Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
We Got An Offer, But....  
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 1979 times:

Our house is on for £185,000 and we were just offered £170,000. The estate agent thinks she can get the offer higher but I've never sold a ho use before and I'm not sure what to do. I don't want to mess this up but £170k is just too low.

81 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 1, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 1977 times:

Turn it around the other way: If you were buying somewhere, would your first offer be what you were actually prepared to pay?


She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineLH526 From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 2381 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 1959 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting Disruptivehair (Thread starter):

You read "freakonomics" by Steven Levitt? Your estate agent might think it's less work to sell your house for 170k than keep it in her portfolio for another 5 weeks keeping her busy and in he end costing her money, she rather likes to sell it now instead of selling it in the future for 185k ... she will loose very few money, say, 1.000 but it will keep her free for other work during the next week so the advanteage of her free time (she can sped on other sales) is way more worthy than the 1000 she just lost.
There might be sellers in the future ofering 185k or even more ... it just might be the case that your agent / broker is tired of the project.

Mario
LH526

[Edited 2007-04-03 13:22:18]


Trittst im Morgenrot daher, seh ich dich im Strahlenmeer ...
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1928 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 1):
Turn it around the other way: If you were buying somewhere, would your first offer be what you were actually prepared to pay?

Lord no.

Quoting LH526 (Reply 2):
You read "freakonomics" by Steven Levitt? Your estate agent might think it's less work to sell your house for 170k than keep it in her portfolio for another 5 weeks keeping her busy and in he end costing her money, she rather likes to sell it now instead of selling it in the future for 185k ... she will loose very few money, say, 1.000 but it will keep her free for other work during the next week so the advanteage of her free time (she can sped on other sales) is way more worthy than the 1000 she just lost.
There might be sellers in the future ofering 185k or even more ... it just might be the case that your agent / broker is tired of the project.

I read that book but UK estate agents get such low commissions that I'm not sure the logic applies...US ones get 5-7% and over here they get less than half that.


User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13195 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1891 times:

I suspect that in the UK, much like some areas of the USA, there was a huge run up in the prices of houses due to pent up demand and reasonably low rates of interest, but it now ending.
Two problems here in the USA (and possibly there in the UK) causing the leveling off and decline in prices may be at play here too. One, is that some bought homes with adjustable interest rates in the early years, and they couldn't afford the higher rates when they bumped up to normal rates. Second, was higher risk homebuyers, getting a 'subprime' mortgage, that is with a lower or tiny down payment and higher than normal mortgage interest rates and defaulting when cannot affrord that mortgage payments as over their heads, lost their jobs or had pay cuts. You also have people that have lost their jobs and cannot afford the mortgage anymore.
I would also note that probably the most desirable and reasonalbly priced homes will still go up, but some older or less desirable homes or in less desirable locations will probably decline. That is part of the real estate cycles.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 5, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1885 times:

Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 5):
I suspect that in the UK, much like some areas of the USA, there was a huge run up in the prices of houses due to pent up demand and reasonably low rates of interest, but it now ending

Nope. Housing boom has been going for 15 years now and is showing little sign of either slowing down or going pop. Ultimately, there is a shortage of housing, so the prices just carry on going up, though with more equalisation across the country than there was.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1880 times:

Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 5):
I suspect that in the UK, much like some areas of the USA, there was a huge run up in the prices of houses due to pent up demand and reasonably low rates of interest, but it now ending.
Two problems here in the USA (and possibly there in the UK) causing the leveling off and decline in prices may be at play here too. One, is that some bought homes with adjustable interest rates in the early years, and they couldn't afford the higher rates when they bumped up to normal rates. Second, was higher risk homebuyers, getting a 'subprime' mortgage, that is with a lower or tiny down payment and higher than normal mortgage interest rates and defaulting when cannot affrord that mortgage payments as over their heads, lost their jobs or had pay cuts. You also have people that have lost their jobs and cannot afford the mortgage anymore.
I would also note that probably the most desirable and reasonalbly priced homes will still go up, but some older or less desirable homes or in less desirable locations will probably decline. That is part of the real estate cycles.

The run-up in house prices here started before it did in the US and house price inflation is still going fairly strong; last year York's house prices rose by 10-11%. There's still a lot of pressure on the housing stock here that doesn't exist in many parts of the US; this country is about the size of Iowa but has 60 million people living here, and that puts a massive amount of pressure on housing stock. There aren't enough houses to go around (in theory) and that pushes up prices; also there's just not enough available land to build a house for everyone who wants one. Population growth in the UK is still pretty strong and that's acting to push up prices, plus the economy is still doing well (no recessions in the last 10 years). All of those act as upward pressure on house prices.

I've never heard of a subprime mortgage market here; it must exist since British people can have credit problems just like Americans can, but it was ridiculously easy to get credit here at a very competitive interest rate. Fixed-rate 25-30 year mortgages are exotic here; most mortgages in this country have a fixed rate for a short period of time, then they readjust with interest rates. That's the dreaded ARM in the US, which is still considered to be an "exotic" mortgage but is the norm here. Repos and bankruptcies here are on the rise, but the conditions that caused the house price crash here in the early 1990s don't exist here; there's no recession, unemployment is pretty low, and interest rates are nowhere near as high as they were back then. I don't see a crash; I see house price inflation slowing down and leveling off instead of declining due to the pressure on the housing stock. I'm definitely no expert tho; that's just my lightly informed opinion!


User currently offlineBHXFAOTIPYYC From Portugal, joined Jun 2005, 1644 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1880 times:

Convert it back to USD - that's a third of a million bucks - then you'll feel better !!

Who valued it at 185 in the first place? Is 170 closer to it's real value? What are similar houses in the area going for? Are they selling, or has the "for sale" board been up for months? Can you meet the buyer somewhere in the middle? Do you have somewhere to go that you might loose if you don't hurry up and move? All these points to consider I suppose.



Breakfast in BHX, lunch in FAO, dinner in TIP, baggage in YYC.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1876 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 6):
Nope. Housing boom has been going for 15 years now and is showing little sign of either slowing down or going pop. Ultimately, there is a shortage of housing, so the prices just carry on going up, though with more equalisation across the country than there was.

I heard that house price inflation in Northern Ireland was in the 40-50% range. YIKES!


User currently offlineBHXFAOTIPYYC From Portugal, joined Jun 2005, 1644 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1871 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 9):
I heard that house price inflation in Northern Ireland was in the 40-50% range. YIKES!

I'm guessing though NI had 30 years of catching up to do.



Breakfast in BHX, lunch in FAO, dinner in TIP, baggage in YYC.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1863 times:

Quoting BHXFAOTIPYYC (Reply 8):
Convert it back to USD - that's a third of a million bucks - then you'll feel better !!

Who valued it at 185 in the first place? Is 170 closer to it's real value? What are similar houses in the area going for? Are they selling, or has the "for sale" board been up for months? Can you meet the buyer somewhere in the middle? Do you have somewhere to go that you might loose if you don't hurry up and move? All these points to consider I suppose.

Other houses in the neighborhood seem to be moving relatively quickly, but some of them are stuck on the market in the £195,000 range; there's one five bed house on at £289,950 and it is by over £50,000 the highest-priced house on the estate, so I don't anticipate that one selling anytime soon.

Ours is a 4-bed house with a giant kitchen and 2 bathrooms; other houses that have sold for £175,000-£190,000 (and that's selling price, not asking price) were 3 beds, 1 bath, small kitchen. So...I think our house is actually undervalued.

I've instructed the estate agent to try to negotiate a higher price; we would take £175,000 if they offer it. We have no onward chain but we're trying to relocate to the US so we'd like to be out of limbo at some point.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 11, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1863 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 9):
I heard that house price inflation in Northern Ireland was in the 40-50% range. YIKES!

From a very low base though. I mean, who would have wanted to move to Northern Ireland 15 years ago?

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 7):
Fixed-rate 25-30 year mortgages are exotic here

Yes, they're pretty much only just coming in. Part of that was that until comparatively recently, Britain didn't have an economy that could be viewed as stable for the foreseeable future. Now, even though you might have good and ba periods in it, lenders feel sufficiently confident to be able to fix over such a long period of time. Imagine doing that in the late eighties/early nineties when interest rates veered from 8% to 17.5% and back again. Still, there are some decent 25 year fixed rates around. Personally, I'm on that variable rate that horrifies so many people!



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1852 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 12):
From a very low base though. I mean, who would have wanted to move to Northern Ireland 15 years ago?

True, true. I wonder how much of that is actually from the BTL market?

Quoting Banco (Reply 12):
Yes, they're pretty much only just coming in. Part of that was that until comparatively recently, Britain didn't have an economy that could be viewed as stable for the foreseeable future. Now, even though you might have good and ba periods in it, lenders feel sufficiently confident to be able to fix over such a long period of time. Imagine doing that in the late eighties/early nineties when interest rates veered from 8% to 17.5% and back again. Still, there are some decent 25 year fixed rates around. Personally, I'm on that variable rate that horrifies so many people!

So are we, and our mortgage payment has rocketed up by about £150 a month over the last few years.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 13, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1847 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 11):
Ours is a 4-bed house with a giant kitchen and 2 bathrooms; other houses that have sold for £175,000-£190,000

Really? That's incredibly cheap, actually.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1844 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 14):
Really? That's incredibly cheap, actually.

I thought so too. Houses on our estate don't go for much more since they have small gardens and are 1960s semis, so they're not the roomiest houses around. They're bigger than the brand-new houses though; I don't see how anyone lives in those houses. They are ridiculously tiny!

Yep, it's cheap(er) up north.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 15, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1826 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 15):
Yep, it's cheap(er) up north.

Less than half the price compared to where I live, which isn't just cheap, it's extraordinary. York is hardly inner city slum country.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1820 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 16):
Less than half the price compared to where I live, which isn't just cheap, it's extraordinary. York is hardly inner city slum country.

Nope, it isn't...but jobs aren't exactly heavy on the ground here either, and wages in York are low. Then again, we'd have less in our pockets if we lived in London because even though we'd make more money, the increase in the cost of living would gobble the increase up and then some. Plus we'd never be able to afford a house. To get a decent career you have to go to the big city, but big city life in the UK is so outrageously expensive that it scares people away. Can't win, don't try, might as well emigrate.


User currently offlineLegoguy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 3314 posts, RR: 39
Reply 17, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1820 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 9):
I heard that house price inflation in Northern Ireland was in the 40-50% range. YIKES!

Sadily yes. I think my parents bought the house for £17000 and its now worth around £250000... not good for first time house buyers!  Sad



Can you say 'Beer Can' without sounding like a Jamaican saying 'Bacon'?
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1811 times:

Quoting Legoguy (Reply 18):
Sadily yes. I think my parents bought the house for £17000 and its now worth around £250000... not good for first time house buyers!

I'm glad we're not first-time buyers now; within a year of buying our house we were priced out of our neighborhood. If we'd bought our house 3 years earlier we'd have paid £75,000 for it. We paid £110,000 for it in 2001.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 19, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1811 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 17):
To get a decent career you have to go to the big city

Nah. I don't work in the city; well not much, anyway, and I live in the countryside too. It's just a question of income matching expense, that's all. Not everyone round here is an investment banker.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineLegoguy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 3314 posts, RR: 39
Reply 20, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1805 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 19):
I'm glad we're not first-time buyers now; within a year of buying our house we were priced out of our neighborhood. If we'd bought our house 3 years earlier we'd have paid £75,000 for it. We paid £110,000 for it in 2001.

Thinds are getting totally out of hand now. Alot more people will end up staying with their parents until they can land on their own two feet in the property market, me included!



Can you say 'Beer Can' without sounding like a Jamaican saying 'Bacon'?
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1805 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 20):
Nah. I don't work in the city; well not much, anyway, and I live in the countryside too. It's just a question of income matching expense, that's all. Not everyone round here is an investment banker.

We work in I.T., and we're lucky to both have jobs in the same city where we live. I know people who commute here from as far away as Middlesborough, Sheffield, Huddersfield, and Lincoln. That's QUITE a distance. I commuted between York and Harrogate for 3 years; it was miserable and those places are only 30 miles apart as the crow flies. The commute itself took 1.5 hours each way; I got sick to death of it.

If you want to advance an I.T. career, you have to go where the jobs are...and there's just not a lot of I.T. work in the north. Hence, you often have to go south and in doing so you incur a massive rise in living expenses.


User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1799 times:

Quoting Legoguy (Reply 21):
Thinds are getting totally out of hand now. Alot more people will end up staying with their parents until they can land on their own two feet in the property market, me included!

I think part of the problem is that the British seem to regard themselves as failures if they don't own property by their mid-20s. In Texas we thought single people in their 20s were crazy if they bought houses. The renting culture here just isn't strong. When I first started out I couldn't have afforded a mortgage and the thought of buying a house never crossed my mind; I figured it was something I'd do when I was older and earning more money. The average age of a first-time buyer in the US is over 30; some couples wait to buy a house until they've had (or are having) a baby; and there's not really any shame in that, or living in an apartment or rented house. It's just normal for people that age.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 23, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1788 times:

Quoting Disruptivehair (Reply 23):
The renting culture here just isn't strong.

Because if you rent you're essentially throwing the money away to someone else. And since houses prices are rising, there's a feeling that the more you delay, the more you're going to have to pay out when you DO buy. But the private rental market has grown dramatically recently, as more and more people find purchasing out of reach.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineDisruptivehair From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1787 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 24):
Because if you rent you're essentially throwing the money away to someone else. And since houses prices are rising, there's a feeling that the more you delay, the more you're going to have to pay out when you DO buy. But the private rental market has grown dramatically recently, as more and more people find purchasing out of reach.

Yes, that's true; but I never saw the point of a single person in their 20s buying a house. It just doesn't make sense to me. Renting is just what a lot of young people do in the US, and it's usually cheaper than owning a house.


25 Banco : Only if you share. Otherwise the rent is around the same as a mortgage, in which case why do so? At least, if you CAN get on the housing ladder. Stil
26 Disruptivehair : My rent in Texas was $600 a month; that would have been cheaper than a mortgage, plus I didn't have to pay for any repairs to the plumbing, electrici
27 Go3Team : You're complaining? That's a hell of an investment. Unless, every buyer, is a first time buyer. Things in California are about the same way. My grand
28 Disruptivehair : I think he's complaining about having to buy a house in a market like this; first-time buyers are priced out of many areas in the UK.
29 Go3Team : Ahhh, ok. Things can't stay that way for long. If no one has the money to buy it, then one has to adjust the price to sell it.
30 Luv2fly : One word, counter offer and see what the people come back with.
31 Disruptivehair : We did; we want to get them between 175k and 180k. I'd be happy with 175k and the estate agent seems optimistic that she can get them to increase the
32 Post contains images Skidmarks : DH, we also had an offer on our place yesterday. It's on for £214,500 and a developer offered £205,000. We said no for several reasons. One, it's to
33 Disruptivehair : I think that house price inflation will probably taper off but I don't see a plunge in prices because the market conditions just aren't right for it
34 Disruptivehair : We used to have a time constraint, but my husband went to NYC last week and had his temporary IR1 visa endorsed, so it now serves as his green card f
35 747438 : Does this mean you are leaving? I do hope so
36 Civjetfan : go with a different agency one that is experienced
37 Banco : Only in the very long term. House inflation doesn't affect those already in the property market to anything like the same level, as their existing pr
38 Post contains images Legoguy : No, I'm happy my parents have made alot out of it, but for us people trying to land on our own two feet, it's quite an up hill battle. However I don'
39 Disruptivehair : I can see the point you're making...that's one side of the story...but have you seen the housepricecrash.co.uk site?
40 Banco : Of course. If these things were easily predictable everyone would make efforts to avoid it!
41 Post contains images Disruptivehair : It's all just educated guesses; that's what makes it interesting. We have a second viewing tomorrow with a couple who saw the house on Saturday; mayb
42 Post contains images Disruptivehair : We heard back from the people who made the offer; apparently they genuinely thought we would take £170k and are saying they might not be able to affo
43 AndesSMF : It has ended, and the downhill period is only just beginning. I have seen houses that sold for $350K now sit on the market for $285 or less. So what
44 Disruptivehair : You can't compare the US market to the UK market though; the culture, conditions, pressures, etc. are completely different. There's no comparison. Pl
45 AndesSMF : I have read plenty of areas that discounted trouble on the statement that they were 'different'. In 2005, there were calls in the US that there would
46 Disruptivehair : Andes, I'm not going to argue about the state of the US housing market; we all know it's not good. However, you can't take all of those same assumpti
47 Banco : The UK does not have a stagnant or decreasing population. It has an increasing one, as the recent passing of 60 million population rather graphically
48 AndesSMF : But what I am telling you is that the assumptions that experts have made have been wrong, and that this is a global economy. In other words, who is b
49 Disruptivehair : Like I said, the UK market is a completely different animal and I'm not going to have this argument.
50 Banco : That's complete nonsense. All free markets will follow similar trends, but a housing market is skewed in a million different ways. Try comparing Brit
51 Post contains links and images AndesSMF : You sure? "The UK has an ageing population. This is the result of declines both in fertility rates and in the mortality rate. This has led to a decli
52 Post contains images Jush : Every house is in England at least from my experience. The thing is that in most towns at least in the South West everyony has these old style Victor
53 Disruptivehair : Victorian houses are often larger than the new ones. They're the smallest I've ever seen. One had a bedroom that was 5 feet by 4 feet...too small for
54 Banco : You're the one that said, and I quote "stagnant or decreasing". I merely pointed out the UK's population is continuing to rise. And incidentally, suc
55 Cornish : To give an idea just how much prices are growing in some areas, my partner bought his 2 bed flat in Staines about 7 years ago for £75,000. Last week
56 Post contains images Disruptivehair : Not to be rude but I've been to Staines; I wouldn't pay £215k for an unmodernized 2-bed flat there, especially with all that thundering overhead fro
57 Post contains images Cornish : Actually Staines itself is quieter than pretty much anywhere else in the area - especially if you along the river Laleham way like us. The beauty of
58 Post contains images Banco : If you are going to compare it to Feltham or Southall, I suppose so.... Silly place to build a castle, really; right under the Heathrow approach...
59 Post contains images Disruptivehair : Compared to where I live, it's very noisy. Hahahaha....she deserves it.
60 Cornish : I know. you'd have thought the CAA would have had a thing or two to say about that. One assumes a few plain brown envelopes smoothed things.....
61 Post contains images Skidmarks : And lets face it, you know ALL about brown envelopes don't you!! Andy
62 Disruptivehair : SOLD! They upped their offer to 180,000 pounds and we accepted. YAY! WE'RE COMING TO AMERICA SOON!
63 Post contains images Luv2fly : Lucky for us! Maybe you can take Air India you favorite airline here.
64 MaidensGator : My stepson recently bought a house; I lent him enough to make the down payment, but he rents two bedrooms to friends. He's in his mid twenties, but t
65 Post contains images Corey07850 : This is certainly the place to ask... Most A.net members are fully experienced in the cost of "ho use"
66 Post contains images 767Lover : Wahoo! Congrats and welcome back!
67 Post contains images Disruptivehair : They don't fly to Dallas, so most likely not. Thanks...we feel awesome about it. Hahaha, sorry about that; my glasses are 10 years old and I can't se
68 Sv2008 : I think it's more of an investment in the future. As soon as you start working, renting is a waste of money, putting money into something you don't o
69 Post contains images Disruptivehair : I understand their point, and on some levels it's a good one; but I just don't understand the pressure to own a house immediately after finishing uni
70 Post contains images Banco : That's an interesting point, because with the changes in financing a a degree now, British students are in the same position. I look back from my fai
71 Post contains images Gkirk : Apologies, I e-mailed WestAir telling them it'd be better for everyone if you were to remain isolated on the IOM £185k for a house? 4 bedroom house
72 Banco : That's quite expensive, given that you can buy the whole of Scotland for two shiny buttons and a can of Special Brew.
73 Post contains images Gkirk : I see yon English football fans were back to their best behaviour last night at the Tottenham game in Spain
74 Banco : Weak, Kirkie, weak....
75 Post contains images Gkirk : Truth, Banco, truth
76 Post contains images Skidmarks : As if they would take note of the ramblings of a demented Proclaimers fan, with all the personal attributes of a dead Haggis! WestAir will be the new
77 Post contains images Gkirk : Taken over by BA and disposed of? Thus putting you out of a job again?
78 Post contains images Skidmarks : Not this time my wee Scottish parasite! Andy
79 Banco : I know people who make a career out of being taken over by BA and put out of a job. No-one leaves BA poor, trust me on this. Some of us have jumped i
80 Post contains images Skidmarks : I hate to disillusion you old son but I will leave BA poor and very very bitter. But i will overcome and slang them off mercilessly Andy
81 Gkirk : Like Skidmarks? This'll be his 5th time.
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
I Got An Interview With Best Buy... posted Mon Sep 25 2006 08:47:04 by Iowaman
The "I've Got An A.net Bag Tag" Thread! posted Tue Aug 1 2006 22:10:04 by EHHO
An Old But Inspirational Cartoon posted Tue Apr 18 2006 14:48:26 by Yhmfan
Anyone Got An (Intel) Apple Macbook Yet? posted Thu Feb 16 2006 04:30:19 by DfwRevolution
Sorry We Got Raided, So Back To Jail You Go posted Sat Feb 4 2006 06:25:12 by L-188
Got An IPod? Get This For Christmas! posted Wed Dec 21 2005 14:43:53 by UTA_flyinghigh
Got An Old Mobile Phone? posted Sat Jan 22 2005 16:36:31 by Whitehatter
USS Reagan Arrives And We Got Hundred Of Whores! posted Sat Jun 26 2004 03:21:04 by Arcano
Got An Idea To Celebrate Non-avn Forum Return. posted Fri May 30 2003 10:22:30 by L-188
However We Got Here, It's Time To Back The Troops posted Tue Mar 18 2003 03:46:14 by Alpha 1