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UK Kerb US Curb - Question  
User currently offline808TWA From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 701 posts, RR: 20
Posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2162 times:

***Boring topic warning***

In North America if you are driving down a main road and you turn off of this road into a shopping mall or driveway, why is there a huge dip in the road and what looks like a reduced height curb as you enter?

Quite often you will scrape the underside of your car because of this or find that the grade changes drastically, such as a sudden climb or descent as you enter. This "lip" is also rough to cross.

However, in the UK, where usually the weather is much wetter requiring good drainage, the entrance ways and driveways do not have this "lip" and the surface is the same level as the roadway you have just exited from resulting with a smooth transition from roadway to driveway.

Just curious if anyone would know the reason for this as some of them in the Toronto area can be quite brutal and you can see the gouges in the road where vehicles have made contact.

Thanks

-Alan


Love is in the air, so practice safe flying
4 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGlydrflyr From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 207 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2113 times:

Yes, I have a theory about this. I believe that THERE ARE NO ADULTS IN CHARGE of ensuring proper design or construction of these driveways (along with a whole lot of other things) either in Canada or the States. They just simply draw up the plans and the contractor builds it, secure in the knowledge that no matter how badly the job is done, no one will reject it, or require it to be done over. Case in point: At EWR, huge amounts of money were spent in recent years to renovate the roadways and parking lots, yet whenever it rains small lakes form at the junction of the parking lot pavement and the walkways to the terminals. These lakes are too big to jump over, too shallow to swim through and conveniently placed so that you must ford them somehow. Nobody from the Port Authority or the contractor who did the work give a damn about the problem, and nothing will be done until the lakes freeze and someone breaks a vital part of their body and sues, then the offending walkway, and only that one, will be patched, but not fixed.


if ya gotta crash, hit something soft and cheap!
User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 2, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2105 times:

Quoting 808TWA (Thread starter):

In North America if you are driving down a main road and you turn off of this road into a shopping mall or driveway, why is there a huge dip in the road and what looks like a reduced height curb as you enter?

Quite often you will scrape the underside of your car because of this or find that the grade changes drastically, such as a sudden climb or descent as you enter. This "lip" is also rough to cross.

However, in the UK, where usually the weather is much wetter requiring good drainage, the entrance ways and driveways do not have this "lip" and the surface is the same level as the roadway you have just exited from resulting with a smooth transition from roadway to driveway.

The City of Zurich about 10 to 15 years ago had a minister for traffic who even specialized on such "lips". He claimed that the idea came from the USA and was to force drivers to reduce speed. He therefore authorized the erection of such "lips" in 30kms, 15kms, 50kms or whatever zones, which were quite jumpy in a way. Many or even most of them in the meantime have been modified into being less agressive nowadays.
-


User currently offline808TWA From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 701 posts, RR: 20
Reply 3, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 2074 times:

Thanks for both of your responses.

Quoting Glydrflyr (Reply 1):
Glydrflyr

I too have found much shoddy workmanship locally and always put it down to possibly a "make work" project, knowing that the repair will require repairing again in the not to distant future.

Quoting ME AVN FAN (Reply 2):
ME AVN FAN

We have speed bumps and certain narrowed streets, which in some cases only allow one vehicle through at a time from either direction. Toronto City seems to like slowing traffic down even though traffic is already clogged and bairly moving anyways.

This has actually backfired as some areas are complaining that emergency vehicles are being delayed.

Not sure if these lips at driveway entrances are to slow vehicles down or not as that could cause accidents with people rear ending a slowly exiting vehicle, but like I said, I really don't know the real reason and was just curious if I was escaping the obvious


-Alan



Love is in the air, so practice safe flying
User currently offlinePlymSpotter From Spain, joined Jun 2004, 11615 posts, RR: 60
Reply 4, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 2067 times:

Quoting 808TWA (Reply 3):
This has actually backfired as some areas are complaining that emergency vehicles are being delayed.

Where I live, the local council had the foresight to place many of these actually around the hospital. Nobody told the milk float driver either, so when he came down the road at 4am in the dark and hit an 8 inch high speed bump it created quite a mess!

Regarding your initial post; although the UK is generally wetter, the rainfall events in North America can be much more sudden and intense compared to what we get here. For instance, we might get an inch of rain over an entire day, but a good storm related downpour your side of the pond could tip that much down in just an hour or so, because of this the infrastructure has to be deigned to take all that extra flow - hence a bigger gulley.

Another reason could be the re-surfacing method used; in the UK we remove the old worn out layer of tarmac/ concrete, take it away for recycling and then lay down the new surface so that there is no change in level of the road. I know that in other countries they often don't bother removing the old surface (or only at the sides by the pavement if there is one to maintain the gutter) so that over time you get a slightly humped effect. In itself it's no bad thing, as it improves drainage, but I can see that it could present a problem with low sprung cars if turning off.

I know it sounds geeky, but I wouldn't mind seeing some pictures of what you are describing, as this kind of thing interests me.

Dan Smile



...love is just a camouflage for what resembles rage again...
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