im not talking out of my arse...

[Edited 2006-10-30 12:46:41]

User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1735 times:

Aight, point taken Richard. I'll try and open my HP up later today and see what it looks like..i'll post the results here for anyone interested.

User currently offlineRichardPrice From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1731 times:

Quoting Mika (Reply 10):
Aight, point taken Richard. I'll try and open my HP up later today and see what it looks like..i'll post the results here for anyone interested.

Yup, thats the best way to find out. Im not saying 100% for sure you will be out of luck, but my experiences have shown that laptop manufacturers dont spend out on cost which they dont need, and sockets cost them in both size, weight and parts.

You never know, you may get lucky, some desktop replacement systems do have sockets, but only the really big beasts and they are few and far between.


User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1730 times:

Richard, you're talking history now. I said "this century's" which refers to CPUs faster than around 600 MHz. Today's Mobile PC CPUs are socketed, as I said. The old PowerPC Macs that you worked with and showed to us may have been different.

How did the eBay seller I mentioned manage to pull the CPU from his laptop, if is was all soldered? And there's plenty more:
http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dll?from=R40&satitle=mobile+CPUS


Since you're a Mac user, I thought you might be interested in this:
http://paulstamatiou.com/2006/03/02/intel-mac-mini-is-upgradable/

And Richard, please observe this Mac mobo picture and the SOCKET in particular!


Humble pie, anyone?

[Edited 2006-10-30 13:08:12]

User currently offlineRichardPrice From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1726 times:

Quoting WSOY (Reply 12):
Richard, you're talking history now. I said "this century's" which refers to CPUs faster than around 600 MHz. Today's Mobile PC CPUs are socketed, as I said. The old PowerPC Macs that you worked with and showed to us may have been different.

Oh for crying out loud, pull your head out of your arse please. You post a picture of a Mac Mini - precisely the reason you can buy Mobile CPUs retail. I posted a picture of a Macbook Pro, and guess what - no socket!

99% of laptops have nonsocketed CPUs, they are soldiered to the motherboard or part of a packaged slot system specific to manufacturers. Sure, you can find exceptions, but thats all they are, exceptions, especially as laptops get smaller and smaller.

You know how many 'this century' laptops (Pentium M and above) Ive taken apart in the past 3 years? About 200. And you know how many of those had sockets? About 10.

Go ahead and argue the point, you are wrong. Ive had enough of you, enjoy talking to yourself.

Good luck Mika, I hope you have one of the rare exceptions.


User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1722 times:

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 13):
Go ahead and argue the point, you are wrong. Ive had enough of you, enjoy talking to yourself.

See you in another thead! Nice talking to you Richard!

The rest may want to take a look here: http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K8/TYPE-Mobile%20Sempron.html
The words "754-pin lidded PGA" speak of a very low-profile CPU socket that meet the desktop Socket 754 specs. The "lid" I presume refers to something that you can lift away before you remove the CPU.

[Edited 2006-10-30 13:22:52]

User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 1706 times:

Speaking of historical machines, I went and checked what was under the CPU heatsink of a couple of old HP Omnibook Xe3s. There was the old PGA solderable PIII package (700 MHz), not soldered to the mainboard, but to another thin square board underneath that was then sitting in the socket on the motherboard
The rationale behind this was, I believe, that in order to produce different versions of their product effectively, there was more freedom for HP to organise their producion that way.
With today's fast climbing MHzs, nobody wants to be stranded with obsolete mainboards with soldered-in-CPUs in their stock, so socketing rules. As I said, with the more stable product lines (such as the Mac) that risk was acceptable to some makers in the past.

[Edited 2006-10-30 13:53:19]

User currently offlineBHMBAGLOCK From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 2698 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 1701 times:

Quoting Mika (Reply 3):
It's a HP nx6310 laptop, dont know about the brand of the mobo though (could it be HP?). Perhaps i should open it up and see if the CPU is in a socket or soldered.

HP does design their own. It will almost certainly be soldered, check partsurfer.hp.com to see if the processor is available as a separate SKU to be sure.

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 5):
What the thread starter requires is a ZIF socket, which most mobile systems OEMS do *not* include because it takes up extra space, something mobile systems do not have to waste.

It also makes for a much less reliable machine in the laptop environment.

Quoting Mika (Reply 6):
Very well guys, i'll just open up my good ol' (actually it's only 2 months old) HP and see if the bastard is socketed or soldered. Provided there's an easy way of opening it up without risking breaking anything.

Most likely it's under the keyboard. Simply remove the screws on the bottom of the laptop with a keyboard icon next to them then flip back 3-4 small latches on top of the keyboard close to the screen. The keyboard should then hinge up adjacent to the spacebar. This is also how you access the factory installed memory DIMM if it needs replacement.



Where are all of my respected members going?
User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 1694 times:

HP partsurfer says does list a bunch of CPU's to the nx6310 series, it does seem like it's not soldered onto the mobo then.

User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1690 times:

The NX6130's CPUs official notes from Intel: ftp://download.intel.com/design/mobile/applnots/29852001.pdf

Quote: "this document defines the surface mount (SMT) Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) socket that will support the Micro-FCPGA mobile processor packages. The mobile Micro-FCPGA socket (mPGA479M) must be low cost, low risk, robust, reliable, and manufactureable in high volumes". And so on how the Intel mobile CPU socket works. Obviously Intel has an idea that ZIF sockets are not totally unreliable?

[Edited 2006-10-30 14:31:59]

User currently offlineBHMBAGLOCK From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 2698 posts, RR: 5
Reply 19, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1690 times:

Quoting Mika (Reply 17):
HP partsurfer says does list a bunch of CPU's to the nx6310 series, it does seem like it's not soldered onto the mobo then.

Now you need to really open it up and look at it. If it's just the processor then you're good to upgrade. More likely, it's a custom assembly with heat sink and possibly some power conditioning circuitry, etc. as well. If it's just the standard Intel processor alone or in a way that you can easily swap then you're in good shape. Be sure to use the appropriate grease or other heat transfer material between the processor and the heat sink unless you want your HP to burn like a Dell or Mac.



Where are all of my respected members going?
User currently offlineAC773 From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 1730 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1682 times:

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 13):
Go ahead and argue the point, you are wrong. Ive had enough of you, enjoy talking to yourself.

I can't speak for every laptop out there, but every last laptop I've fixed, dismantled, or looked at (It's been at least 16 now) has had a socketed CPU. I've only seen HPs and Dells, but otherwise they've run the gamut in both price and age.

Quoting Mika (Thread starter):
And to stretch things further; what about putting any other CPU in that Celeron M slot? Would it hypothetically work?

In that socket, only a Celeron M or Pentium M would work. Intel changed the socket slightly for the Core Duo and Core2 Duo.



Better to be nouveau than never to have been riche at all.
User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1676 times:

Quoting AC773 (Reply 20):
In that socket, only a Celeron M or Pentium M would work. Intel changed the socket slightly for the Core Duo and Core2 Duo.

A Pentium M probably would speed things up noticeably, right now i'm running on a 1,46Ghz Celeron M410. It's actually surprisingly "un-slow" but it'd be nice to be able to swap it for a geniune Pentium M or something similar later on.

Thanks for all the input guys, much appriceated! I will look inside the computer later and see what i can find.


User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 22, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1658 times:

Just managed to open up the laptop and have a look inside...guess what..it is socketed!  Smile I didn't think that the Intel Celeron M CPU was that small..but it's clearly connected to the mobo through a small socket with a screw-type latch that says 'On' and 'Off'.


So it's looking good, perhaps i can change my M410 for a faster one later on or even a Pentium M. It shall be interesting to try in any case.


User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 1644 times:

Mika, I think you'll be pleased with this fresh link:
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/su...portManual/c00788849/c00788849.pdf
which shows the exploded view of the 6300 series, and the compatible CPUs as per the parts catalogue.  Smile


User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (7 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1637 times:

Thanks for that WSOY, great!


Humm..dammit, do i get it right if i think that i can throw a Core 2 Duo CPU in my computer? To me it seems that all the versions of the computer have the same mainboard (except the ones with fingerprint reader etc).

I'll save that pdf and read it in detail at home; thanks once again!


25 Post contains images AC773 : Nope, sorry. Intel has a slightly different socket and chipset for their Core and Core2 Duo CPUs. If your laptop was capable of running those, it wou
26 Post contains links WSOY : My data shows that the HP nc6310 has the Intel 945GM chipset. According to the Intel site the following CPUs are supported by the 945GM: Intel® Core
27 Post contains images Waterpolodan : Not that this is useful information at all, but I've got a desktop and I bought a much faster cpu (Athlon 3200+ as opposed to 1800+) on ebay for the s
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