Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Computer Help  
User currently offlineTZ757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2868 posts, RR: 6
Posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1132 times:

Here's the deal. A while ago, I reinstalled Windows because there was some serious internal software issues happening and I thought just over-writing the whole OS would do the trick. I thought it did, but today I realized that it didnt overwrite my Windows, but there is a second Windows program on my hard drive. Why? I have no clue. So now I have two HUGE OS's on the hard drive and now I only have 20% of my Hard drive space instead of at least 50%. Does anyone have any good ideas on how to get rid of the bad windows?


LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8451 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1128 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Reformat and repartition your drive, it is the best way to do it, but BACKUP YOUR DATA FIRST OR IT WILL BE LOST!


After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineTZ757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2868 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1124 times:

Once I reformat and repartition the drive, how exactly do I put Windows back onto the hard drive?


LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8451 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1124 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

If you insert the windows CD and follow the instructions carefully the reformat and repartition is part of the procedure.


After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineTZ757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2868 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1118 times:

But thats the thing, I did that same exact option and I ended up with 2 Windows on my hard drive. Can't I just get my hard drive completely wiped and start from there?


LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
User currently offlineAC773 From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 1730 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1115 times:

Quoting TZ757300 (Thread starter):
I thought it did, but today I realized that it didnt overwrite my Windows, but there is a second Windows program on my hard drive. Why?

I'd be willing to bet that when you re-installed Windows, you did a quick-format. The quick option is really only meant for brand new drives, and old HDDs need a full format.

All you need to do is re-install Windows and make sure you delete all partitions and do a full format using NTFS (I presume you're installing XP).

That should do it.  Smile



Better to be nouveau than never to have been riche at all.
User currently offlineTZ757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2868 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1113 times:

Quoting AC773 (Reply 5):
I'd be willing to bet that when you re-installed Windows, you did a quick-format. The quick option is really only meant for brand new drives, and old HDDs need a full format.

All you need to do is re-install Windows and make sure you delete all partitions and do a full format using NTFS (I presume you're installing XP).

Thanks AC, but what is the effect of having no partitions on the hard drive?

Also, I'm considering upgrading my hard drive so something bigger by the time college comes around. How would I go about installing Windows and transferring all my files to that?



LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8451 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1112 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting TZ757300 (Reply 6):
what is the effect of having no partitions on the hard drive?

AFAIK you have to partition today's big drives because Windows has issues with the size, but I may be wrong.



After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineAC773 From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 1730 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1101 times:

Quoting TZ757300 (Reply 6):
Thanks AC, but what is the effect of having no partitions on the hard drive?

It just lumps everything into one big happy volume. Unless you need separate virtual drives to sort your data, there's no reason to have any partitions.

Quoting TZ757300 (Reply 6):
Also, I'm considering upgrading my hard drive so something bigger by the time college comes around. How would I go about installing Windows and transferring all my files to that?

If it's a desktop, you can simply install the hard drive and use it for miscellaneous data while using your old drive for Windows. If it's a laptop, all you need is an external USB enclosure along with your new drive (about $30 from a place like Newegg.com). Put the new drive in the enclosure and use a program like Acronis TrueImage to clone the data onto your new drive. Put the new drive in the notebook and the old one in the enclosure, and your machine should boot up just like it always did. After you clean out the stuff in your old drive you'll end up with a new, bigger hard drive in your machine and a bonus external drive.

Quoting Andz (Reply 7):
AFAIK you have to partition today's big drives because Windows has issues with the size, but I may be wrong.

You're half right. Before XP, consumer versions of Windows used an MS-DOS core and the FAT32 filesystem. FAT32 limits drive volumes to 32 GB, so large drives running Windows ME and earlier versions had to have partitions in order to utilize all their space. XP brought with it the NT core and NTFS filesystem, and the volume limit was gone for good.



Better to be nouveau than never to have been riche at all.
User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1057 times:

Quoting AC773 (Reply 8):
Reply 6):
Thanks AC, but what is the effect of having no partitions on the hard drive?

You won't be able to access any of your drive, that's it. You first partition the disk space into the addressable blocks you need, often just one, then format it (them) to the filesystem you need (NTFS is the preferred choice for later Windowses).
After formatting, the partitions normally become accessible by their letters (C: D: and so forth).
The Windows setup program, when run from the installation CD, will both partition and format the drive if you so instruct.


User currently offlineAC773 From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 1730 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1036 times:

Quoting WSOY (Reply 9):
You won't be able to access any of your drive, that's it.

Strictly speaking, yes. But if you delete all of your drive's partitions when installing XP, the installer will automatically create one big one to span the drive.

Let's not make things any more complicated than they have to be.  Smile



Better to be nouveau than never to have been riche at all.
User currently offlineTZ757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2868 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1025 times:

So I can have no partitions on the HDD and still access my files? I dont have any need to separate the drive into anything else. I just got my External HDD for overflow


LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
User currently offlineAC773 From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 1730 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1017 times:

Quoting TZ757300 (Reply 11):
So I can have no partitions on the HDD and still access my files?

 checkmark 

Windows will take care of it for you.



Better to be nouveau than never to have been riche at all.
User currently offlineTZ757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2868 posts, RR: 6
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 998 times:

Well I'm glad to say that I am now free of my old windows and now have a brand spankin new copy on a clean, formatted drive. This thing runs like new again. Plus, with my 160GB External HDD, I have loads of new room to do basically whatever I want. Granted it took me about 5 hours from start to finish, but the result was worth it.

Thanks everyone who helped!!!



LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
User currently offlineDamirc From Slovenia, joined Feb 2004, 726 posts, RR: 7
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 985 times:

Quoting AC773 (Reply 5):
I'd be willing to bet that when you re-installed Windows, you did a quick-format. The quick option is really only meant for brand new drives, and old HDDs need a full format.

Um. No.

Quick means just create the filesystem and do not perform a bad block check on the drive ....

D.


User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 973 times:

Quoting AC773 (Reply 10):
Let's not make things any more complicated than they have to be.

Yes l agree. Therefore I said it's wrong to say an unpartitioned space "lumps everything together" as you put it. In reality unpartitioned space is not acessible to any other programs than the ones that create the actual drive filesystem for other software to use. No "lumping".



Quoting AC773 (Reply 8):
FAT32 limits drive volumes to 32 GB

Mysteriously, I myself have created some very large FAT32 partitions, e.g. by drive cloning. Some partitioning tools let you do it, some not.
See here:
http://www.petri.co.il/install_windo...s_xp_on_large_fat32_partitions.htm


User currently offlineAC773 From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 1730 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 957 times:

Quoting Damirc (Reply 14):
Quick means just create the filesystem and do not perform a bad block check on the drive ....

Fair enough, though in my experience, an NTFS quick-format occasionally leaves the old OS bootable at startup.

Quoting WSOY (Reply 15):
Yes l agree. Therefore I said it's wrong to say an unpartitioned space "lumps everything together" as you put it.

Is it wrong to say that? Yes, technically.

Does it make a discernable difference in the real world? No.

I don't know how many times I've installed XP, but every time the procedure is the same. Delete all partitons, format the unpartitioned space, and let XP install itself on that. It leaves me with a single volume spanning the full capacity of the drive, and I don't have to put any more thought into it.

Again, I'd rather not split hairs.



Better to be nouveau than never to have been riche at all.
User currently offlineWSOY From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 946 times:

Quoting AC773 (Reply 16):
I don't know how many times I've installed XP, but every time the procedure is the same. Delete all partitons, format the unpartitioned space, and let XP install itself on that.

I think this is just what has lead to your confusing the terms. The fact that the XP installation software does both the partitioning and formatting for you, may have prompted your thinking they are the one and the same. Sorry, I just had to point this one out, no hard feelings, I hope.


User currently offlineDamirc From Slovenia, joined Feb 2004, 726 posts, RR: 7
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 931 times:

Quoting WSOY (Reply 15):
Mysteriously, I myself have created some very large FAT32 partitions, e.g. by drive cloning. Some partitioning tools let you do it, some not.

It does work. The limit is imposed by politics rather than technology. I currently have a 151GB FAT32 partition. NTFS is all sweet, but if you're dual booting any flavor of Linux you know how nice it is to write to NTFS partitions from Linux  Wink

Quoting AC773 (Reply 16):
Fair enough, though in my experience, an NTFS quick-format occasionally leaves the old OS bootable at startup.

That would be the root block, the OS is not really bootable, but the boot loader starts to load only to fail, because it cannot find anything on the drive to boot.

Quoting AC773 (Reply 16):
Delete all partitons, format the unpartitioned space

Sorry, to be anal ... but You cannot format unpartitioned space. You can delete all the partitions, create a new partition (or several of them) and then you're on to formatting. No offence.

D.


User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 924 times:

This thread is being locked at the request of the thread starter, as all of the questions the user had have been answered.

Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Computer Help - Java Won't Behave! posted Sun Dec 17 2006 23:17:15 by Dragogoalie
Computer Help Needed posted Sun Nov 12 2006 04:02:39 by VonRichtofen
A Little Computer Help, For The Experts... posted Thu Oct 12 2006 23:45:54 by Waterpolodan
I Need Computer Help: Proxy Servers posted Mon Oct 2 2006 14:02:15 by UH60FtRucker
Computer Help, Please posted Sat Sep 23 2006 17:21:40 by FSPilot747
Computer Help (Motherboard Issues) posted Thu Jun 8 2006 18:57:44 by Garnetpalmetto
Computer Help! Please posted Mon Apr 24 2006 09:29:13 by Pilotdude09
Computer Help: Don't Have MS Office Disk posted Thu Mar 16 2006 03:46:07 by AMSMAN
Computer Help Needed... Urgent! posted Sun Feb 12 2006 21:16:36 by Jaspike
Computer Help Please posted Thu Feb 9 2006 23:56:38 by Gilligan