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Feel Like Thieving? Steal A Jet Engine!  
User currently offlineKieron747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1299 times:

What plonkers!

Two men from south London have been charged with theft after a jet engine worth £60,000 went missing from an industrial estate in Kent.

The men, aged 47 and 36, were arrested when a lorry was stopped by police near Kent International Airport, Manston, and found to have an engine on board.


I mean why? It's not like you can slip it into your back pocket and flog it at the local open-air market!

What the hell were they going to do with a damn jet engine!?..

...Ebay?

Kieron747

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/6199879.stm

[Edited 2006-12-21 14:44:37]

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12242 posts, RR: 35
Reply 1, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1293 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting Kieron747 (Thread starter):
...Ebay?

 rotfl 

Seing the items for sale on Ebay, it wouldn't surprise me. Look for it to be on a tricked out Honda Civic  Wink



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineLeezyjet From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 4041 posts, RR: 53
Reply 2, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1248 times:

Quote:
The 36-year-old is charged with two more jet engine thefts on 5 December.

Doesn't appear to be the first time either.

Maybe it was SQ or EK trying to get enough parts together to build their own A380's !!!.

 Smile



"She Rolls, 45 knots, 90, 135, nose comes up to 20 degrees, she's airborne - She flies, Concorde Flies"
User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1237 times:

Quoting Kieron747 (Thread starter):
I mean why?

I'm gonna guess there's a market for "used" engines somewhere. Surely there's an operator out there that can use the spares or the entire engine, and wouldn't mind paying a "discount" price for it.

It does beg the question though . . . how the hell they gonna get it? It's not like you can FedEx an engine to PoDunk Airlines . . .  crazy 


User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12242 posts, RR: 35
Reply 4, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1229 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Probably going to the black market in Africa. Some of those operators seem happy to have something with wings that flies every now and then.

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 3):
It does beg the question though . . . how the hell they gonna get it? It's not like you can FedEx an engine to PoDunk Airlines . . .

Put it in the back of UTA's Civic and drive it to Africa (see reply 1)  duck 

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 1):
Look for it to be on a tricked out Honda Civic



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7408 posts, RR: 50
Reply 5, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1199 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Kieron747 (Thread starter):
What the hell were they going to do with a damn jet engine!?..

...Ebay?

Maybe, but they'll most likely break them down and sell the parts on the black market. It's staggering how much money you can get from an engine piece by piece. Remanufactured engine parts are sold as new by these guys to fly by night operators in Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia, and some might find their way to US and European carriers if they aren't careful(as in a ValujetDC9 that burned burned out on a taxiway from faulty engine parts back in 1994). These bootleggers are pretty devious with the phoney packing.



Made from jets!
User currently offlineKieron747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1195 times:

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 5):
as in a ValujetDC9 that burned burned out on a taxiway from faulty engine parts back in 1994

Hadn't heard about this one - any more info?

Thanks

Kieron747


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1179 times:

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 5):
(as in a ValujetDC9 that burned burned out on a taxiway from faulty engine parts back in 1994).



Quoting Kieron747 (Reply 6):
Hadn't heard about this one - any more info?

This one perhaps???



http://www.planecrashinfo.com/1995/1995-30.htm


User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7408 posts, RR: 50
Reply 8, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1164 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Thanks ANC. It happened in 1995 in ATL. I remember reading about it in Time Magazine when I was going through school to get my A&P license. It talked about bogus and faulty parts by bootleggers.

http://www.answers.com/topic/aircraf...equipment-not-elsewhere-classified
The late 1980s saw a rash of problems associated with the manufacture of faulty and inadequate parts. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sets guidelines for the quality and precision of airline parts and certifies the acceptability of manufacturers. However, prior to the appearance of bogus parts in the late 1980s it had no measures in place to enforce conformity with these standards. When aircraft mechanics discovered that parts of inferior quality had infiltrated the spare parts marketplace, several task forces set about to establish more stringent means of identifying and monitoring parts.

The problem of bogus parts continued to plague the industry in the late 1990s. The cause of a ValuJet engine explosion on the ground at Atlanta in June 1996 was determined to be an engine that had been overhauled by a repair station in Turkey that lacked FAA approval. The engine contained a crackled and corroded compressor disk. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) uses the term "unapproved parts" in its official accident reports. A three-month investigation by Business Week revealed that bogus parts, including fakes, used parts sold as new, and new parts sold for unapproved purposes have found their way into the inventory of every major airline in the country. In 1996, some fire extinguishers intended for Air Force One were found to be falsely certified by a repair station.

While bogus parts were not routinely causing accidents, the problem of substandard parts had grown substantially in the 1990s. One supplier mislabeled spacers with fake Pratt & Whitney labels, but was caught by an astute airline mechanic. Clearly, parts are not labeled as bogus by the suppliers, but are laundered from used, stolen, or substandard parts, or are incorrectly specified as meeting standards via a number of means. Parts brokers adding false paperwork sell to unsuspecting brokers which sell to an unwitting FAA approved facility or airline. The FAA regulates manufacturers, repair facilities, and aircraft operators, but it is more difficult to regulate parts brokers. Although there have been hundreds of indictments and convictions, the airlines rely primarily on sharp-eyed mechanics to spot counterfeit parts.


This is a good article. 3rd paragraph down. It discusses the safety record of Critter(Valujet)
http://understandinggov.org/reports/felcher2.html
And it also references the outcome of when the engine came apart.
ValuJet's safety problems were not limited to a single, geriatric DC-9. The airline had a rap sheet a mile long. An engine had exploded on one plane as it had rolled toward takeoff, ejecting shrapnel into the fuselage and injuring seven people inside, including a flight attendant who was permanently disfigured in the fire. ValuJet pilots, among the most poorly paid and least experienced in the industry, routinely flew in weather that grounded other carriers. Their compensation plan paid them only for flights completed, a disincentive to play it safe and stay out of the sky. The inexperienced pilots were infamous for overrunning runways--in the winter of 1995 ValuJet planes overshot runways at Washington's Dulles International Airport, in Atlanta, and in Savannah. Passengers on two ValuJet flights landing in Nashville had scares: one plane came down with a hard landing, and another experienced a nose-gear collapse. While ValuJet pilots may not have been skilled at routine landings, they certainly had plenty of experience touching down in emergency situations: in 1994 the airline made fifteen emergency landings, and in 1995 it made fifty-seven. Just five months into 1996 the company had broken its own record--fifty-nine emergency landings, almost one every other day.

It's pretty shocking to see how well these counterfeit part are disguised as legit parts.

[Edited 2006-12-21 17:51:44]


Made from jets!
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