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Drug War: Good News/Bad News  
User currently offlineMDorBust From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1240 times:

The Good News:

Quote:

The 20-month investigation led by the Drug Enforcement Administration and aided by more than 100 federal, state, local and foreign law enforcement agencies, has so far resulted in the seizure of approximately $45.2 million, 27,229 pounds of marijuana, 9,512 pounds of cocaine, 705 pounds of methamphetamine, 227 pounds of pure methamphetamine or "ice," and 11 pounds of heroin.

The investigation has also netted $6.1 million in property and assets, as well as roughly 100 weapons and 94 vehicles. The drug ring is based in Sinaloa, Mexico.

HOLY CRAP!

That's a huge seizure.

Good job boys.



The Bad News:

Quote:

But The Combat Meth Act restricted the number of tablets a person can buy in one day, thus resulting in some regular cold medications to now be behind the counter at your local pharmacy.

The amount one person can buy is now limited to 3.6 grams, which is 146 30-milligram tablets during a 30-day period.

It's because of that restriction that makes making meth harder here in the United States, so, Mexican drug rings have seized that opportunity.

"Mexican drug trafficking organizations have realized 'ok, there's a new need,'" Robertson said.

So, drug cartels are cooking meth in what are called 'super labs' outside of the country, then smuggling the drugs into the United States through regular smuggling routes along the southern border.

Yeah, it's still a PITA to buy some cold medicine, and it's done nothing to combat Meth making.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,255523,00.html

24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 1226 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Thread starter):
Quote:

The 20-month investigation led by the Drug Enforcement Administration and aided by more than 100 federal, state, local and foreign law enforcement agencies, has so far resulted in the seizure of approximately $45.2 million, 27,229 pounds of marijuana, 9,512 pounds of cocaine, 705 pounds of methamphetamine, 227 pounds of pure methamphetamine or "ice," and 11 pounds of heroin.

The investigation has also netted $6.1 million in property and assets, as well as roughly 100 weapons and 94 vehicles. The drug ring is based in Sinaloa, Mexico.

 faint 

That's a pretty good spot of Cocaine. 27K pounds of MJ - roughly a pound per plant - is kind of a light weight haul.

How many arrested? Where will they be incarcerated? How many Mexican gov't officials arrested? The article didn't say.


User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9767 posts, RR: 27
Reply 2, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 1201 times:
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Quoting MDorBust (Thread starter):

Yeah, it's still a PITA to buy some cold medicine, and it's done nothing to combat Meth making.

Hmmm, so I guess that's why the Claritin I buy for my allergies is now behind the counter. Was wondering about that. I think they actually wrote my name down and everything.

~Vik



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineAirCop From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1198 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 1):
How many Mexican gov't officials arrested?

Might want to ponder how many US officials (i.e. customs.border patrol ) will end up (if any) get indicted. Common sense would tell me that size of operation would have some US people on the payroll.


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1191 times:

Quoting AirCop (Reply 3):
Might want to ponder how many US officials (i.e. customs.border patrol ) will end up (if any) get indicted. Common sense would tell me that size of operation would have some US people on the payroll.

The possibility exists. But it is not the "norm" in the US - IMO - to be "on the take". It is however, fairly well known, and publicized, that many of the Mexican Gov't (Border) officials are corrupt.

I would hope no US Border Patrol/Customs officials are implicated. I would also hope there are no Mexican officials implicated. I find the former more plausible than the latter.


User currently offlineAirCop From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1183 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 4):
I would hope no US Border Patrol/Customs officials are implicated.

While I agree, but living in a border state its rare for a month to go by without some Border Patrol officer getting him/herself in hot water.

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 4):
It is however, fairly well known, and publicized, that many of the Mexican Gov't (Border) officials are corrupt.

Two days in the paper was an article where the Aqua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico (border city just south of Douglas, AZ) police chief was gunned down while he was leaving his residence to go to work.


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1176 times:

Quoting AirCop (Reply 5):
Two days in the paper was an article where the Aqua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico (border city just south of Douglas, AZ) police chief was gunned down while he was leaving his residence to go to work.

I also read the El Paso paper a few times a month, there are always stories of incursions, and of Mexican officials trying to do the right thing, but winding up dead for their trouble. Who do you trust? Certainly a much more volatile environment for "the good guys" on the southern side of the border. I don't mean to imply there aren't competent, honest people on the Mexican side of the fence, there more certainly are. There are, IMO, just a hell of a lot less of them.

Quoting AirCop (Reply 5):
While I agree, but living in a border state its rare for a month to go by without some Border Patrol officer getting him/herself in hot water.

Unfortunate. The only thing that makes me more angry than a Soldier gone bad is a cop/commissioned official gone bad. You well know, since you were CHP, integrity above all else is essential in this line of work.


User currently offlineCaptOveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1161 times:

Quoting AirCop (Reply 3):
Common sense would tell me that size of operation would have some US people on the payroll.

Probably more than a few. I think starting pay for border patrol is around 30k a year. Lousy pay for work nobody really wants makes people easy to corrupt. It really only takes 1 corrupt officer to make a huge hole for drug traffic.


User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1150 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Thread starter):
Yeah, it's still a PITA to buy some cold medicine, and it's done nothing to combat Meth making.

It's put a lot of home cookers out of business here in farm country. I don't know how much cold medicine one person needs but I bought a thirty pack of sudafed at the drugstore-a year and a half ago-and I've maybe used half a dozen. At this rate it'll last me until I'm dead.

Anyway, what's the problem with signing the book and showing a driver's license?


User currently offlineMDorBust From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1146 times:

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 8):
Anyway, what's the problem with signing the book and showing a driver's license?

No problem with that... if it managed to work that well.

Last time I tried it was a quick stop in at a Wal-Mart in Buda, Tx while heading down to San Antonio. Yeah, that was a half hour of my life I want back. Yeah, I know it's incompetance on the part of the people doing the logging... but really, when I'm in such crappy physical condition that I'm buying medication, I'm not likely to be in the sort of mood to put up with morans.

My original point being, we may have put the home cookers out (which we were busy doing the boots on the ground way) but they just moved across the border where we can't touch them.


User currently offlineCaptOveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1144 times:

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 8):

Anyway, what's the problem with signing the book and showing a driver's license?

I hate to sound like the tin foil hat crowd.. But there is plenty wrong with having to sign a stupid book to buy cold medication. Why do I have to sign a book to indicate I have the sniffles? What if a future employer subpoenas those books to determine if I am too expensive to give health insurance? I know that is far fetched, but why couldn't it happen? Why surrender personal freedoms that we don't have to.

Just limit people to one pack per visit. That is enough of a pain in the ass. If the same person comes in 10 times that day for a pack of sudafed get the LP number from their car, and tip off the local po-po. I am sure their detectives would be interested in knowing about them.


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1140 times:

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 10):
I hate to sound like the tin foil hat crowd.. But there is plenty wrong with having to sign a stupid book to buy cold medication.

Well, I might agree and then I'd tell you to go find your nearest Meth dealer and smack him/her right in the mouth. You can blame them. No one else. Them.

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 10):
Just limit people to one pack per visit.

Five people, working together, go to Wal-Mart location A. Each buy 1 pack. Then to Wal-Mart location B. One pack each. Then to Walgreens Location A. One pack each once more. Then to . . . . you get the idea, right.

Sounds good in theory, doesn't work in practice. This was EXACTLY one tactic used by these scumbags, Clarence (CaptOveur - get it. Ha Ha Ha). Hence the rules we have now.


User currently offlineAa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3347 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1125 times:

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 10):

I hate to sound like the tin foil hat crowd.. But there is plenty wrong with having to sign a stupid book to buy cold medication. Why do I have to sign a book to indicate I have the sniffles? What if a future employer subpoenas those books to determine if I am too expensive to give health insurance? I know that is far fetched, but why couldn't it happen? Why surrender personal freedoms that we don't have to.

So what do you think of prescription only medication?

AAndrew


User currently offlineSearpqx From Netherlands, joined Jun 2000, 4343 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1107 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 9):
My original point being, we may have put the home cookers out (which we were busy doing the boots on the ground way) but they just moved across the border where we can't touch them.

I don't have the latest stats for actual meth usage, but I seem to remember it being down in general. However as pointed out, the real benefit has been the drastic reduction of home labs. Even if the volume has remained the same due to OTB traffic, eliminating the labs from our communities, along with their associated health and social problems, is a very significant gain.



"The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity"
User currently offlineCaptOveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 1088 times:

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 12):
So what do you think of prescription only medication?

that is protected by doctor-patient privilidge and who knows what else. Signing a book because it is corporate policy is likely not protected by anything.

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 11):
Five people, working together, go to Wal-Mart location A. Each buy 1 pack. Then to Wal-Mart location B. One pack each. Then to Walgreens Location A. One pack each once more. Then to

So what keeps the same people from going to walgreens and signing the book for 1 pack of medication? Then going to wal-mart, and so on and so on. Sounds like the same false sense of security without the privacy risks.

There is a simple solution to put the entire drug industry out of business in this country, but nobody wants to do it.. legalize it all and the dealers will be out of business overnight.


User currently offlineHalls120 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1085 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 1):
How many Mexican gov't officials arrested? The article didn't say.

Mexican goernment officials arrested? You're kiding, right?  rotfl 

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 6):
I also read the El Paso paper a few times a month, there are always stories of incursions, and of Mexican officials trying to do the right thing, but winding up dead for their trouble.

The problem in Mexican law enforcement is that there are more bad apples than honest cops, which means the honest ones suffer.

Part of the reason for this reality is that Mexico pays its cops a crappy wage. You get what you pay for....

Quoting Searpqx (Reply 13):
I don't have the latest stats for actual meth usage, but I seem to remember it being down in general. However as pointed out, the real benefit has been the drastic reduction of home labs. Even if the volume has remained the same due to OTB traffic, eliminating the labs from our communities, along with their associated health and social problems, is a very significant gain.

 checkmark 

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 14):
So what keeps the same people from going to walgreens and signing the book for 1 pack of medication? Then going to wal-mart, and so on and so on. Sounds like the same false sense of security without the privacy risks.

Because DEA can check the books. And if I was running a meth lab, I wouldn't want a record of my purchases.


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1077 times:

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 14):
So what keeps the same people from going to walgreens and signing the book for 1 pack of medication? Then going to wal-mart, and so on and so on. Sounds like the same false sense of security without the privacy risks.

Database.

Once the LEAs see a trend, they go have a look.

Meth usage/manufacture in this country has dropped. Partially because of the resitrictions in place on obtaining ephedrin.


User currently offlineGreasespot From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3078 posts, RR: 20
Reply 17, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1070 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 16):
Meth usage/manufacture in this country has dropped. Partially because of the resitrictions in place on obtaining ephedrin

Plus since they have moved it behind the counter it is not stolen as easily. I think mored than meth the drug stores were getting tired of having their entire supply of cold medicine ripped off every day.

I was told it takes a lot of cold medicine to make meth...So while they may be able to go buy it from a bunch of stores it is now work and they have to buy it.

Funny here the stats show that while actual meth use has gone down there are more hard core users than before. Plus there was a seizure of extasy in Ottawa area that was almost pure meth.

The drug units here are warning that there is a meth epidemic that is coming.

GS

GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
User currently offlineAirCop From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1069 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 16):

Meth usage/manufacture in this country has dropped.

Yes there seems to be less meth labs busts in the news.

Quoting Greasespot (Reply 17):
Funny here the stats show that while actual meth use has gone down there are more hard core users than before.

Based on personal experiences in Phoenix, it appears more females are the hard core users after the so called boy friends get them hooked.


User currently offlineCaptOveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1065 times:

Quoting Halls120 (Reply 15):
Because DEA can check the books. And if I was running a meth lab, I wouldn't want a record of my purchases.

And fake IDs are SOOO hard to get.


User currently offlineAa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3347 posts, RR: 8
Reply 20, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1060 times:

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 14):

that is protected by doctor-patient privilidge and who knows what else. Signing a book because it is corporate policy is likely not protected by anything.

On the last thread on this topic, a pharmacist from PA told me that all controlled substance sales are logged with the state attorney general. And in many states, your controlled substance prescription is filed away for five or ten years. And if there is a problem, they can look at it.

I'm not, personally, concerned with the state knowing I had a cold last September.

AAndrew


User currently offlineCaptoveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 1050 times:

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 20):
I'm not, personally, concerned with the state knowing I had a cold last September.

Neither am I.. It is the health insurance companies and employers that worry me.


User currently offlineADXMatt From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 950 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 1043 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Thread starter):
It's because of that restriction that makes making meth harder here in the United States, so, Mexican drug rings have seized that opportunity.

Thats all we need are more jobs going to foreign countries. Meth used to be made in the good ol US of A.

If the US Govt would just start taxing the stuff like cigarettes and liquor we might be able to get more money for education and treatment to get people off this stuff. The market would dry up, crime would go down etc.


User currently offlineHalls120 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1037 times:

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 19):
Quoting Halls120 (Reply 15):
Because DEA can check the books. And if I was running a meth lab, I wouldn't want a record of my purchases.

And fake IDs are SOOO hard to get.

Yes, the bad guys could get and use fake ID's. But those can be traced as well.

The bottom line is this - making pseudoephedrine harder to get has led to a concrete reduction in meth labs in the US. While much of the production may have shifted south of the border, the fact is, reduction of meth labs in the US is, if nothing else, elimination of a safety and health hazard to those living and working near those locations where meth was being cooked.

Let's see - do we want exploding meth labs killing and wounding neighbors, police and fire responders, or do want to have to ask the pharmacist (gasp - the indignity of it all) for meds that can be used in illegal activity?

Not a tough call, IMO.


User currently offlineSearpqx From Netherlands, joined Jun 2000, 4343 posts, RR: 10
Reply 24, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1023 times:

Quoting Halls120 (Reply 23):
do we want exploding meth labs killing and wounding neighbors, police and fire responders

Not to mention the related costs to society. At least in this neck of the woods, it seems that the home lab demographic was a 30somthing couple, unmarried, but with 2-4 infant to pre-teen children between them, and the woman was frequently pregnant. So besides the 'cooks', you had children in constant danger from exposure to harsh chemicals and explosions, that then had to be thrown into the foster care system. Want to guess their chances for a 'normal' life?

Quoting Halls120 (Reply 23):
Not a tough call, IMO.

Funny thing is, I'm one of those that is very concerned about the extent the gov't is looking into our private lives and tracking us, but in this one instance, I'm more than happy to support the intrusion.



"The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity"
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