Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Cost Of Living In Europe  
User currently offlineRichPhitzwell From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3053 times:

Ive been skirting the idea of migrating east.

Would I have the same standard of living of $100,000 for a job that pays 100,000 euro, sterling etc when living in said country? Or is it more or less51,500 sterling in London is equivalent to $100,000 standard of living in NY?

33 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineEaglekeeper101 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 272 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3040 times:

The cost of living (in general terms) of living in England, given the income you mentioned, is roughly similar. However, the level of taxation here is outrageous compared to the US...

I am SO happy that the USAF is subsidizing my housing  Smile



"The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 2, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3022 times:

Quoting Eaglekeeper101 (Reply 1):
the level of taxation here is outrageous compared to the US...

he ought to move to the Channel Islands, Luxembourg or to Vaduz/Liechtenstein. Also the Canton of Zug in Switzerland, only 20kms from Zurich can be highly recommended. And these places not only offer low taxation for big earners/spenders but also otherwise are quite good.


User currently offlineRichPhitzwell From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3014 times:

What if I really like burritos and tacos and pizza and burgers and cheetos, oh god i love cheetos, and chinees, and fries, ya...would i be able to afford all that. oh and ice cream, and cherries, yum cherries

User currently offlineCxsjr From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 3004 times:

Whatever you do, steer clear of the UK .... it'll cost you a frigging fortune in airport & government taxes whenever you want to fly out of here, reportedly the most expensive in the world!

User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 5, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2999 times:

Quoting RichPhitzwell (Reply 3):
What if I really like burritos and tacos and pizza and burgers and cheetos, oh god i love cheetos, and chinees, and fries, ya...would i be able to afford all that. oh and ice cream, and cherries, yum cherries

you could have that in the Zurich area fairly easily. I mean lodgings in Zug and working place in Zurich. Shopping in Zug, Zurich, and in nearby Germany. And on some Saturdays a 1hr 30min drive to Mulhouse/F for shopping good wines at low prices. And Zug and Zurich have nice lakes where you can go swimming in summer. 1 hr from Zurich is Lucerne, 3 hrs away Geneva and 4 hrs away Milano.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 6, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2995 times:

Quoting Eaglekeeper101 (Reply 1):
However, the level of taxation here is outrageous compared to the US...

I remember reading somewhere (so don't ask me for details!) that overall personal taxation is actually higher in the US than the UK, just better hidden. Not sure how that's worked out.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineBCNGRO From Andorra, joined Oct 2004, 584 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2984 times:

I don't know how it is in the US, but in Europe you would have a pretty high standard of living with a 100.000€ job. The problem I guess is finding such a job.  Smile Average salary must be something like 30.000€ in Europe, so please tell me if you find a job that pays 100.000  Wink.

Plus you have to take into account that in most countries almost half of it would go in taxes.So even if you got to find a job that pays 100.000€ government would take 40-50.000 from your salary so eventually you would have to live with 50.000-60.000€ (although you would have many more public services than in the US, free health care, etc)

Also think we don't have "free" gasoline like in the US. It's more than 1€ per litre here, so you would have to get used to public transportation unless you are willing to spend a large part of your salary in gas stations.

Quoting RichPhitzwell (Reply 3):
What if I really like burritos and tacos and pizza and burgers and cheetos, oh god i love cheetos, and chinees, and fries, ya...would i be able to afford all that. oh and ice cream, and cherries, yum cherries

Then you are screwed, man.

Just kidding, you would find them all here, although probably in more expensive prices and smaller portions.



At the bus station, buses stop. At the train station, trains stop. At my desk, I have a work station.
User currently offlineBeaucaire From Syria, joined Sep 2003, 5252 posts, RR: 24
Reply 8, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2983 times:

I know lot's of people here in France who actually leave the country( and Europe..) because it's a permanent rip-off..
Taxation is outragous on many levels- housing and property taxes ( I pay 3,900 € property tax on a renovated farmhouse in France ,PLUS 1,800 € housing tax !!!!!) I call this legalized Magia methods by the regional goverments.
The state has never enough here- consider if you buy a house,you have to pay at the moment of purchase,the purchase tax (level of about 7 % of the value of the house..) - if for any reason you re-sell the house in a couple of years,you'll be taxed on the potential added value (26 % of that value ) and the new buyer -of course -pays another time 7 % purchase tax on the same house.
Income taxes are quite high in Europe as compared to the USA. Food is in general more expensive,restaurants,clothing,energy (petrol,gas..),cars... the list goes on and on.
I met a man yesterday in Montpellier who used to work for Airbus - he will leave France to settle in Argentina.
Another couple we know will go to Mexico and open a restaurant.Still others (couple of teachers ) will join her daughter in Vietnam..
I work in real-estate here and at least 10 % of the sellers here in my region are considering leaving France.
So consider twice..!!



Please respect animals - don't eat them...
User currently offlineRayPettit From United Kingdom, joined May 2002, 608 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2949 times:

Its not all about £££, it's about the quality of life. If you are looking at jobs in the region of $100,000, then you should not be poor and so not should worry about money too much - Europe is much more diverse and less materialistic than the US in my opinion.

If you come to the UK, we will get commercial-free TV, a familiar language, great scenery, great city nightlife, great women, better city public transport and easy access to other European destinations.


User currently offline767Lover From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2932 times:

Quoting RayPettit (Reply 9):
Europe is less materialistic

You've never met my relatives then....


User currently offlineEaglekeeper101 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 272 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2929 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 6):
I remember reading somewhere (so don't ask me for details!) that overall personal taxation is actually higher in the US than the UK, just better hidden. Not sure how that's worked out.

For some strange reason, it wouldn't surprise me if you were correct...



"The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineRichPhitzwell From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2896 times:

Please dont get caught up on the dollar amount. What Im trying to figure out is what amount is equivalent for quality of life.

lets say someone makes $50,000 in NY or $30,000 in NY. Would that person have to make 50,000 sterling in London or $50,000 euro in Dublin to be equivalent?

OR does the person have to make $50,000 - whatever corresponding exchange rate would be.

OR does the person need to make lets say 60,000 sterling to be equivalent to $50,000 in NY?

Make sense? Does anybody have a rough idea?


User currently offlineBCNGRO From Andorra, joined Oct 2004, 584 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2877 times:

Quoting RichPhitzwell (Reply 12):
Please dont get caught up on the dollar amount. What Im trying to figure out is what amount is equivalent for quality of life.

lets say someone makes $50,000 in NY or $30,000 in NY. Would that person have to make 50,000 sterling in London or $50,000 euro in Dublin to be equivalent?

OR does the person have to make $50,000 - whatever corresponding exchange rate would be.

OR does the person need to make lets say 60,000 sterling to be equivalent to $50,000 in NY?

Make sense? Does anybody have a rough idea?

I think you are mixing up several things here. First is currency: $50.000 is roughly €40.000, which is roughly £25.000-30.000 pounds. And that's independent from quality of life. If you make $50.000 in the states, those are the amounts you would make in Europe.

Now a different thing is what you can make with that money. Here is where the concept "quality of life" comes into play. It all depens on what "quality of life" means for you. If it means purchasing power then it's definitely lower in Europe than in the US (specially because of taxation). I'm no expert but I guess you would have to make some more money here to have the same purchasing power as in the states (maybe 25-50% more). Now "quality of life" can have other meanings such as social welfare, good health care, efficent public transportation, etc. And those are things which, I think, work much better in Europe.

So to sum up: it all depends on your priorities and what quality of life is for you. If it's just purchasing power then, yes, it's quite lower in Europe.

[Edited 2007-03-19 16:34:47]


At the bus station, buses stop. At the train station, trains stop. At my desk, I have a work station.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2856 times:

Quoting RichPhitzwell (Thread starter):
Ive been skirting the idea of migrating east.

Would I have the same standard of living of $100,000 for a job that pays 100,000 euro, sterling etc when living in said country? Or is it more or less51,500 sterling in London is equivalent to $100,000 standard of living in NY?

If you made $100,000 in the US you could probably forget about making 100k GBP per year, or even 50k GBP per year. Your salary won't be equivalent; unless you're a whiz in financial services, you'll probably take a pay cut of at least 1/4 to 1/3 of your yearly salary in the US. Every American I've ever known who moved to the UK, with the exception of two investment bankers, have had the same experience. In some professions your pay cut will be even bigger; a nurse I talked to who moved here was making $80k in the USA and is making 23k GBP here, which is about 44-45k USD at today's exchange rates....nearly FIFTY PERCENT LESS than what she made in the US, and the cost of living is MUCH higher here.

In a nutshell...if you're making $100k in the US, for god's sake stay where you are unless you're willing to give up tens of thousands of dollars to live in Europe.

London is also much more expensive than New York. MUCH MORE. If the index in NYC is 100, in London it's probably 130-140. Plus, it has been my experience that the British can be quite hostile to Americans.

My advice would be to not move to Europe. I've lived abroad for six years and there is not a day that goes by that I do not regret my decision.


User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2848 times:

Quoting ME AVN FAN (Reply 2):
he ought to move to the Channel Islands, Luxembourg or to Vaduz/Liechtenstein. Also the Canton of Zug in Switzerland, only 20kms from Zurich can be highly recommended. And these places not only offer low taxation for big earners/spenders but also otherwise are quite good.

You have to have a few million in the bank before you can buy property in Jersey. I don't know how it works in Guernsey but it wouldn't surprise me if it were the same.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 16, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2813 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 14):
I've lived abroad for six years and there is not a day that goes by that I do not regret my decision.

There's not a day goes by that you fail to tell us about it either.  Yeah sure



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineBrons2 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3017 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2809 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 14):
Plus, it has been my experience that the British can be quite hostile to Americans.

I haven't encountered this at all in my travels.

I get a lot of curious questions about George Dubya Bush, but that's about it.



Firings, if well done, are good for employee morale.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2799 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 16):
There's not a day goes by that you fail to tell us about it either. Yeah sure

Sorry if it upsets you, but I'm just being honest.

Quoting Brons2 (Reply 17):
I haven't encountered this at all in my travels.

I get a lot of curious questions about George Dubya Bush, but that's about it.

You've been lucky then; I was spit on during an anti-war protest simply for being American. I was and am against the Iraq War.


User currently offlineCairo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2799 times:

I'm from Dallas, and have lived in London, Lille and Cairo, and spent a lot of medium term assignments throughout Europe.

More or less, $100 000 USD spends a lot like 100 000 GBP or 100 000 Euros in a lot of practical ways.

For instance, a beer in most of America can be had for 3 dollars, a beer in London can be had for 3 pounds, and a beer in Amsterdam can be had for 3 euros --- or a little less in all 3 cases when you get outside of tourist areas. (the same is true for rent, or food, or cab fare, et...)

Even though the exchange rates make the euro and especially the pound more valuable on a direct exchange basis, they actually buy a similar amount in their respective regions. So, generally speaking, yes, a 100 000 / year job generally will purchase the same standard of living in all 3 major currencies. There is a big difference between London and Newcastle, as there is between New York and Nashville, so keep that in mind also.

Quoting RayPettit (Reply 9):
If you come to the UK, we will get commercial-free TV, a familiar language, great scenery, great city nightlife, great women, better city public transport and easy access to other European destinations.

I love the UK! but, some of your statements need to be put in context to America and the EU
1. In the UK, TV is 5 channels, maybe 30 with a complete cable/satellite package; in the US 100 - 200 TV channels are available in most homes, the majority of which have cable
2. great scenery, perhaps, but great weather, no
3. nightlife and women, I'm sorry, IMO is not better in the UK versus USA or Europe - other EU cities certainly have better nightlife
4. better public transport - definitely, as in all of Europe, easy access to all of Europe - definately

...all of which brings up a huge point.

They have different social values in the UK and Europe, which means you get comprehensive public transport, free healthcare, at least 28 days off per year, and other benefits, BUT, you also get
....much smaller housing, more crowds, less consumer choice in the stores, a strong social safety net, a bigger role for government, and less flexibility to innovate and start a business (compared to the US).

As usual in the EU v. USA discussion, it is just two different approaches to running a society, neither is right or wrong, but both better serve the goals and values of their population.

Cairo


User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2793 times:

Quoting Cairo (Reply 19):

I love the UK! but, some of your statements need to be put in context to America and the EU
1. In the UK, TV is 5 channels, maybe 30 with a complete cable/satellite package; in the US 100 - 200 TV channels are available in most homes, the majority of which have cable

The BBC is the only ad-free network. That needs to be made clear. The BBC has 2 terrestrial channels, 2 freeview channels, a news station, and some crap childrens' stations. The rest are wall-to-wall ads, all day long; some of them have more ads than American stations.

Cable is not available where I live so you're stuck with Sky (which we have) or freeview (which is crap).

Quote:

2. great scenery, perhaps, but great weather, no

Depends on where you live. York is pretty enough, but if you live in some places your view will be of illiterate scrawlings on walls, empty takeaway packets and beer cans, and crisp packets wafting on the breeze. The weather in the UK is rubbish...cold and rainy much of the year.

Quote:

3. nightlife and women, I'm sorry, IMO is not better in the UK versus USA or Europe - other EU cities certainly have better nightlife

Nightlife in York generally involves getting wasted, then having a slash up a wall. Or throwing up.

Quote:

4. better public transport - definitely, as in all of Europe, easy access to all of Europe - definately

Again, depends on where you live. Public transport in this part of the UK is rubbish. In London it's very good, but also extremely overpriced compared to transport in New York or even Paris. It's also extremely crowded, and if smelling someone's armpit all the way home is what turns you on, then by all means take the tube at rush hour.  yes 

Quote:

...all of which brings up a huge point.

They have different social values in the UK and Europe, which means you get comprehensive public transport, free healthcare, at least 28 days off per year, and other benefits, BUT, you also get

Ehhhh....depends. I have never gotten 28 days off a year....ever. Many companies start you off with 20 or even less, and if you work contract or temp, which more and more jobs are nowadays, you often get no holidays at all. The healthcare, while 'free', is good for acute problems but often fails people when it comes to chronic conditions. Also, if your PCT is having financial problems, you could wait for months for minor surgery to resolve painful conditions or even to see a specialist, and you end up going private which costs a lot of money out of pocket. I give the NHS pretty low marks overall, and NHS dentists are practically a myth. There are none around here who will accept new patients, so you go private for that and it is ridiculously expensive.

Quote:

....much smaller housing, more crowds, less consumer choice in the stores, a strong social safety net, a bigger role for government, and less flexibility to innovate and start a business (compared to the US).

I agree with all of that except for the strong social safety net; the UK allows welfare as a lifestyle but the benefits are very stingy. The deprivation has to be seen to be believed.

Quote:

As usual in the EU v. USA discussion, it is just two different approaches to running a society, neither is right or wrong, but both better serve the goals and values of their population.

Cairo

Ehhh...I think there are a lot of things wrong with the UK, and a lot of things they could do to improve things. Sometimes things are just plain wrong. The US isn't perfect, but the UK has a lot of shortcomings. It is by no means perfect, a socialist utopia, or even (for some people) a safe place to live. Crime shouldn't be underestimated either; you're less likely to be shot, but you're more likely to have your house robbed or your car stolen. I had to move to the UK to become a victim of crime, and I know a few people who have been attacked and beaten so badly they had to spend time in the hospital. None of their attackers were ever caught. One of the people who was attacked and beaten still has reconstructive surgery to go, but our PCT is basically broke so he won't get it anytime soon. He's unemployed at the moment and he can't go to job interviews looking like he does now, so the NHS is screwing him out of a job for the moment as well.

Woooooo!


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 21, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2787 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 18):
Sorry if it upsets you, but I'm just being honest.

Doesn't upset me in the slightest, I really couldn't care less. But the more I read your constant complaining about things the less surprised I am that you've had such a bad time.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2782 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 21):
Doesn't upset me in the slightest, I really couldn't care less. But the more I read your constant complaining about things the less surprised I am that you've had such a bad time.

Eh...well, you don't really know me or what I've been through here. I should add that when I came here in 2001, it was because I wanted to and I was optimistic about having a good life here. Didn't take long for the shine to come off, tho.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 23, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2778 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 22):
Eh...well, you don't really know me or what I've been through here

No, of course not - which is why I wouldn't dream of saying you are wrong, or a liar or anything like that. Some people have a great time, some people don't. It's just that you've mentioned how hideous it all is here in every other post you've written. Do you not think we might have got the message by now?



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 24, posted (7 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2767 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 15):
he ought to move to the Channel Islands, Luxembourg or to Vaduz/Liechtenstein. Also the Canton of Zug in Switzerland, only 20kms from Zurich can be highly recommended. And these places not only offer low taxation for big earners/spenders but also otherwise are quite good.
--
You have to have a few million in the bank before you can buy property in Jersey. I don't know how it works in Guernsey but it wouldn't surprise me if it were the same.

-
People who earn 100'000 Dollars per year often have a few millions in the bank ! But you do NOT need to have ANY million to take up lodgings in Zug/Switzerland, the problem rather will be the permission to stay and to work.
-


25 Post contains images Brons2 : Well maybe you should be a bit more incognito then I try to blend in as much as I can when I'm overseas, however, it can be difficult when you're 6'7
26 ME AVN FAN : in metrics it would be 1.83 plus -.18 = in total 2.01 meters ?!?! while I am 1.70 .............................. -
27 767Lover : Is it possible to even get a job as an expat anyway? I thought most of Europe was tightening the immigration laws and work visas....
28 NoUFO : While it is possible it's indeed very difficult for people from outside the European Union (or member states of the Schengen Agreement, don't know fo
29 Post contains images Brons2 : Yeap that is correct, 2 meters tall. Flying on airplanes can be uncomfortable without an exit row. Fortunately, after begging/crying/finagaling/whate
30 Post contains images Banco : For those of us in Britain, you're 6'7". Relax.
31 Post contains images PlymSpotter : The system is essentially the same in both the crown dependencies of Jersey and Guernsey; immigration to the islands is very difficult with only thos
32 Post contains images Rammstein : Holy s*** seems like Europe is hell!
33 Disruptivehair : All I did was speak. Unlike Madonna and Gwyneth Paltrow, I'm not ashamed of being American and I make no effort to conceal my accent. Why should I? Y
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Cost Of Living In Cyyc posted Mon Jun 12 2006 06:38:28 by AC_A340
Cost Of Living In Atlanta posted Tue Mar 21 2006 17:42:07 by Komododx
Questions About Life/cost Of Living In London posted Sat Mar 4 2006 19:21:29 by B727
Cost Of Living In Lucerne Switzerland posted Tue Jan 24 2006 21:17:49 by L-188
Cost Of Living In Your Hometown posted Thu Dec 29 2005 18:54:13 by TACAA320
Cost Of Living In Australia? posted Wed Nov 16 2005 18:58:13 by BCAInfoSys
The Joys Of Living In Minnesota (pics) posted Sat Mar 19 2005 03:06:10 by KaiGywer
Cost Of Taxi In New York posted Mon Nov 8 2004 15:44:14 by British767
The Cost Of War In Iraq posted Wed Jun 2 2004 14:04:05 by Flying-Tiger
History Of Terrorism In Europe And US... posted Fri Feb 7 2003 18:18:37 by 747-451