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Burrito Is Not A Sandwich  
User currently offlineDeltaFFinDFW From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1445 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2304 times:

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...s/111106dnnatburrito.243f7f19.html

03:01 PM CST on Friday, November 10, 2006
Associated Press

WORCESTER, Mass. - Is a burrito a sandwich?

The Panera Bread Co. bakery-and-cafe chain says yes. But a judge said no, ruling against Panera in its bid to prevent a Mexican restaurant from moving into the same shopping mall.

Panera has a clause in its lease that prevents the White City Shopping Center in Shrewsbury from renting to another sandwich shop. Panera tried to invoke that clause to stop the opening of an Qdoba Mexican Grill.

But Superior Court Judge Jeffrey Locke cited Webster's Dictionary as well as testimony from a chef and a former high-ranking federal agriculture official in ruling that Qdoba's burritos and other offerings are not sandwiches.

The difference, the judge ruled, comes down to two slices of bread versus one tortilla.

"A sandwich is not commonly understood to include burritos, tacos and quesadillas, which are typically made with a single tortilla and stuffed with a choice filling of meat, rice, and beans," Locke wrote in a decision released last week.

In court papers, Panera, a St. Louis-based chain of more than 900 cafes, argued for a broad definition of a sandwich, saying that a flour tortilla is bread and that a food product with bread and a filling is a sandwich.

Qdoba, owned by San Diego-based Jack in the Box Inc., called food experts to testify on its behalf.

Among them was Cambridge chef Chris Schlesinger, who said in an affidavit: "I know of no chef or culinary historian who would call a burrito a sandwich. Indeed, the notion would be absurd to any credible chef or culinary historian."

36 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJpax From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1018 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2285 times:

It absolutely is not a sandwich.

But Panera's Bacon Turkey Bravo sure is!!! Delicious!!  cloudnine 


User currently offlineIFEMaster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2281 times:

It ain't a sandwich. It *might* be construed as a "wrap" to some people. I call them "tasty".

User currently offlineBoston92 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3390 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2282 times:

Quoting DeltaFFinDFW (Thread starter):
Burrito Is Not A Sandwich

Good Point.



"Why does a slight tax increase cost you $200 and a substantial tax cut save you 30 cents?"
User currently offlineLHMARK From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 7255 posts, RR: 46
Reply 4, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2279 times:

A burrito is NOT a sandwich. It's an appetizer.

Signed, JCS17



"Sympathy is something that shouldn't be bestowed on the Yankees. Apparently it angers them." - Bob Feller
User currently offlineMDorBust From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2263 times:

And thus, the reason to never get tex-mex in the north east... some people there apparently don't even know what a burrito is.

User currently offlineCastleIsland From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2258 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 5):
And thus, the reason to never get tex-mex in the north east... some people there apparently don't even know what a burrito is.

Hell, I know what they are; I just think dogs should be household pets, not entrees. Wink


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26601 posts, RR: 75
Reply 7, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2241 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 5):
And thus, the reason to never get tex-mex in the north east... some people there apparently don't even know what a burrito is.

Tex-Mex? Excuse us? Burritos are NOT Tex-Mex!!

Signed,

36 million Californians.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineCactus739 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 2448 posts, RR: 31
Reply 8, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2220 times:

Quoting IFEMaster (Reply 2):
I call them "tasty".

Not many people would be daring enough to call Qdoba tasty.

Not many people would also call a tortilla filled with 49 pounds of rice a "burrito".



You can't fix stupid.... - Ron White
User currently offlineMDorBust From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2220 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 7):

Tex-Mex? Excuse us? Burritos are NOT Tex-Mex!!

Signed,

36 million Californians.

We were a state first. We get english naming rights to our bastardized mexican cooking.


User currently offlineGunsontheroof From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 3508 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2211 times:

FINALLY! A debate worth waging! Step aside, merry x-mas v. happy holidays...


Next Flight: 9/17 BFI-BFI
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26601 posts, RR: 75
Reply 11, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 2157 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 9):
We were a state first. We get english naming rights to our bastardized mexican cooking.

He have more money, so we get English naming rights.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 2153 times:

It's a burrito not a sandwich. Screw Panera! They need to put some more meat on their sandwiches. Only place I know where you walk out just as hungry as you walk in.

User currently offlineJpax From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1018 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 2140 times:

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 12):
It's a burrito not a sandwich. Screw Panera! They need to put some more meat on their sandwiches. Only place I know where you walk out just as hungry as you walk in.

The Panera I go to loads up the sandwich...I'm always stuffed 

[Edited 2006-11-12 00:52:40]

User currently offlineMDorBust From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 2125 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 11):
He have more money, so we get English naming rights.

Only if you buy the naming rights form us.


User currently offlineChi-town From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 971 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (7 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 2061 times:

In no way shape or form is a burrito a sandwich. Let Qdoba in! That place rocks

User currently offlineSATX From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 2840 posts, RR: 7
Reply 16, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2046 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 5):
And thus, the reason to never get tex-mex in the north east... some people there apparently don't even know what a burrito is.

Sounds like they knew exactly what it was; they just hoped the judge would be too stupid to see their smokescreen for what it was. Typical business bullshit, just like here in the south.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 7):
Tex-Mex? Excuse us? Burritos are NOT Tex-Mex!!

Signed,

36 million Californians.

Don't bring up that horrible Cal-Mex nonsense. When cilantro is the spiciest thing on your plate...

Proper Mexican fusion goes in this order:

1. NM-Mex
2. TX-Mex
3. AZ-Mex
4. CA-Mex



Open Season on Consumer Protections is Just Around the Corner...
User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 17, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2043 times:

Quoting DeltaFFinDFW (Thread starter):
WORCESTER, Mass. - Is a burrito a sandwich?

I rest my case...



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2031 times:

Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 17):
Quoting DeltaFFinDFW (Thread starter):
WORCESTER, Mass. - Is a burrito a sandwich?

I rest my case...

One could see why a bunch of boiled dinner scrod eatin' yanquis might have this problem....see, there's something wrong when you even have to ask the question.

FYI:

The burrito becomes courtly

Sandwich may lose marginal constituent

George Barnes Barnestorming
gbarnes@telegram.com





Back when this country was still a colony of England, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams were sitting around one day, daydreaming out loud about what they would want to see if their insurgency was successful in ousting the British from America.

They agreed they wanted a place where people, not kings, would rule. It would be a nice place, a happy place where people would have life and liberty and get to enjoy the pursuit of happiness.

But this nation would not be a free-for-all. There would have to be courts, just in case one man’s pursuit of happiness interfered with another man’s pursuit.



The men did not realize it at the time, but their discussion foreshadowed an event 230 years later that would lead to Worcester Superior Court ruling on what defines a sandwich.

“Explain to me again why we would need this legal system,” Thomas Jefferson asked.

Mr. Jefferson believed in letting people do their own thing. Mr. Adams was more practical.

“Some day, Tommy boy,” John Adams replied, “someone will want to know if a burrito is a sandwich. They will want to know what the legal definition of a sandwich is. Our courts will decide that case.”

Mr. Jefferson smiled, because he knew John tended to be a little overly dramatic sometimes.

“The courts would never consider anything so trivial,” he thought to himself. “Courts would be needed, but mainly to decide issues of property, legal responsibility in horse cart crashes, or whether one silversmith was stealing the copyrighted design of another silversmith. Those were big issues.”

“John, my friend, I agree with you on the need for courts, but what is a burrito, anyway?” he added out loud.

“Well Tom, a burrito is a tasty fast food from the Spanish colonies down south. It is a flat cake called a tortilla wrapped around food, especially beans, cheese and maybe meat, Mr. Adams said.

“So it’s a sandwich,” Mr. Jefferson said.

“No, Tom,” Mr. Adams replied in an exasperated tone. “I told you it is made with a tortilla. Sandwiches are made with bread. A tortilla is a cake.”

“Well, how was I supposed to know?”

“Well if you would just listen, Tom. The key ingredient in a sandwich is two slices of a food, defined by young Noah Webster’s New World College Dictionary, as baked from a leavened, kneaded dough made with flour or meal, water and yeast. Or, it is any baked food like bread, but made with a batter, such as quick breads or corn bread.”

“With cinnamon and raisins?”

“Fine, Tom, sometimes. We know how much you enjoy your cinnamon and raisin bread. But please focus for a minute. A tortilla is a cake because, like certain types of cakes, by definition it is a small, flat mass of dough or batter, or some hashed food that is baked or fried. Cake, of course, is also a mixture of flour, eggs, sugar, etc. baked in a loaf, often covered with icing.”

“With cinnamon and raisins?”

“No Tom. I don’t think they make cinnamon and raisin cakes.”

OK. Whatever. But we at least agree that courts will be needed in our new country,” Mr. Jefferson said.

“Agreed. Now, moving on. What about the slavery issue?” Mr. Adams asked. “I say we should not allow slaves in our new nation. It makes us look bad.”

“I don’t know,” Mr. Jefferson said. “I can’t make up my mind. Could that issue be decided by the courts?”

“What about women’s rights?”

“The courts.”

“Legalization of marijuana for purposes other than rope making?’

“The courts.”

“Hey John, do you think a pita salad is a sandwich?”

“Hmmm. Maybe if you add mayo.”

“I don’t know. It isn’t made from two slices of bread. So what do you think, John?”

“Let the courts decide.”

“Probably, but this could get real complicated. If you think the burrito issue is a problem, what about a six-layered Dagwood sandwich? There are a lot more than two slices of bread in it, but they call it a sandwich.”

“You’re right, Tom. It is complicated. Is a hamburger on a bun a sandwich? I’m thinking it is meat and the bun is extraneous. That would be another good one for the courts.”

“You know what I’m thinking, John?”

“What, Tom.”

“I’m thinking all this talk of food is making me hungry. I could go for some soup, maybe corn chowder.”

“I prefer clam chowder, Tom, but that makes me wonder. Is chowder soup? What would the courts say?”


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26601 posts, RR: 75
Reply 19, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1990 times:

Quoting TX" class=quote target=_blank>SATX (Reply 16):
Don't bring up that horrible Cal-Mex nonsense. When cilantro is the spiciest thing on your plate...

Um, I think the exact opposite. Any Tex-Mex I have had, and I have had it in Houston, Amarillo, El Paso and San Antonio, has been as mild as an ice cube. I mean, Queso Dip? On the other hand, I regularly eat habanero salsa in California

Quoting TX" class=quote target=_blank>SATX (Reply 16):
1. NM-Mex
2. TX-Mex
3. AZ-Mex
4. CA-Mex

More like this:

CA-Mex
NM-Mex (which is not the same as New Mexican Food, which is really good)
AZ-Mex






TX-Mex



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineMDorBust From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1972 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 19):
Um, I think the exact opposite. Any Tex-Mex I have had, and I have had it in Houston, Amarillo, El Paso and San Antonio, has been as mild as an ice cube. I mean, Queso Dip? On the other hand, I regularly eat habanero salsa in California

I'm beginning to worry about your culinary tastes there Alireza.

You went off on Queso Dip on BHM too... and I was equally befuddled there. You see, Queso Dip isn't really Tex-Mex cooking. It's a creation of chain restaurants to fill appetizer space. Here's the other hangup.. Tex-Mex cooking isn't a BTU contest. If you want super spicy food go eat Thai or Indian. Now, if you really want to base your claims about Tex-Mex cooking off of the offerings of chain restaurants, that's your call... But I'll stick with the stuff I find in little hole in the wall places. You know, the places that sell to actual Mexicans instead of making a bland menu that can appease a wide variety of taste dead Americans in other states.


User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1967 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 20):
But I'll stick with the stuff I find in little hole in the wall places. You know, the places that sell to actual Mexicans instead of making a bland menu that can appease a wide variety of taste dead Americans in other states

The best way to figure this out is to go about lunchtime or about 4 in the afternoon when folks get off of work. Take a peek at who's eating. If it's gringos, pass it up.


 Wink  Wink  Wink


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26601 posts, RR: 75
Reply 22, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1945 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 20):
You know, the places that sell to actual Mexicans instead of making a bland menu that can appease a wide variety of taste dead Americans in other states.

Well, that would be just plain Mexican food, wouldn't it?  Wink

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 20):
But I'll stick with the stuff I find in little hole in the wall places.

Absolutely.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineSATX From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 2840 posts, RR: 7
Reply 23, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1895 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 19):
Um, I think the exact opposite. Any Tex-Mex I have had, and I have had it in Houston, Amarillo, El Paso and San Antonio, has been as mild as an ice cube. I mean, Queso Dip? On the other hand, I regularly eat habanero salsa in California

Here in SAT I pour the fresh salsa over my plate and feel the burn. It's great. If you don't see fresh salsa, then you're probably eating at some gringo-friendly place where the patrons are too ignorant to know any better.

If you know of some good Mexican restaurants in CA then pass 'em my way; I'm always willing to give it another try. Of course, if you want true spicy, then NM is your best bet, pure and simple.



Open Season on Consumer Protections is Just Around the Corner...
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26601 posts, RR: 75
Reply 24, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 1848 times:

Quoting SATX (Reply 23):
Here in SAT I pour the fresh salsa over my plate and feel the burn. It's great. If you don't see fresh salsa, then you're probably eating at some gringo-friendly place where the patrons are too ignorant to know any better.

The only thing better that fresh salsa is fresh guacamole

Quoting SATX (Reply 23):
If you know of some good Mexican restaurants in CA then pass 'em my way; I'm always willing to give it another try. Of course, if you want true spicy, then NM is your best bet, pure and simple.

NM spicy? I don't know if any Mexican food can really be called spicy after you have had a nice hot vindaloo or something from a Thai restaurant.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
25 SATX : I've eaten Thai food both here and in Thailand with all the hottest little chilies sprinkled liberally over everything. Kicked my ass in the most del
26 N1120A : My favorite thing about Mexican food is the way the spices react with chicken, shrimp and fish.
27 Post contains images Atrude777 : Now ya'll making me hungry for a Quesadilla! Whats that?! :-P Alex
28 Post contains images KaiGywer : Now I'm just hungry...think I might have to go to Chipotle this afternoon and get a sandwich...err....burrito
29 Post contains images Skidmarks : I thought a Burrito was a small horse or donkey Andy
30 N1120A : Chipotle, much like Qdoba, is not a proper burrito. What's the matter Andy? Can't fathom something boiled tasteless and smothered in mint sauce?
31 Post contains images KaiGywer : I don't care what they call it, it's still damn good
32 Hawaiian717 : True... it's better.[Edited 2006-11-21 05:39:11]
33 Post contains images Skidmarks : My dear boy, you don't "boil" Lamb, you roast it. And you use enough mint sauce to enhance the taste. Tsk, such ignorance. Now, this Burrito stuff, t
34 N1120A : Beans, rice, fresh grilled choice cuts of meat (chicken breast, filleted white fish, shrimp, lean steak, etc.), perhaps a bit of cheese and some gril
35 Post contains images Skidmarks : Yes, guess I do. Anything sold through a chain of "fast food" outlets to me is junk. However, it's all down to taste, so whatever floats your boat. I
36 N1120A : You haven't been to El Pollo Loco, Baja Fresh or La Salsa then. Just because food comes quickly doesn't mean it isn't fresh or healthy.
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