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Native Spanish Speakers: I Need Help  
User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3554 times:

I just have a simple question I hope doesn't come off too dumb  Smile.

What is your opinion of spanish accents other than your own?

A little background infomation: I'm studying spanish on my own with a great program for about 5 months now. Its a slow process but im coming along. I have decided to take a two week vacation to Madrid and attend a spanish school there called Don Quijote or maybe Eureka. I want to go so I can be in a spanish speaking environment all day and they can help me clean my spanish up. I have some interactions with Spaniards since about 2-3 days a week I work with the Iberia flight and I can hear the Spanish "th" sound. They seem to use "Vale" a lot lol...which Im not sure what it means. I can just say is your bag unlocked or wait on the other side and hope they don't start rambling on.

Now I have been told by a reliable source that some accents are more difficult then others. Im no where near fluent so I don't know how everything is supposed to sound in spanish. On this website here from the U of Texas at Austin http://www.laits.utexas.edu/spe/index.html I can listen to native speakers from all over. I think the Chiliean, Peruvian(I watch Laura) and the Argentina accents are a little harder. A friend told me Agentina's Spanish flows like Italian.

Well I like listening to Venezuelan, Mexican, and Madrileno accents(thats why I want to go to Spain since everything seems more concentrated on latin American Spanish here so I want to be different lol). If I really have to budget myself I may look to latin American instead of Spain. But for tryng to become bilingual I'm not sure where I should go first withthe time I have. Im looking at many different schools now.

But to make a long story short after the fact lol, how would you describe another spanish accent different from yours? "Por empleo" if you are Mexican what would you say of a Colombian accent? Is it harder or easier and clearer? So on and so forth

p.s. in trying to just listen to more spanish to get my ear used to hearing it I watch telemundo sometimes and I have fallen in love with Shakira. I can sing basically all of La Tortura and now Im a fan of Alejandro Sanz. His new single with Shakira "Te Lo Agradezco, Pero No" is GREAT! Even though I don't understand everything yet!

Gracias por la informacion!

65 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCarmenlu15 From Guatemala, joined Dec 2004, 4761 posts, RR: 30
Reply 1, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3547 times:

Do we need to get there again? I thought it was already decided that Guatemalan Spanish is the best of all! Big grin

Just kidding...

There are accents and there are accents. Personally, I find Caribbean Spanish (Cuba, Puerto Rico) hard to understand. It's too fast and sometimes slurred.

Mexican Spanish (as spoken in Mexico, not the variety you'll find in the Mexican telenovelas) is quite clear.

I also like the way Costa Rican Spanish sounds (just don't tell anyone I said that, I might get expelled from my country!)

Argentinian Spanish deserves its own category. It may not be as clear as other Spanish accents, but man, it drives me crazy!  hearts 

Spanish from Spain is a whole different world, as you may have notice. The accent, the "th" sound, the use of vosotros as opposed to ustedes in Latin America... but at the end of the day we all understand one another perfectly.

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
They seem to use "Vale" a lot lol...which Im not sure what it means.

Sort of like saying "OK" in English.

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
Peruvian(I watch Laura)

I wouldn't consider señorita Laura to be an accurate representation of Peruvian Spanish, I must say.

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
But for tryng to become bilingual I'm not sure where I should go first withthe time I have. Im looking at many different schools now.

Don't take this from me, 'cause I may be biased... but I've heard that some of the best Spanish schools are located in Guatemala (namely, in the city of Quetzaltenango). Apparently it's because Guatemalan Spanish doesn't have that much of an accent, or so they say.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to the opinions of my fellow Spanish Speakers from other regions.

Espero te sea de utilidad...  Smile

Saludos  wave 
Carmen



Don't expect to see me around that much (if at all) -- the contact link should still work, though.
User currently offlineLan_Fanatic From Chile, joined exactly 13 years ago today! , 1071 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3541 times:

Well you' ve got a huge question here  Smile

Chileans like me (from what I've seen) have a lot of prejudices to other spanish accents.
We think our accent is the most neutral one, until we realise it is one of the ugliest in the continent.

We find extremely sexy the argentinean/uruguayan accent (the River Plate Basin one) but we can also find it the most hateful, snobby, disgusting accent in the world. And yes, it sounds as an italian spoken spanish.

The same applies to the commonly used castilian spanish, with all its "ths" and "shs". You either love it or hate it. And they use the "vosotros" which is so outdated, LOL.

Then, for the common chilean, there are only three more accents, the "peru/bolivian", the "caribbean" and the "mexican accents".

I love the peruvian accent, as it sounds so correctly pronunciated in every word it makes me envious. At least for me it is the most perfect spanish accent.

I don't know enough about the bolivian accent to judge it, but the one thing I don't like about it is that they pronunce Rs like Ys

Then, I can identify the Colombian accent, which I like very much, but sounds so "servant to landlord" (FOR ME) with all its "usted" that it ends annoying me.

Then I cannot differentiate between the venezuelan, cuban, puertorican, central american accents.They're all the same for me and I don't like them at all.

And finally the mexican, which I don't like (don't know why) but most people in Chile tend to find funny and nice going.


That's all from me.
To all spanish speaker in this forum, feel free to criticise the chilean accent!


User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 3, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3532 times:

Quoting Carmenlu15 (Reply 1):
I also like the way Costa Rican Spanish sounds (just don't tell anyone I said that, I might get expelled from my country!)

Personally, I hate how journalists write and speak in Costa Rican Spanish.  irked  They always try to be fancy by using words nobody else would ever use to describe something, like for example saying "privados de libertad" instead of "prisionero" for a prison inmate. It's like journalists here try to imitate us Germans, and we do know how to be more "elegant" with using alternate words for something. Big grin

Quoting Lan_Fanatic (Reply 2):
Then, I can identify the Colombian accent, which I like very much, but sounds so "servant to landlord" (FOR ME) with all its "usted" that it ends annoying me.

Well, those who have heard me speak or seen me write in Spanish know that I'm almost the master at that, as I use almost always the "usted".  Wink

Quoting Lan_Fanatic (Reply 2):
To all spanish speaker in this forum, feel free to criticise the chilean accent!

Actually, I don't have a problem with the Chilean accent, after having worked once for a year with a Chilean boss. There's much worse.  Wink

Note to the people in the Costa Rican press, especially Channel 7 news: somebody who has been kidnapped is a real "privado de libertad", not an inmate! Prison inmates forfeited their freedom by committing the very crime they got convicted for, they did not lose it like hostages tend to have lost it.  Angry


User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3526 times:

One of my yahoo buddies has studied spanish for many years now as he teaches it for Big Brother (the Government)!!

They send their students, usually people associated with the government in some higher form to many spanish speaking countries. He really loves Quito, Ecuador. He believes the spanish in Ecuador is very clear. In addition to that I'm told students who do spanish immersion should probaly go to Guatamala, Mexico sans Mexico City, or Costa Rica since its cheaper and also the spanish spoken in those places won't be too hard on a non native ear. Any place will do since you will get used to the accent I believe. I really like the accent from Madrid. I thought about Barcelona but I found out Catalan might distract me.

Im on level 3 of an 8 level course. I hope to be finished with my own program then be off for the first time internationally to somewhere lol. I really do not hear one peep about Uruguay, Paraguay or Bolivian accents. I found out from this site called "Yabla" southern Spaniards don't prononuce their "s" in words.

I think I would like to go to Venezuela but they really don't have immersion schools there. I like how they speak. Honestly I will listen to Hugo Chavez ramble all day! I can hear their words so good even though I may not know the meanings. The first thing I heard Mr. Chavez say was "Ayer Estuvo El Diablo Aqui", aint it wierd??

Im African American, WHEN I become fluent or at least functional and I start my spanish visits to Mexico and Central/South America I wonder If I could pass for a Dominican or Peruvian but with a Castillian speech if I study in Spain lol. So many places to choose from.


User currently offlineRufruf From Canada, joined Oct 2006, 42 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 day ago) and read 3521 times:

As long as it isn't French spanish.

A Western Canadian


User currently offlineRCS763AV From Colombia, joined Jun 2004, 4395 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 3506 times:

Quoting Lan_Fanatic (Reply 2):
Then, I can identify the Colombian accent, which I like very much, but sounds so "servant to landlord" (FOR ME) with all its "usted" that it ends annoying me.

Indeed, there have been many theories saying that colombians have a sense of inferiority for the way we talk.

But if a Colombian is calling you by usted, its either b/c it´s a guy or if its a girl, she hates you.

Colombia has very different accents depending on the region, as do Mexico and Argentina. The most understandable is the spanish from the Cundinamarca region (including Bogotá).

Argentinian spanish may be very complicated but the accent is HOT.

Peruvian spanish (when spoken by a person who speaks decently) is very nice, if spoken by a low-class its horrible.

Chilean spanish is plain weird. They have these conjugaitons that only exist there.

Panamanian spanish is horrible, they sound like rappers the whole time, while Costa Rican spanish looks very much like Cundinamarca spanish, only it sounds slower.

Mexican spanish from Mexico DF is very cool, it is a bit vulgar but its entertaining to hear. Monterrey spanish looks a lot like "paisa" spanish (Medellin-Manizales-Pereira-Armenia), from Colombia.

Caribbean spanish= HORRIBLE.

Spain´s castillian would be understandable is they spoke a bit slower, but it is very nice.

Ecuadorian spanish sounds dumb.

[Edited 2006-11-19 15:34:45]


Les escribo desde el frío de mi verde altiplano.
User currently offlineMarambio From UK - Scotland, joined Oct 2004, 1160 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 3473 times:

Mr Tsaord, you've entered one of the most discussed, subjective and hot topics in the whole Spanish-speaking world. No accent is really "neutral" in our language, and most news anchors on international networks, such as CNN en Español, must take special courses in order to avoid using localisms, i.e. words or sentences that would make no sense whatsoever outside a certain region or country.

I would consider Ríoplatense Spanish (Argentina and Uruguay) the most independent accent of all. Not only do we have completely different vocabulary, but our constructions also vary greatly from other types of Spanish, and that goes far beyond the famous "vos" we use instead of "tú". The accent itself also varies from place to place, and so does the vocabulary - a person from Mendoza (Western Argentina) speaks differently than a guy from Córdoba (Centre), who sometimes cannot understand a man from Buenos Aires. I would even dare to say Argentine Spanish on its broadest expression, generally called Lunfardo, may be considered a whole different language, because of its strong uses of Italian and French loan-words, among others, which would make it completely non-understandable for a foreigner.

I'd say Bolivian Spanish is the most neutral one. They speak using all the constructions and correct tenses, which is something that does not happen in Argentina or anywhere in the Latin world - except perhaps in some parts of Colombia. As for the strangest and most difficult accent, the winner is Paraguayan. People in Paraguay do not speak proper Spanish, despite being completely able to do so. It's more like a pidgin mixturing Spanish and Guaraní - even in the upper classes. The lower the class, the more Guaraní the pidgin has. But even the richest people in Asunción use some Guaraní vocabulary, and it is normal to hear a person talking in Spanish, while another answers to him in Guaraní.

The great thing is, making a very little effort we all get to understand each other, no matter where we are from. And that's great.

Saludos,
Marambio

[Edited 2006-11-19 21:24:28]


Aerolíneas Argentinas - La Argentina que levanta vuelo.
User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 3448 times:

I looked up a school in Buenos Aires called Ibero. I started looking at BA because the currency is cheaper there than Europe (help me out on that one).

The pictures I have seen of it looks so beautiful and I read their Spanish sounds so unique. The whole "Argentinan accent is harder" kinda scared me away. But I still might consider it.


User currently offlineMarambio From UK - Scotland, joined Oct 2004, 1160 posts, RR: 25
Reply 9, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 3439 times:

Quoting Tsaord (Reply 8):
The whole "Argentinan accent is harder" kinda scared me away.

Harder I don't believe, for once getting used to it, after a couple of days, all Spanish speakers can get what we are saying, despite how awkward it may sound. Harder, nah - unique, certainly. And we are definitely proud of that.  Smile

Saludos,
Marambio



Aerolíneas Argentinas - La Argentina que levanta vuelo.
User currently offlineCaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 3435 times:

Quoting Lan_Fanatic (Reply 2):
That's all from me.
To all spanish speaker in this forum, feel free to criticise the chilean accent!

Since i don't see any Mexicans responding, I will respong on their behalf. I live in Mexico and I learnt spanish here, and I love their accent, moreso people from the DF.

Chilean spanish is interesting, they speak very fast as well. I have from friends from Paraguay and at first I found it difficult to understand but they speak like people whose toungue is not spanish, easier for me. Big grin

Spanish, the th sound makes in interesting though I don't like it.

I like to hear central americas, Honduras, Guatemala. I love Mexican spanish and is very easily understood. The argentine accent is very cool, sounds like Italian though Big grin

Caribbean spanish, no. They need to say more of each word.. Big grin



There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineAndesSMF From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 3407 times:

Quoting Tsaord (Reply 4):
He really loves Quito, Ecuador

Why? GYE is tons better now. (Hometown)

Quoting Tsaord (Reply 4):
He believes the spanish in Ecuador is very clear.

And the best...

Quoting Captaink (Reply 10):
moreso people from the DF.

We are talking about Tepito?


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 3401 times:

Quoting Carmenlu15 (Reply 1):

I also like the way Costa Rican Spanish sounds (just don't tell anyone I said that, I might get expelled from my country!)

Why?

Hey everybody, Carmen says that.....  Wink


User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 13, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 3 hours ago) and read 3387 times:

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 12):
Quoting Carmenlu15 (Reply 1):

I also like the way Costa Rican Spanish sounds (just don't tell anyone I said that, I might get expelled from my country!)

Why?

Hey everybody, Carmen says that.....

Say what? We'll have to take care of that.

Signed,
All Guatemalan A.netters  duck 


User currently offlineSFOMEX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 3381 times:

Quoting AndesSMF (Reply 11):
We are talking about Tepito?

LOL... The funny thing is that many people really believe that everybody in Mexico City speaks with that weird, vulgar accent. The fact is that, as ugly as it would sound, only the poor and uneducated have that peculiar accent. Certainly, you won't find it in a Spanish as second language school. In many parts of the city, you would never hear it.

Having said that, I think that the Argentinean Spanish is beautiful, but it's a no-no for somebody learning Spanish. The way they speak it is quite different from the rest of the continent.

Tsaord: I'd recommend you Colombia (Bogota) or some cities in Mexico like Cuernavaca or Guanajuato. Their Spanish would be easier to learn.


User currently offlineCaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 15, posted (7 years 10 months 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 3376 times:

Quoting SFOMEX (Reply 14):
Tsaord: I'd recommend you Colombia (Bogota) or some cities in Mexico like Cuernavaca or Guanajuato. Their Spanish would be easier to learn.

I learn't spanish in Taxco, Guerrero, there is a language school there (CEPE, part of UNAM). It was really interesting, the people there really sang, it was neat.  Cuernavaca was 1.5 hours from Taxco and the accent didn't vary too much so I agree it was easier to learn.

Now I live in Aguascalientes, and upon arrival I thought the people spoke incredibly fast, and they do at least compared to Tasqueñans.

What I have noticed is that people from different states in Mexico speak really differently. YOu have experience it to understand it but sometimes the accent is extremly different, so I don't think 'mexican' spanish can be generalized. I think it also has to do with the fact that Mexico is a big country with a huge population, whilst other Latin American countries are smaller you tend to hear similar accents throughout the country.I
[Edited 2006-11-20 08:11:04]

[Edited 2006-11-20 08:28:49]


There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1835 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3357 times:

Quoting Carmenlu15 (Reply 1):
Spanish from Spain is a whole different world, as you may have notice. The accent, the "th" sound, the use of vosotros as opposed to ustedes in Latin America...

Well, you get the absence of 'th' as well in Canarian and some Andalusian dialects, too, and also the 'ustedes' thingie, too. Pure Castillian Spanish (à la Salamanca or Burgos) sounds a bit too rough on my ears, and Madrileno's leismo and laismo sound awful to me.

My fav would be a very mild Andalusian accent, like the one found in Canal Sur.

The trick is exposing yourself to material from many different countries, so that you're used to the differences. TV and music are your friends here Big grin


User currently offlineIB6400 From Mexico, joined Jun 1999, 247 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3323 times:

Quoting SFOMEX (Reply 14):
LOL... The funny thing is that many people really believe that everybody in Mexico City speaks with that weird, vulgar accent. The fact is that, as ugly as it would sound, only the poor and uneducated have that peculiar accent. Certainly, you won't find it in a Spanish as second language school. In many parts of the city, you would never hear it

Well said SFOMEX!!! I definitely hate when I travel abroad and I say I come from Mexico and people start making fun of that vulgar accent!!! People can find even up to three different accents in Mexico City. Which to my knowledge are the upper class (the "fresa" one) the middle normal class and that horrible weird vulgar accent. I don't know why some people in LatAm think we speak "a la" Pedro Infante!! Big grin

The Mexican telenovela spanish is probably one of the most plain Spanish I ever heard.

I absolutely love Argentina's Spanish.

Chile's accent is so soft for me... I love it too!!

Caribbean Spanish it's horrible!!! It's very difficult for me to understand them!! (Con el debido respeto que todos mis hermanos de Cuba, Puerto Rico y República Dominicana me merecen. ¡Lo siento, pero no me gusta para nada!)


Quoting Marambio (Reply 7):
The great thing is, making a very little effort we all get to understand each other, no matter where we are from. And that's great.

¡Amén!

Joaquín  Smile
Mexico City



Yo soy yo más mis circunstancias - J. Ortega y Gasset
User currently offlineSchoenorama From Spain, joined Apr 2001, 2440 posts, RR: 25
Reply 18, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3317 times:

If you want to hear both Spanish as South American accents, then Madrid is definitely the best place to come  Wink

I personally like the Gallego accent. And with Gallego I mean a person from Galicia, not the Argentinian meaning of the word Gallego (with which they mean Spaniards in general).



Utinam logica falsa tuam philosophiam totam suffodiant!
User currently offlineAndesSMF From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3313 times:

Quoting Captaink (Reply 15):
whilst other Latin American countries are smaller you tend to hear similar accents throughout the country.I

Then go to Ecuador, where the cultures of Quito (mountains) and Guayaquil (coast, my place) are completely different. I can spot a 'serrano' just from the way the speak, dress, act, etc.

Quoting IB6400 (Reply 17):
I definitely hate when I travel abroad and I say I come from Mexico and people start making fun of that vulgar accent!!!

My wife would say the same thing. Two different languages, almost.


User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5733 posts, RR: 31
Reply 20, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3308 times:

Quoting Carmenlu15 (Reply 1):
Argentinian Spanish deserves its own category. It may not be as clear as other Spanish accents, but man, it drives me crazy!

Why? I don´t speak Spanish, but it sounds fine to me and I can understand the few words I know as easily as Spanish Spanish.


User currently offlineYVRlonghauler From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3306 times:

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
But for tryng to become bilingual I'm not sure where I should go first withthe time I have. Im looking at many different schools now.

I guess, you'd have to take into consideration the "environment", so to speak, where you plan to speak Spanish. The general consensus is that you should learn the one accent of the region you live in, in this case North America. However, there's quite a lot of Hispanic diversity here! Ask yourself the following question: how would you "feel" about an Argentinian speaking to you with an Australian English accent? or, a Mexican with a South African accent?

Quoting Lan_Fanatic (Reply 2):
We think our accent is the most neutral one, until we realise it is one of the ugliest in the continent.

I think this happens to people living in countries whose language is spoken in more than one country.

Quoting SFOMEX (Reply 14):
Tsaord: I'd recommend some cities in Mexico like Cuernavaca



Quoting Captaink (Reply 15):
Cuernavaca was 1.5 hours from Taxco and the accent didn't vary too much so I agree it was easier to learn.

I've heard this from several people. Although,

Quoting Marambio (Reply 7):
I'd say Bolivian Spanish is the most neutral one.

I've heard this too.


User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3291 times:

double post sorry

[Edited 2006-11-21 05:30:26]

User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3289 times:

I think mexican spanish is one of the clearer versions, then again it depends where you hear it though. I guess most Mexican telenovelas (no I don't watch that crap) have the clearest versions.

I think people from GDL have a pretty neutral accent, and usually around MEX as well, then again it depends who you are talking to.

The one accent I hate is the one hard-core sonorense accent. They say "leshe" instead of "leche" and "pos" instead of "pues" and so on... 20 years later I still get confused. O but they definitely have the best cussing out there Big grin

i.e.:

inches jijos de su shingada maidre!

LOL  Silly


User currently offlineCarmenlu15 From Guatemala, joined Dec 2004, 4761 posts, RR: 30
Reply 24, posted (7 years 10 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3289 times:

Quoting Marambio (Reply 7):
The great thing is, making a very little effort we all get to understand each other, no matter where we are from. And that's great.

Totally agree.

Quoting Captaink (Reply 10):

I like to hear central americas, Honduras, Guatemala.

See? At least someone that agrees with me. Big grin

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 12):
Hey everybody, Carmen says that.....

And then they say us women can't keep quiet...  Wink

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 13):
Say what? We'll have to take care of that.

Signed,
All Guatemalan A.netters

Why are there so many people with torches outside? It's not Independence Day... Hey wait a minute, they are heading to my house! What is all that banging at the door?! Scheiße...  flamed 

Quoting SFOMEX (Reply 14):
The funny thing is that many people really believe that everybody in Mexico City speaks with that weird, vulgar accent.

That's exactly what I meant... Mexican accent as spoken on TV often has nothing to do with the real Mexican accent.

Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 20):
Why? I don´t speak Spanish, but it sounds fine to me and I can understand the few words I know as easily as Spanish Spanish.

Oh, nothing wrong with it... in fact, I (and some other a.nutters, from the likes of it) think that

Quoting RCS763AV (Reply 6):
the accent is HOT

That I meant with 'driving me crazy'. Oooh...  melting 



Don't expect to see me around that much (if at all) -- the contact link should still work, though.
25 Derico : I think what Carmenlu and the others meant is that there are some differences in the entirety of the language, but the basic words tend to be the sam
26 Shinkai : Is the different accent of Spanish something like the different accent of English? Like the English spoken in England sounds different to the English
27 Captaink : I would say. I am a natural english speaker, from the caribbean island of Grenada. (no I don't have a Jamaican accent, and I too find it difficult to
28 Braybuddy : Right, thanks Derico. Listening to them talk amongst themselves though, even if I can´t understand a word, it actually SOUNDS okay. I´ve heard a fe
29 JJJ : In short, yes. In some cases the differences may be more extreme than in the English dialects you mention. Some words are different, the whole pronou
30 Braybuddy : Must be REALLY bad then!
31 Post contains images SJUboeingGirl : As a puertorrican I find that central american spanish is really difficult for me to understand, Mexican for the accent and for the other central amer
32 AndesSMF : Please, accept my apologies, but learning spanish from 'Puelto Lico' is not really a good idea.
33 Post contains images RCS763AV : Wow, you really aren´t a native speaker....MEX accent is hilarious, its very noticeable. Sorry, it´s just spanish from Puelto Lico is one of the mo
34 Post contains images FLY2HMO : No juzgues tan rapido... Dude, did you even read this?: Around MEX, its not the same tone when you talk to a chica fresa (like my cousin ) , a busine
35 Post contains images LTU932 : I have come to repossess your passport. You're officially state-less. Signed, Oscar Berger Come to my workplace here in La Aurora and I can guarantee
36 Braybuddy : There´s one accent which is very noticeable down here, and it´s the harshest Spanish accent I have ever heard. There are guys on the streets selling
37 Post contains links and images FLY2HMO : This video sums their tone of voice pretty well: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVhUUh0uP6M The stereotypical fresa is a pretty, fashionable, spoiled
38 Post contains links Tsaord : http://www.donquijote.org/english/la/mexico.asp If I don't go to MAD this school has many in Spain and Latin America. But only in Spain and Latin Amer
39 LTU932 : Pretty much like the stereotypical "popular girl" from teen movies? In any case, I did have my encounters with chicas fresas in school.
40 Post contains images FLY2HMO : Sounds about right. Or the "supid blonde" type if you'd prefer
41 AndesSMF : I would say it sounds a lot more like "Valley Girl".
42 Post contains images LTU932 : Haha. **WARNING: START OF RANT** Personally, I hardly see any stupid blondes, except for one who was in High School and was the daughter of the Germa
43 Post contains images Carmenlu15 : Again, the "typical" MEX accent is not what you find when you're actually in MEX... Oh great... Who wants to adopt me now? (Which reminds me, passpor
44 Post contains images LTU932 : That vid was priceless!
45 RCS763AV : I have DF friends, both high class (one is the son of the owner of Mexico´s second biggest construction company) and normal, and the accent is notic
46 Lamedianaranja : What we call 'a sifrina' in CCS. Very abundant in the capital too. I learned to speak Spanish 25 years ago, Venezuelan way, and from that moment on I
47 Marambio : "Cheta" or "concheta" in Argentina. These species tend to live in the northern suburbs of Buenos Aires, namely in San Isidro - or, according to their
48 Post contains links Captaink : I would suggest that you check out UNAM. That is where I learn't spanish and the school has a wonderful reputation. In Mexico there is the main campus
49 Post contains images Carmenlu15 : Ok, I'll give you that MEX accent is quite noticeable... Reminds me of one time when I was in SAL, talking with one of my Salvadorean colleagues. The
50 Post contains images Captaink : I have a good friend here in mexico who is from Honduras and he also speaks like that, hardly pronunciating the 's' in his words. Interesting I say,
51 Post contains images IB6400 : I just can't stop laughing for the "Fresa" girl video!!! But that accent is very stressed and that's not the way preppy people sound! Anyway... I'm tr
52 Post contains images Usnseallt82 : ¿Quisiera usted joder? This is all I've needed so far.
53 Post contains images Carmenlu15 : I wouldn't say it's ugly either... kinda funny, yes, but sounds nice to the ear. No tanto... We don't have much of an accent actually, which is why t
54 GSM763 : Hmm I'm just going to assume that is the Guatemalan way of saying "like" every 30 seconds
55 Post contains images Usnseallt82 : Si preguntan a alguien que, ellos definitivamente lo saben.
56 LTU932 : It's more like "Yeah, well..." instead of "like".
57 Post contains images Captaink : HAHA funny. I find that many Mexicans say "este" when they speak. It is like a word to place in the sentence while give thought as to how you are goi
58 Post contains images LTU932 : Not only in Mexico, but also in Costa Rica and perhaps also in Argentina. There are many more countries in Latin America where people say a lot "este
59 Captaink : I just looked at the video.. That is sooo wrong.. o sea.. HAHAHAHA
60 Post contains images Lt-AWACS : I first started learning Spanish when I lived in Maracaibo as a kid, then back in Texas during High School and College and on many trips to Mexico and
61 102IAHexpress : During my college days one of my many phone jobs was working as an interpreter. It was convenient as I was able to work from home. I interpretered th
62 Tsaord : The th sound isnt hard lol. Just lisp when you come to pronounce words with ci or ce....I think lol. Okay...what is with this Castillian Spanish is b
63 Tsaord : My friend just told me what joder means! No I don't need that. When I go to Spain and it happens then fine lol
64 SFOMEX : I guess you meant "guagua", Cuban slang for bus! You made me laugh so hard...
65 Tsaord : Spanish schools in Spain seem so expensive now. I just may go to Guadalajara or somewhere in Guatamala. Thanks for all the information. Now I'm debatt
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