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Portuguese Speakers: Whats The Difference?  
User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 993 times:

I'm learning Spanish right now. In the future once I gain fluency I want to try something else. The difference in Latin American and Spain Spanish is really not that difficult and everyone can understand each other from what I have seen at ORD and learned.
When it comes to the Portuguese language is there a major difference? If I go study in Portugal then a year later go on vacation in Brazil will I be lost in the translations? Yes at one point I was ignorant to the fact that Brazil's language was Portuguese and it had the largest speakers of it anywhere, 100 million I looked up compared to only 10 million in Portugal.

So my question is: is the difference between Brazilian and Portugal speakers varied greatly? Or have some people exaggerated greatly?

13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJAL777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 989 times:

I think it depends to whom you are speaking in Brazil. If its in a business or professional environtment, the languages are very similiar - they'll be a difference in accents though. However, I find great difficulty in understanding Brazilian slang. For example, I had to use the subtitles when watching City of God as I couldn't understand half of what they said.

User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 979 times:

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
When it comes to the Portuguese language is there a major difference?

I work for a Brazilian aircraft manufacture (?) and in my work I have been exposed to several of the crews from Brazil. Eager to learn, I have asked them to teach me some of the basics so I can communicate. Over the last few years I have learned enough so I can now hold my own with very basic communication when working. Several of my co-workers speak Spanish and some can translate and communicate, some can not. I was told a lot has to do with local slang and dialect on both sides.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 977 times:

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
So my question is: is the difference between Brazilian and Portugal speakers varied greatly?

From what I recall, it's probably more a difference in pronounciation and use of certain words, similar to the differences between Spanish from Spain and Spanish from the various countries in Latin America. There may be some cultural clashes though, as one time at work, a native Portuguese speaker from Portugal got bad scores on an evaluation because she wrote in Portuguese from Portugal, and not the "standard" Portuguese from Brazil. To make matters worse, the guy who made that evaluation wasn't even from Portugal or Brazil, much less a native Portuguese speaker (he was from Argentina).


User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 951 times:

I minored in Portuguese at uni; half my professors came from Portugal, the other half from Brazil...so I've been exposed to both dialects equally.

There are a lot of differences between Brazilian and Continental Portuguese; the accent is only the most obvious one. They use different vocabulary and grammatical structures as well. Obviously they're mutually intelligible; otherwise they couldn't be the same language. The difference is probably about the same as the diff. between American and European Spanish, or American and British English. Very close, but different enough to be occasionally confusing.

I will say this, though...Continental Portuguese is easier to pronounce, but Brazilian Portuguese is prettier.  bigthumbsup 


User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8668 posts, RR: 43
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 935 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 4):
They use different vocabulary and grammatical structures as well.

And of course, there are some vocab traps no one should fall in... but they usually discover those quickly! Big grin The grammar in Brazilian Portuguese is considerably easier, e.g. the second person is hardly ever used unless you live in certain regions where it's popular. As for accents, I have a very hard time understanding Portuguese from Portugal, it sounds very harsh to me and they seem to leave half the vowels out.

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 4):
Brazilian Portuguese is prettier.

Definitely! It has all the melody to it that the Portuguese version lacks.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineFlyingbabydoc From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 927 times:

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
is the difference between Brazilian and Portugal speakers varied greatly? Or have some people exaggerated greatly?

As a native speaker (I was born and raised in Brazil) I can tell you that yes, there is a difference. Quite significant, to the point that we have a hard time (sometimes) understanding Portuguese from Portugal when spoken very fast. Same goes to them. Of course there are lots of expressions and words that are NOT interchangeable (try calling a boy "puto" in Brazil the same way it is called in Portugal - you will be hit, for it is VERY offensive), but if you learn well in any country you will be able to use it without major problems in the other, provided you get used to the regional accents.

And yes, Brazilian Portuguese is 1000x nicer than the original.  duck 

Alex


User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 3906 posts, RR: 28
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 923 times:

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
When it comes to the Portuguese language is there a major difference? If I go study in Portugal then a year later go on vacation in Brazil will I be lost in the translations?

The difference is quite significant, probably more than British English vs American English, but we still manage to understand each other. Pronounciation is clearly different but most of the grammar is similar (we practically don't use gerund and there are differences in the formal/informal ways of addressing people - the "tu/você" conundrum - but that is basically it). Some vocabulary is different as well, and you can usually clearly tell in written Portuguese wether it is "continental" or Brazilian (the latter eliminate most of the silent letters).

If you have a good grasp of Portuguese from Portugal we will get around fine in Brazil but you may have some difficulty in getting understood. We here have a lot of Brazilian influences in the media and so for us it is easy to understand them but they are not as exposed to contemporary Portuguese culture, and so are not so used to hearing us speak.

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
100 million

I believe the population of Brasil is higher than that (around 180 million), and I would be surprised if many of those didn't speak Portuguese.

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 4):
I will say this, though...Continental Portuguese is easier to pronounce, but Brazilian Portuguese is prettier.

I won't dispute that Brazilian Portuguese is prettier but I don't think Continental Portuguese is easier to pronounce - it is much more common to find a non-native Portuguese speaker speak Brazilian Portuguese correctly than Continental Portuguese, which is notoriously difficult to pronounce (we tend to "eat" the final portion of the words).



Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 896 times:

Quoting Pyrex (Reply 7):
I won't dispute that Brazilian Portuguese is prettier but I don't think Continental Portuguese is easier to pronounce - it is much more common to find a non-native Portuguese speaker speak Brazilian Portuguese correctly than Continental Portuguese, which is notoriously difficult to pronounce (we tend to "eat" the final portion of the words).

Fair enough. I found it easier; Brazilian Portuguese is very sing-songy and I think far more nasal than Continental Portuguese; plus I found it difficult to tell when an R was an H and when it wasn't.  blush 


User currently offlineScarletHarlot From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 4673 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 876 times:

Quoting Pyrex (Reply 7):
we tend to "eat" the final portion of the words

I've noticed this with Mr. Harlot's family, and it carries over into their English - they tend to pronounce Toronto as "Toront", for example. Portuguese is a difficult language to pronounce if you did not learn it young - Mr. Harlot insists that I cannot pronounce "eu" (the word for I, I hope I spelled it properly).



But that was when I ruled the world
User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8927 posts, RR: 40
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 850 times:

Quoting Pyrex (Reply 7):

I believe the population of Brasil is higher than that (around 180 million), and I would be surprised if many of those didn't speak Portuguese.

184 million I believe. Just about everyone speaks Portuguese, with the exception of very few native tribes.



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineDETA737 From Portugal, joined Oct 2000, 612 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 804 times:

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 10):

I've noticed this with Mr. Harlot's family, and it carries over into their English - they tend to pronounce Toronto as "Toront", for example. Portuguese is a difficult language to pronounce if you did not learn it young - Mr. Harlot insists that I cannot pronounce "eu" (the word for I, I hope I spelled it properly).

I've noticed this with people from central Portugal, especially in the area around Lisbon. My family is from the Santarém area and I've noticed most of them leave the letter o off the end of words, for instance "carro" (car) is pronounced carre.

To answer the original question, Portuguese from Portugal and Brazil are different but once you get used to one variation you can quickly get the hang of the other one. My familiarity with the Brazilian dialect comes from Brazilian novelas and music. In these examples of pop culture you are able to really learn the differences, as I have read Brazilian history books etc., and the variations are much more slight.


User currently offlineTsaord From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 795 times:

I have not heard Portugal speakers before. But on youtube I heard Brazilians. At first I thought it was spanish but then it sounded like the woman who I think was a news caster speak as though she had a cold. Like her nose was stoped up lol. They were talking about a group there called "Antonia". I just like how it sounded.

Thanks for the replies so far.


User currently offlineBSBIsland From Brazil, joined Jul 2005, 376 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 784 times:

Quoting Tsaord (Thread starter):
is the difference between Brazilian and Portugal speakers varied greatly?

In my opinion pronounciation is quite different, but of course it's still the same language. I believe the Portuguese from Brazil is easier to learn and speak, as in Portugal people speak much faster. Once in Portugal I had sometimes some difficulties in understanding them. Written Portuguese is quite the same except for some grammar and vocabulary. The big diffrence is pronounciation and what I see is that Portuguese don't have any problems in understaning Brazilians but Brazilians sometimes can have these problems. I think a comparison that could be made is something like the difference in French from France and Quebec.


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