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London Tube: Why "Way Out" And Not "Exit"?  
User currently offlineF.pier From Italy, joined Aug 2000, 1523 posts, RR: 9
Posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5556 times:

A lot of people don't know English, but knows the meaning of some English word.
Everywhere you can see the word "Exit", all aprund the world, but not in London Tube, because they don't use the word Exit but Way Out....
Do you know why?

76 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMyt332 From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2003, 9112 posts, RR: 71
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5547 times:

We like to be bloody minded.


One Life, Live it.
User currently offlineUALPHLCS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5550 times:

I think the British will probably tell you it's because "Exit" is a verb. "Way out" is a description. The British like to pick nits like that.

User currently offlineAerobalance From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 4681 posts, RR: 47
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5552 times:

Quoting F.pier (Thread starter):
Way Out....
Do you know why?

No.



"Sing a song, play guitar, make it snappy..."
User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5547 times:

Exit is Latin. Way Out is Anglo-Saxon. We are maintaining the purity of our language you Latin speaking swine!  snooty   Wink


She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineUALPHLCS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5530 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 4):

LOL


User currently offlineFrancoBlanco From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5498 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 4):
We are maintaining the purity of our language you Latin speaking swine!

Gut, dann können wir ja gleich auf Deutsch miteinander sprechen!

 wink 

Sebastian


User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5496 times:

It's because "Far Out" is just too 'Sixties ....

User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 5490 times:

Quoting AerospaceFan (Reply 7):
It's because "Far Out" is just too 'Sixties ....

Or too John Denver.

Urban legend says the sings were supposed to read "Way out, man!" but an economy drive shortened it.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineMatt72033 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 1617 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 5481 times:

because we prefer to keep the foreign muck who cant understand english trapped underground looking for the way out!  Wink

User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 5473 times:

Quoting UALPHLCS (Reply 2):
think the British will probably tell you it's because "Exit" is a verb. "Way out" is a description. The British like to pick nits like that.

In Britain, people apparently tend to see "exit" in the way of the normal door or even emergency exit, but the large thing as a "way out". And when on long distance roads of the big kind they are on the "motorway" while the small road between the two parts of a house-complex is the "mews". And a subway in London has nothing to do with underground-railways but is just a pedestrians-way below the road.

[Edited 2006-12-13 19:18:13]

User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 5473 times:

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 8):
Urban legend says the sings were supposed to read "Way out, man!" but an economy drive shortened it.

Whoa, that's totally awesome! Dude!

 

[Edited 2006-12-13 19:17:51]

User currently offlineMatt72033 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 1617 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 5465 times:

Quoting ME AVN FAN (Reply 10):
while the small road between the two parts of a house-complex is the "mews".

first ive heard of it  Confused


User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 5456 times:

Quoting Matt72033 (Reply 12):
first ive heard of it

What? I can't believe it!

It's simply the cat's meow, it is, mate.

 Wink


User currently offlineMatt72033 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 1617 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 5445 times:

Quoting AerospaceFan (Reply 13):

ahhh. thanks for clearing that up!


User currently offlineAerospaceFan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 5440 times:

Quoting Matt72033 (Reply 14):
ahhh. thanks for clearing that up!

I always aim to please.

 Wink


User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5398 times:

Quoting Matt72033 (Reply 12):
while the small road between the two parts of a house-complex is the "mews".
--
first ive heard of it

-
here a nice explanation :
-
‘Mews’ as a name for a particular type of London street got its name in a rather roundabout way. In the Middle Ages to ‘mew’ meant to moult or shed feathers and the cage where a hawk might be put in its moulting season was sometimes called a ‘mew’. Henry VIII kept his hawks in Charing Cross, roughly where the National Portrait Gallery stands today. Although he replaced the mews with stables for his horses, it kept its name of ‘The Mews’. From then on, ‘mews’ – a plural word, now frequently used in the singular - became the name for any small street or yard in Georgian or Victorian London designed for stabling horses and carriages.
-
www.mewsliving.co.uk/main_frame.htm
-
-
and it is particularily practical to park cars. When in London with my own car or a hired one I prefer a particular hotel where you can leave you car in the mews right behind the hotel.
-


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5397 times:

Quoting ME AVN FAN (Reply 10):
while the small road between the two parts of a house-complex is the "mews".

It can be, but not necessarily. A mews was a collection of buildings containing the stables for the horses. Obviously, most of these have been converted into residential areas, and highly desirable ones too, because the nature of the stables was that they were away from the main street. The mews isn't just any old gap between houses, it has a historical significance.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineDL021 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 11446 posts, RR: 76
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5367 times:
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Quoting UALPHLCS (Reply 2):
The British like to pick nits like that.

England and America.....two great countries separated by a common language...



Is my Pan Am ticket to the moon still good?
User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5350 times:

Quoting F.pier (Thread starter):
Do you know why?



Quoting Banco (Reply 4):
Exit is Latin. Way Out is Anglo-Saxon. We are maintaining the purity of our language you Latin speaking swine!

Same reason they call a car trunk a boot . . . or a subway a tube . . . or add extra letter "u"s all over the place . . . humour and the like . . . they constantly mis-spell words . . . quite aggravating if you ask me.

 duck 

 flamed 

 laughing 


User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5340 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 19):
they constantly mis-spell words . . . quite aggravating if you ask me.

The UK and the US.
Two countries divided by a common language


User currently offlineAerobalance From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 4681 posts, RR: 47
Reply 21, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5340 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 19):
quite aggravating if you ask me.

No kidding. Driving on the wrong side of the road, on the wrong side of the car - what's that about - I guess I'll find out more tomorrow as I leave for their Island in about 3 hours...



"Sing a song, play guitar, make it snappy..."
User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 22, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5340 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 19):
quite aggravating if you ask me.

Well, you have to understand it's for us intellectual Brits. One can understand the American need to simplify things, by removing letters and so forth.  snooty   Wink



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineCosec59 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5334 times:

Quoting Aerobalance (Reply 21):
Driving on the wrong side of the road, on the wrong side of the car - what's that about -

Apparently it goes back to the days when the main mode of transport was horses. A majority of people are right handed and therefore would carry a sword in their right hand. By riding on the left, their sword hand was then closest to any rival heading towards them.


User currently offlineAerobalance From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 4681 posts, RR: 47
Reply 24, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 5327 times:

Quoting Cosec59 (Reply 23):
their sword hand was then closest to any rival heading towards them.

Note to self: buy sword when arriving at LHR tomorrow...



"Sing a song, play guitar, make it snappy..."
25 Post contains images Banco : And incidentally, driving on the left is scientifically safer. It's been shown that in a crisis, humans will pull to the left, not the right, if they
26 Banco : They sell them at Immigration. Go and ask one of the officers.
27 Post contains images Helvknight : Well the thing is in America and Europe they drive on the right side of the road, whele we English drive on the correct side. Oh, and we can spell as
28 Myt332 : Not to mention rhyme too.
29 UALPHLCS : Technically this is true. My understanding is that Americans began driving on the other side of the road because the company that made Conestoga Wago
30 Post contains images SmithAir747 : Being a student here in London for 3 years now... I have almost totally been brainwashed by you Brits! Now I spell everything the British English way,
31 EGTESkyGod : Uhhhhh......... I have seen "Way Out" signs at train stations here in Sydney too........ Not just an English thing.
32 Post contains images ANCFlyer : I think they make a pill for that, Smitty . . . .
33 Post contains images Banco : Isn't that a suppository? Explains your accent 'Flyer...
34 Wingscrubber : Would all americans please note that south africa, india, pakistan, bangladesh, sri lanka, saudi arabia, united arab emirates, oman, iraq, iran, afgha
35 UALPHLCS : So The English aren't the only ones who are wrong then, eh?
36 ME AVN FAN : - historically and "scientifically" correct of course. But when I learnt properly English in 1972 I had to concentrate onto the main-meanings of term
37 N1120A : I take it you mean West Germanic? That would be better put as ausgang, or "Go Out" My old office in London was on a Mews.
38 Post contains images Skidmarks : Ah well, that's why you lot buggered off to the Western Continent in the first place - basically too lazy to spell correctly, couldn't speak the Quee
39 Post contains images Blrsea : Sorry, we Indians drive on both sides of the road, whichever is convenient
40 Post contains images Skidmarks : I think what he meant was that you are SUPPOSED to drive on the left. What you actually do, well, thats a moot point! Andy
41 Post contains images ANCFlyer : Well, we kicked your asses outta here didn't we . . . The US Virgin Islands does as well, WTF? It's cool if you're in a left hand drive car, but that
42 N1120A : Iran drives on the Right in Left Hand Drive cars. You may well have gotten a couple of those others wrong too.
43 Post contains images Skidmarks : That's because we are gentlemen and not ruffians with loose morals and no taste for tea!! Andy
44 Post contains images Kieron747 : That's because we invented the language, and are therefore allowed to nitpick!      See above, read the script fella! Aggravating!? At least we do
45 Express1 : Exit, way out what's the difference,as long as their are signs to guide you out of the underground then who cares,the less time i spend down there th
46 Sebolino : You're right. And by the way, the proper word is "Sortie". Silly Rosbeefs.
47 Post contains images Express1 : Dam and here's me thinking that Sortie was the name for a French post office worker dave
48 BCNGRO : Actually it's greek. English took it from latin, but this comes from greek "exodos".
49 BNE : Too me with the London Underground Way Out sounds better than Exit as with some stations you have to travel a long way to get above ground which would
50 Post contains images Helvknight : D'oh!! I did say spell not type
51 ME AVN FAN : just as confusing as jail and gaol -- while goal is the difference
52 Post contains images BCNGRO : BTW, "maintain" - latin "manu tenere" "purity" - latin "purus" "language" - latin "lingua"
53 ME AVN FAN : - Let's suggest some new REAL English words : maintain to be replaced by "to underhalt" purity to be replaced by "rinehite" language to be replaced b
54 Post contains images BCNGRO : Zat zounds a bit like german to me.
55 Post contains images BMIFlyer : "Way Out" is basically what it is - the Way Out Exit, is now commonly used for "Emergency Exit" on the transportation network, and in most buildings t
56 Post contains images Banco : Yes. I reckon you might be taking that comment just a tad seriously... Au contraire, mon ami. "Sortie" describes a military excursion. Which would be
57 Post contains images Kieron747 : Kieron747
58 Post contains images Gkirk : Point proven
59 Post contains images Cornish : Which is why it is purposely used as the word Exit in French
60 N1120A : That I tend to run in higher class circles than the local sheep farm?
61 Baroque : Watch it, or we will bring on a discussion of the GALLON. Not sure about the sword bit from ?Banco. I thought it was related to the side from which y
62 Post contains images Sebolino : Ahhh those perfidious albioners !! Actually you're not totally wrong, for once. Sortie is used when one go outside, be it an exit door, or an excursi
63 Post contains images Baroque : So "C'est magnifique mais ce n'est pa la guerre" does not describe a sortie as Banco suspected but as we all knew really means "It is magnificent but
64 Post contains images EWRCabincrew : Where is Canada, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and Ireland in all this? Plus, all these countries add the "u" and others in their words. Maybe
65 Arsenal@LHR : Is it? You can add Canada along with the US, i've never seen any words written in the UK-style anywhere in Canada. It's a US clone as far as the Engl
66 Post contains links EWRCabincrew : Good comparisons here: http://www3.telus.net/linguisticsissues/BritishCanadianAmerican.htm Not all Canadians spell as the UK does, Nor do all Canadia
67 Post contains images Banco : I'm not sure I've ever been so praised by a Frenchman!
68 Post contains images Scbriml : Oh dear, I seem to have been driving on the wrong side of the road here in Dubai for the last 5 months! Not to mention my brief visit to Oman.
69 Post contains images LH423 : Would all English please note that proper nouns such as nationalities and countries are capitalized in the English language? Official Canadian spelli
70 Post contains images Banco : No, no. You see, as Americans you have to abide by rules. Us English can do what we damn well please.
71 Post contains images AerospaceFan : Don't surprise me a bit. Kinda explains why y'all speak with that funny accent.
72 ME AVN FAN : that funny accent they speak happens to be world-English. Quite unlike the many and often very strange dialects in the USA.
73 StrasserB : In Germany we have different words as well: "Ausgang" means "the way to go (walk) out" "Ausfahrt" means "the way to drive out". "Auslass" is a hole in
74 F4phantom : its a shame the yanks do not have enough basic grasp of the English language to understand what friendly fire is
75 Post contains images AerospaceFan : I know. I was just joshin'.
76 BA767s : A colleage of mine used to work for LU. It's not exit because It isnt a direct exit to a safe area (in the event of a fire or something?) It's way out
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