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Pope Publishes New Book  
User currently offlineLevent From France, joined Sep 2004, 1718 posts, RR: 5
Posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1507 times:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070413/ap_on_en_ot/pope_s_book

"Confronted with the abuse of economic power, with the cruelty of capitalism that degrades man into merchandise, we have begun to see more clearly the dangers of wealth and we understand in a new way what Jesus intended in warning us about wealth."
He criticizes lifestyles of the wealthy, citing "victims of drugs, of human trafficking, of sexual tourism, people destroyed on the inside, who are empty despite the abundance of their material goods."


And this comes from the leader of the Catholic Church, a man sitting on a mountain of wealth mainly built up through donations of people who, for some reason, think it will do them good to give their money to the Church instead of feeding their family from it.

What a cheek this man has. Religion has a lot to account for - and I don't mean only Catholics, this happens in any religion.

61 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently onlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39698 posts, RR: 75
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1487 times:

Sawasdee Levent.
Greetings from (Soi 13).  wave 


I agree with you 100%.
However, this needs to be heard throughout the entire Christian world, including the fundamentalist. I have a feeling his message will fall on deaf ears.  Sad



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 1465 times:

Quoting Levent (Thread starter):

And this comes from the leader of the Catholic Church, a man sitting on a mountain of wealth mainly built up through donations of people who, for some reason, think it will do them good to give their money to the Church instead of feeding their family from it.

Most clever phrases I ever heard. You must be seated in such mountain instead of Benedict XVI.


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 1459 times:

"

"YOU SHALL LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR AS YOURSELF"

ARTICLE 7
THE SEVENTH COMMANDMENT

You shall not steal.186

2401 The seventh commandment forbids unjustly taking or keeping the goods of one's neighbor and wronging him in any way with respect to his goods. It commands justice and charity in the care of earthly goods and the fruits of men's labor. For the sake of the common good, it requires respect for the universal destination of goods and respect for the right to private property. Christian life strives to order this world's goods to God and to fraternal charity.

I. THE UNIVERSAL DESTINATION AND THE PRIVATE OWNERSHIP OF GOODS

2402 In the beginning God entrusted the earth and its resources to the common stewardship of mankind to take care of them, master them by labor, and enjoy their fruits.187 The goods of creation are destined for the whole human race. However, the earth is divided up among men to assure the security of their lives, endangered by poverty and threatened by violence. The appropriation of property is legitimate for guaranteeing the freedom and dignity of persons and for helping each of them to meet his basic needs and the needs of those in his charge. It should allow for a natural solidarity to develop between men.

2403 The right to private property, acquired or received in a just way, does not do away with the original gift of the earth to the whole of mankind. The universal destination of goods remains primordial, even if the promotion of the common good requires respect for the right to private property and its exercise.

2404 "In his use of things man should regard the external goods he legitimately owns not merely as exclusive to himself but common to others also, in the sense that they can benefit others as well as himself."188 The ownership of any property makes its holder a steward of Providence, with the task of making it fruitful and communicating its benefits to others, first of all his family.

2405 Goods of production - material or immaterial - such as land, factories, practical or artistic skills, oblige their possessors to employ them in ways that will benefit the greatest number. Those who hold goods for use and consumption should use them with moderation, reserving the better part for guests, for the sick and the poor.

2406 Political authority has the right and duty to regulate the legitimate exercise of the right to ownership for the sake of the common good.189

II. RESPECT FOR PERSONS AND THEIR GOODS

2407 In economic matters, respect for human dignity requires the practice of the virtue of temperance, so as to moderate attachment to this world's goods; the practice of the virtue of justice, to preserve our neighbor's rights and render him what is his due; and the practice of solidarity, in accordance with the golden rule and in keeping with the generosity of the Lord, who "though he was rich, yet for your sake . . . became poor so that by his poverty, you might become rich."190

Respect for the goods of others

2408 The seventh commandment forbids theft, that is, usurping another's property against the reasonable will of the owner. There is no theft if consent can be presumed or if refusal is contrary to reason and the universal destination of goods. This is the case in obvious and urgent necessity when the only way to provide for immediate, essential needs (food, shelter, clothing . . .) is to put at one's disposal and use the property of others.191

2409 Even if it does not contradict the provisions of civil law, any form of unjustly taking and keeping the property of others is against the seventh commandment: thus, deliberate retention of goods lent or of objects lost; business fraud; paying unjust wages; forcing up prices by taking advantage of the ignorance or hardship of another.192

The following are also morally illicit: speculation in which one contrives to manipulate the price of goods artificially in order to gain an advantage to the detriment of others; corruption in which one influences the judgment of those who must make decisions according to law; appropriation and use for private purposes of the common goods of an enterprise; work poorly done; tax evasion; forgery of checks and invoices; excessive expenses and waste. Willfully damaging private or public property is contrary to the moral law and requires reparation.

2410 Promises must be kept and contracts strictly observed to the extent that the commitments made in them are morally just. A significant part of economic and social life depends on the honoring of contracts between physical or moral persons - commercial contracts of purchase or sale, rental or labor contracts. All contracts must be agreed to and executed in good faith.

2411 Contracts are subject to commutative justice which regulates exchanges between persons and between institutions in accordance with a strict respect for their rights. Commutative justice obliges strictly; it requires safeguarding property rights, paying debts, and fulfilling obligations freely contracted. Without commutative justice, no other form of justice is possible.

One distinguishes commutative justice from legal justice which concerns what the citizen owes in fairness to the community, and from distributive justice which regulates what the community owes its citizens in proportion to their contributions and needs.

2412 In virtue of commutative justice, reparation for injustice committed requires the restitution of stolen goods to their owner:

Jesus blesses Zacchaeus for his pledge: "If I have defrauded anyone of anything, I restore it fourfold."193 Those who, directly or indirectly, have taken possession of the goods of another, are obliged to make restitution of them, or to return the equivalent in kind or in money, if the goods have disappeared, as well as the profit or advantages their owner would have legitimately obtained from them. Likewise, all who in some manner have taken part in a theft or who have knowingly benefited from it - for example, those who ordered it, assisted in it, or received the stolen goods - are obliged to make restitution in proportion to their responsibility and to their share of what was stolen.

2413 Games of chance (card games, etc.) or wagers are not in themselves contrary to justice. They become morally unacceptable when they deprive someone of what is necessary to provide for his needs and those of others. The passion for gambling risks becoming an enslavement. Unfair wagers and cheating at games constitute grave matter, unless the damage inflicted is so slight that the one who suffers it cannot reasonably consider it significant.

2414 The seventh commandment forbids acts or enterprises that for any reason - selfish or ideological, commercial, or totalitarian - lead to the enslavement of human beings, to their being bought, sold and exchanged like merchandise, in disregard for their personal dignity. It is a sin against the dignity of persons and their fundamental rights to reduce them by violence to their productive value or to a source of profit. St. Paul directed a Christian master to treat his Christian slave "no longer as a slave but more than a slave, as a beloved brother, . . . both in the flesh and in the Lord."194

Respect for the integrity of creation

2415 The seventh commandment enjoins respect for the integrity of creation. Animals, like plants and inanimate beings, are by nature destined for the common good of past, present, and future humanity.195 Use of the mineral, vegetable, and animal resources of the universe cannot be divorced from respect for moral imperatives. Man's dominion over inanimate and other living beings granted by the Creator is not absolute; it is limited by concern for the quality of life of his neighbor, including generations to come; it requires a religious respect for the integrity of creation.196

2416 Animals are God's creatures. He surrounds them with his providential care. By their mere existence they bless him and give him glory.197 Thus men owe them kindness. We should recall the gentleness with which saints like St. Francis of Assisi or St. Philip Neri treated animals.

2417 God entrusted animals to the stewardship of those whom he created in his own image.198 Hence it is legitimate to use animals for food and clothing. They may be domesticated to help man in his work and leisure. Medical and scientific experimentation on animals is a morally acceptable practice if it remains within reasonable limits and contributes to caring for or saving human lives.

2418 It is contrary to human dignity to cause animals to suffer or die needlessly. It is likewise unworthy to spend money on them that should as a priority go to the relief of human misery. One can love animals; one should not direct to them the affection due only to persons.

III. THE SOCIAL DOCTRINE OF THE CHURCH

2419 "Christian revelation . . . promotes deeper understanding of the laws of social living."199 The Church receives from the Gospel the full revelation of the truth about man. When she fulfills her mission of proclaiming the Gospel, she bears witness to man, in the name of Christ, to his dignity and his vocation to the communion of persons. She teaches him the demands of justice and peace in conformity with divine wisdom.

2420 The Church makes a moral judgment about economic and social matters, "when the fundamental rights of the person or the salvation of souls requires it."200 In the moral order she bears a mission distinct from that of political authorities: the Church is concerned with the temporal aspects of the common good because they are ordered to the sovereign Good, our ultimate end. She strives to inspire right attitudes with respect to earthly goods and in socio-economic relationships.

2421 The social doctrine of the Church developed in the nineteenth century when the Gospel encountered modern industrial society with its new structures for the production of consumer goods, its new concept of society, the state and authority, and its new forms of labor and ownership. The development of the doctrine of the Church on economic and social matters attests the permanent value of the Church's teaching at the same time as it attests the true meaning of her Tradition, always living and active.201

2422 The Church's social teaching comprises a body of doctrine, which is articulated as the Church interprets events in the course of history, with the assistance of the Holy Spirit, in the light of the whole of what has been revealed by Jesus Christ.202 This teaching can be more easily accepted by men of good will, the more the faithful let themselves be guided by it.

2423 The Church's social teaching proposes principles for reflection; it provides criteria for judgment; it gives guidelines for action:

Any system in which social relationships are determined entirely by economic factors is contrary to the nature of the human person and his acts.203

2424 A theory that makes profit the exclusive norm and ultimate end of economic activity is morally unacceptable. The disordered desire for money cannot but produce perverse effects. It is one of the causes of the many conflicts which disturb the social order.204

A system that "subordinates the basic rights of individuals and of groups to the collective organization of production" is contrary to human dignity.205 Every practice that reduces persons to nothing more than a means of profit enslaves man, leads to idolizing money, and contributes to the spread of atheism. "You cannot serve God and mammon."206

2425 The Church has rejected the totalitarian and atheistic ideologies associated in modem times with "communism" or "socialism." She has likewise refused to accept, in the practice of "capitalism," individualism and the absolute primacy of the law of the marketplace over human labor.207 Regulating the economy solely by centralized planning perverts the basis of social bonds; regulating it solely by the law of the marketplace fails social justice, for "there are many human needs which cannot be satisfied by the market."208 Reasonable regulation of the marketplace and economic initiatives, in keeping with a just hierarchy of values and a view to the common good, is to be commended.

IV. ECONOMIC ACTIVITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

2426 The development of economic activity and growth in production are meant to provide for the needs of human beings. Economic life is not meant solely to multiply goods produced and increase profit or power; it is ordered first of all to the service of persons, of the whole man, and of the entire human community. Economic activity, conducted according to its own proper methods, is to be exercised within the limits of the moral order, in keeping with social justice so as to correspond to God's plan for man.209

2427 Human work proceeds directly from persons created in the image of God and called to prolong the work of creation by subduing the earth, both with and for one another.210 Hence work is a duty: "If any one will not work, let him not eat."211 Work honors the Creator's gifts and the talents received from him. It can also be redemptive. By enduring the hardship of work212 in union with Jesus, the carpenter of Nazareth and the one crucified on Calvary, man collaborates in a certain fashion with the Son of God in his redemptive work. He shows himself to be a disciple of Christ by carrying the cross, daily, in the work he is called to accomplish.213 Work can be a means of sanctification and a way of animating earthly realities with the Spirit of Christ.

2428 In work, the person exercises and fulfills in part the potential inscribed in his nature. The primordial value of labor stems from man himself, its author and its beneficiary. Work is for man, not man for work.214

Everyone should be able to draw from work the means of providing for his life and that of his family, and of serving the human community.

2429 Everyone has the right of economic initiative; everyone should make legitimate use of his talents to contribute to the abundance that will benefit all and to harvest the just fruits of his labor. He should seek to observe regulations issued by legitimate authority for the sake of the common good.215

2430 Economic life brings into play different interests, often opposed to one another. This explains why the conflicts that characterize it arise.216 Efforts should be made to reduce these conflicts by negotiation that respects the rights and duties of each social partner: those responsible for business enterprises, representatives of wage- earners (for example, trade unions), and public authorities when appropriate.

2431 The responsibility of the state. "Economic activity, especially the activity of a market economy, cannot be conducted in an institutional, juridical, or political vacuum. On the contrary, it presupposes sure guarantees of individual freedom and private property, as well as a stable currency and efficient public services. Hence the principal task of the state is to guarantee this security, so that those who work and produce can enjoy the fruits of their labors and thus feel encouraged to work efficiently and honestly. . . . Another task of the state is that of overseeing and directing the exercise of human rights in the economic sector. However, primary responsibility in this area belongs not to the state but to individuals and to the various groups and associations which make up society."217

2432 Those responsible for business enterprises are responsible to society for the economic and ecological effects of their operations.218 They have an obligation to consider the good of persons and not only the increase of profits. Profits are necessary, however. They make possible the investments that ensure the future of a business and they guarantee employment.

2433 Access to employment and to professions must be open to all without unjust discrimination: men and women, healthy and disabled, natives and immigrants.219 For its part society should, according to circumstances, help citizens find work and employment.220

2434 A just wage is the legitimate fruit of work. To refuse or withhold it can be a grave injustice.221 In determining fair pay both the needs and the contributions of each person must be taken into account. "Remuneration for work should guarantee man the opportunity to provide a dignified livelihood for himself and his family on the material, social, cultural and spiritual level, taking into account the role and the productivity of each, the state of the business, and the common good."222 Agreement between the parties is not sufficient to justify morally the amount to be received in wages.

2435 Recourse to a strike is morally legitimate when it cannot be avoided, or at least when it is necessary to obtain a proportionate benefit. It becomes morally unacceptable when accompanied by violence, or when objectives are included that are not directly linked to working conditions or are contrary to the common good.

2436 It is unjust not to pay the social security contributions required by legitimate authority.

Unemployment almost always wounds its victim's dignity and threatens the equilibrium of his life. Besides the harm done to him personally, it entails many risks for his family.223

V. JUSTICE AND SOLIDARITY AMONG NATIONS

2437 On the international level, inequality of resources and economic capability is such that it creates a real "gap" between nations.224 On the one side there are those nations possessing and developing the means of growth and, on the other, those accumulating debts.

2438 Various causes of a religious, political, economic, and financial nature today give "the social question a worldwide dimension."225 There must be solidarity among nations which are already politically interdependent. It is even more essential when it is a question of dismantling the "perverse mechanisms" that impede the development of the less advanced countries.226 In place of abusive if not usurious financial systems, iniquitous commercial relations among nations, and the arms race, there must be substituted a common effort to mobilize resources toward objectives of moral, cultural, and economic development, "redefining the priorities and hierarchies of values."227

2439 Rich nations have a grave moral responsibility toward those which are unable to ensure the means of their development by themselves or have been prevented from doing so by tragic historical events. It is a duty in solidarity and charity; it is also an obligation in justice if the prosperity of the rich nations has come from resources that have not been paid for fairly.

2440 Direct aid is an appropriate response to immediate, extraordinary needs caused by natural catastrophes, epidemics, and the like. But it does not suffice to repair the grave damage resulting from destitution or to provide a lasting solution to a country's needs. It is also necessary to reform international economic and financial institutions so that they will better promote equitable relationships with less advanced countries.228 The efforts of poor countries working for growth and liberation must be supported.229 This doctrine must be applied especially in the area of agricultural labor. Peasants, especially in the Third World, form the overwhelming majority of the poor.

2441 An increased sense of God and increased self-awareness are fundamental to any full development of human society. This development multiplies material goods and puts them at the service of the person and his freedom. It reduces dire poverty and economic exploitation. It makes for growth in respect for cultural identities and openness to the transcendent.230

2442 It is not the role of the Pastors of the Church to intervene directly in the political structuring and organization of social life. This task is part of the vocation of the lay faithful, acting on their own initiative with their fellow citizens. Social action can assume various concrete forms. It should always have the common good in view and be in conformity with the message of the Gospel and the teaching of the Church. It is the role of the laity "to animate temporal realities with Christian commitment, by which they show that they are witnesses and agents of peace and justice."231

* VI. LOVE FOR THE POOR

2443 God blesses those who come to the aid of the poor and rebukes those who turn away from them: "Give to him who begs from you, do not refuse him who would borrow from you"; "you received without pay, give without pay."232 It is by what they have done for the poor that Jesus Christ will recognize his chosen ones.233 When "the poor have the good news preached to them," it is the sign of Christ's presence.234

2444 "The Church's love for the poor . . . is a part of her constant tradition." This love is inspired by the Gospel of the Beatitudes, of the poverty of Jesus, and of his concern for the poor.235 Love for the poor is even one of the motives for the duty of working so as to "be able to give to those in need."236 It extends not only to material poverty but also to the many forms of cultural and religious poverty.237

2445 Love for the poor is incompatible with immoderate love of riches or their selfish use:

Come now, you rich, weep and howl for the miseries that are coming upon you. Your riches have rotted and your garments are moth-eaten. Your gold and silver have rusted, and their rust will be evidence against you and will eat your flesh like fire. You have laid up treasure for the last days. Behold, the wages of the laborers who mowed your fields, which you kept back by fraud, cry out; and the cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of hosts. You have lived on the earth in luxury and in pleasure; you have fattened your hearts in a day of slaughter. You have condemned, you have killed the righteous man; he does not resist you.238

2446 St. John Chrysostom vigorously recalls this: "Not to enable the poor to share in our goods is to steal from them and deprive them of life. The goods we possess are not ours, but theirs."239 "The demands of justice must be satisfied first of all; that which is already due in justice is not to be offered as a gift of charity":240

When we attend to the needs of those in want, we give them what is theirs, not ours. More than performing works of mercy, we are paying a debt of justice.241

2447 The works of mercy are charitable actions by which we come to the aid of our neighbor in his spiritual and bodily necessities.242 Instructing, advising, consoling, comforting are spiritual works of mercy, as are forgiving and bearing wrongs patiently. The corporal works of mercy consist especially in feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless, clothing the naked, visiting the sick and imprisoned, and burying the dead.243 Among all these, giving alms to the poor is one of the chief witnesses to fraternal charity: it is also a work of justice pleasing to God:244

He who has two coats, let him share with him who has none and he who has food must do likewise.245 But give for alms those things which are within; and behold, everything is clean for you.246 If a brother or sister is ill-clad and in lack of daily food, and one of you says to them, "Go in peace, be warmed and filled," without giving them the things needed for the body, what does it profit?247

2448 "In its various forms - material deprivation, unjust oppression, physical and psychological illness and death - human misery is the obvious sign of the inherited condition of frailty and need for salvation in which man finds himself as a consequence of original sin. This misery elicited the compassion of Christ the Savior, who willingly took it upon himself and identified himself with the least of his brethren. Hence, those who are oppressed by poverty are the object of a preferential love on the part of the Church which, since her origin and in spite of the failings of many of her members, has not ceased to work for their relief, defense, and liberation through numerous works of charity which remain indispensable always and everywhere."248

2449 Beginning with the Old Testament, all kinds of juridical measures (the jubilee year of forgiveness of debts, prohibition of loans at interest and the keeping of collateral, the obligation to tithe, the daily payment of the day-laborer, the right to glean vines and fields) answer the exhortation of Deuteronomy: "For the poor will never cease out of the land; therefore I command you, 'You shall open wide your hand to your brother, to the needy and to the poor in the land.'"249 Jesus makes these words his own: "The poor you always have with you, but you do not always have me."250 In so doing he does not soften the vehemence of former oracles against "buying the poor for silver and the needy for a pair of sandals . . .," but invites us to recognize his own presence in the poor who are his brethren:251

When her mother reproached her for caring for the poor and the sick at home, St. Rose of Lima said to her: "When we serve the poor and the sick, we serve Jesus. We must not fail to help our neighbors, because in them we serve Jesus.252

IN BRIEF

2450 "You shall not steal" (Ex 20:15; Deut 5:19). "Neither thieves, nor the greedy . . ., nor robbers will inherit the kingdom of God" (1 Cor 6:10).

2451 The seventh commandment enjoins the practice of justice and charity in the administration of earthly goods and the fruits of men's labor.

2452 The goods of creation are destined for the entire human race. The right to private property does not abolish the universal destination of goods.

2453 The seventh commandment forbids theft. Theft is the usurpation of another's goods against the reasonable will of the owner.

2454 Every manner of taking and using another's property unjustly is contrary to the seventh commandment. The injustice committed requires reparation. Commutative justice requires the restitution of stolen goods.

2455 The moral law forbids acts which, for commercial or totalitarian purposes, lead to the enslavement of human beings, or to their being bought, sold or exchanged like merchandise.

2456 The dominion granted by the Creator over the mineral, vegetable, and animal resources of the universe cannot be separated from respect for moral obligations, including those toward generations to come.

2457 Animals are entrusted to man's stewardship; he must show them kindness. They may be used to serve the just satisfaction of man's needs.

2458 The Church makes a judgment about economic and social matters when the fundamental rights of the person or the salvation of souls requires it. She is concerned with the temporal common good of men because they are ordered to the sovereign Good, their ultimate end.

2459 Man is himself the author, center, and goal of all economic and social life. The decisive point of the social question is that goods created by God for everyone should in fact reach everyone in accordance with justice and with the help of charity.

2460 The primordial value of labor stems from man himself, its author and beneficiary. By means of his labor man participates in the work of creation. Work united to Christ can be redemptive.

2461 True development concerns the whole man. It is concerned with increasing each person's ability to respond to his vocation and hence to God's call (cf. CA 29).

2462 Giving alms to the poor is a witness to fraternal charity: it is also a work of justice pleasing to God.

2463 How can we not recognize Lazarus, the hungry beggar in the parable (cf. Lk 17:19-31), in the multitude of human beings without bread, a roof or a place to stay? How can we fail to hear Jesus: "As you did it not to one of the least of these, you did it not to me" (Mt 25:45)?

186 Ex 20:15; Deut 5:19; Mt 19:18.
187 Cf. Gen 1:26-29.
188 GS 69 § 1.
189 Cf. GS 71 § 4; SRS 42; CA 40; 48.
190 2 Cor 8:9.
191 Cf. GS 69 § 1.
192 Cf. Deut 25:13-16; 24:14-15; Jas 5:4; Am 8:4-6.
193 Lk 19:8.
194 Philem 16.
195 Cf. Gen 128-31.
196 Cf. CA 37-38.
197 Cf. Mt 6:26; Dan 3:79-81.
198 Cf. Gen 2:19-20; 9:1-4.
199 GS 23 § 1.
200 GS 76 § 5.
201 Cf. CA 3.
202 Cf. SRS 1; 41.
203 Cf. CA 24.
204 Cf. GS 63 § 3; LE 7; 20; CA 35.
205 GS 65 § 2.
206 Mt 6:24; Lk 16:13.
207 Cf. CA 10; 13; 44.
208 CA 34.
209 Cf. GS 64.
210 Cf. Gen 1:28; GS 34; CA 31.
211 2 Thess 3:10; Cf. 1 Thess 4:11.
212 Cf. Gen 3:14-19.
213 Cf. LE 27.
214 Cf. LE 6.
215 Cf. CA 32; 34.
216 Cf. LE 11.
217 CA 48.
218 Cf. CA 37.
219 Cf. LE 19; 22-23.
220 Cf. CA 48.
221 Cf. Lev 19:13; Deut 24:14-15; Jas 5:4
222 GS 67 § 2.
223 Cf. LE 18.
224 Cf. SRS 14.
225 SRS 9.
226 Cf. SRS 17; 45.
227 CA 28; cf. 35.
228 Cf. SRS 16.
229 Cf. CA 26.
230 Cf. SRS 32; CA 51.
231 SRS 47 § 6; cf. 42.
232 Mt 5:42; 10:8.
233 Cf. Mt 25:31-36.
234 Mt 11:5; cf. Lk 4:18.
235 CA 57; cf. Lk 6:20-22, Mt 8:20; Mk 12:41-44.
236 Eph 4:28.
237 Cf. CA 57.
238 Jas 5:1-6.
239 St. John Chrysostom, Hom. in Lazaro 2,5:PG 48,992.
240 AA 8 § 5.
241 St. Gregory the Great, Regula Pastoralis. 3,21:PL 77,87.
242 Cf. Isa 58:6-7; Heb 13:3.
243 Cf. Mt 25:31-46.
244 Cf. Tob 4:5-11; Sir 17:22; Mt 6:2-4.
245 Lk 3:11.
246 Lk 11:41.
247 Jas 2:15-16; cf. 1 Jn 3:17.
248 CDF, instruction, Libertatis conscientia, 68.
249 Deut 15:11.
250 Jn 12:8.
251 Am 8:6; cf. Mt 25:40.
252 P. Hansen, Vita mirabilis (Louvain, 1668).

"


http://www.vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p3s2c2a7.htm


User currently offlineTheCol From Canada, joined Jan 2007, 2038 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 1458 times:

Quoting Levent (Thread starter):
Religion has a lot to account for - and I don't mean only Catholics, this happens in any religion.

Greed corrupts people, it doesn't matter if those people are CEO's, religious leaders, etc.



No matter how random things may appear, there's always a plan.
User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 1453 times:

Quoting TheCol (Reply 4):
Greed corrupts people, it doesn't matter if those people are CEO's, religious leaders, etc.

Are you implying that the Pope is greedy?

Edited: typo.

[Edited 2007-04-14 20:10:07]

User currently offlineGunsontheroof From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 3500 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 1449 times:

Quoting Levent (Thread starter):
"Confronted with the abuse of economic power, with the cruelty of capitalism that degrades man into merchandise, we have begun to see more clearly the dangers of wealth and we understand in a new way what Jesus intended in warning us about wealth."
He criticizes lifestyles of the wealthy, citing "victims of drugs, of human trafficking, of sexual tourism, people destroyed on the inside, who are empty despite the abundance of their material goods."

(looking about frantically)

Did my views just align with The Pope's?!?!?

Look for an article about a raving lunatic being subdued by the Olympia police department in tomorrow's Olympian.



Next Flight: 9/17 BFI-BFI
User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 1443 times:

"

Pope Benedict XVI has finished work on the first book of what he hopes will become a two volume exploration into the person of Jesus Christ. Press releases from the both Vatican Press Office and Publishing House announced today that "Jesus of Nazareth, From His Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration," is to provide a historic and theological analysis of the figure of Jesus.

However, in an advance copy of the preface the Pontiff reportedly admits, that because, “I don't know how much time and how much strength will still be granted to me, I have decided to publish the first 10 chapters as the first volume. The book, which has been sent to the Vatican Publishing House for printing, is expected to be released in the spring of 2007.

In its communiqué, the Vatican Publishing House thanked the Holy Father for sending the work along and announced its intent to work quickly for worldwide distribution of this, the first work of Benedict XVI. The Publishing House also announced that it has established an agreement with Rizzoli Publishing House for increased distribution of the work.

The Pope began writing the book when he was still a cardinal and serving as Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, in 2003. He was able to put the finishing touches on it while on vacation this summer.

The Pontiff indicates in the book’s foreword that this should not be considered infallible from a magisterial point of view. "This work is not an absolute act of magisterial teaching, but merely an expression of my personal research into the face of the Lord. Therefore, everyone is free to contradict me," Pope Benedict stated.

The Pontiff said his intent was, "to present the Jesus of the Gospels as the one true Jesus, like the historic Jesus, in an authentic sense of the expression."

"The teaching of Jesus does not stem from human learning. It comes from intimate contact with the Father, from face to face dialogue, to see that which is in the depths of the Father. It is the Word of the Son," continued the Pope in his introduction.

The Rizzoli Publishing House announced that the work of the Holy Father is a "magnificent fresco, in two volumes, on what the Pope describes as ‘the mystery of Jesus.’"

As the work enters the world’s forum, added the Italian publishing house, "the Pope offers his original interpretations and historic-theological analysis of the foundation of the Christian faith, continuing with the scientific work that has been carried out over the past 50 years."

"Benedict XVI describes Jesus with great passion, permitting every reader to reflect inwardly and to be touched by Christ; at the same time conserving a rigorous scientific line that characterizes the writings and speeches of the scholar."


"

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/new.php?n=8104


User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1427 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 1):
I have a feeling his message will fall on deaf ears.

 yes 

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 5):
Are you implying that the Pope is greedy?

 yes 

It's too bad we can't value eachother as much as we do money.


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1415 times:

Quoting TedTAce (Reply 8):
It's too bad

Is too bad that somebody arrive into a conclusion about a book that has not even released yet.


User currently offlineWrighbrothers From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2005, 1875 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1412 times:

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 3):

I'm not criticising you, I just want to know, what was the point of that post ?

Quoting TheCol (Reply 4):
Greed corrupts people, it doesn't matter if those people are CEO's, religious leaders, etc.

It certainly does, the bible was written by humans, and the vast majority of people, aren't strictly religious and so are 'free' to do what they want.

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 5):
Are you implying that the Pope is greedy?

Well, maybe he was or wasn't, I'll let him speak for himself, but the fact that the pope drives round in bullet proof cars, lives in his own country (he is technically in-charge) could suggest greed, I mean, why have your own country for the elite few to live in ?

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 2):
Most clever phrases I ever heard. You must be seated in such mountain instead of Benedict XVI.

see above, I highly doubt the poster lives in his own country and drives around in expensive cars. He criticized the life of the rich, when he himself is rich, does he see himself as 'exempt' from the immortals of wealth because he's close to god ??
IMHO, religion will never be truly happy.

Wrighbrothers



Always stand up for what is right, even if it means standing alone..
User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1403 times:

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 10):
the pope drives round in bullet proof cars

Like most chief of States around the world.

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 10):
lives in his own country (he is technically in-charge) could suggest greed

Not HOS country. In a sovereign country.

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 10):
why have your own country for the elite few to live in ?

Once again. Is NOT His country.

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 10):
He criticized the life of the rich, when he himself is rich, does he see himself as 'exempt' from the immortals of wealth because he's close to god ??

Where? In his new book?


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1400 times:

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 10):
and the vast majority of people, aren't strictly religious and so are 'free' to do what they want.

Are you sure of that. I have serious doubts about the veracity if this assertion. BTW, who said that religious people are not free to do what they want [and still be religious].

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 10):

It certainly does, the bible was written by humans

And is the " Word of the Lord ".

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 10):
but the fact that the pope drives round in bullet proof cars

Do you remember Ali Agca... >>> http://archives.cnn.com/2000/WORLD/europe/06/13/pope.gunman.03/

Edited: typo.

[Edited 2007-04-14 22:10:10]

User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1395 times:

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 9):
Is too bad that somebody arrive into a conclusion about a book that has not even released yet.

Where did I say ANYTHING about the BOOK? I said I thought the Pope was greedy. Do I have to point out the book as further evidence or is 1500+ years of Catholic Church greed not enough?


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1389 times:

Quoting TedTAce (Reply 13):
Do I have to point out the book as further evidence or is 1500+ years of Catholic Church greed not enough?

Can you?

Because the book is not even got sale yet.


User currently offlineWrighbrothers From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2005, 1875 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1389 times:

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 11):
Like most chief of States around the world.

But those cars are expensive. The point I'm making is, why does he feel he can criticize those better off ?

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 11):
Where? In his new book?

If you are referring to criticizing the life of the rich, then yes, he is criticizing the fact that they are rich.

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 12):
Are you sure of that. I have serious doubts about the veracity if this assertion. BTW, who said that religious people are not free to do what they want [and still be religious].

Yes I am, I'm pretty sure because the vast majority of people where I live, who believe in God, don't go to church or pray, and I'd think that is the case in most 1st world countries, not all, but some-most. It's a simple case of people not obeying the 10 commandments, not caring about sinning etc. Why can't you accept that not everyone is strictly religious. As for your second point, I believe that you can enjoy life more without having to worry about committing sins and displeasing God. While you would argue that you can, so the answer is, both of us are right, in our own minds, because neither of us think the same, so we can't agree.

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 12):
And is the " Word of the Lord ".

But is written by a been misinterpreted, or mishuman, so it could have understood through a 'Chinese whispers' type thing. So how do we know it's true, after all, who's to say that they didn't elaborate the stories ?

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 12):
Do you remember Ali Agca... >>> http://archives.cnn.com/2000/WORLD/e...n.03/

Yes I do know of that, and the Pope of the time forgave him, however, my point is, he is criticizing the life of those who have wealth and don't share it, yet he drives around in an expensive car and lives in a country where only the elite can live.

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 11):
Not HOS country. In a sovereign country.

I'm guessing you mean, not HIS country ?? (not being rude)
Quoting Wikipedia:
"The Pope is ex officio head of state and head of government of Vatican City. He is simultaneously and primordially the bishop of the Diocese of Rome, and Supreme Pontiff of the Catholic Church. The term Holy See expresses the totality of his governance and pastoral ministry. His official title with regard to Vatican City is Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City.

The papacy is a non-hereditary, elective monarchy, chosen by the College of Cardinals. The pope is also technically an absolute monarch, meaning he has total legislative, executive and judicial power over the Vatican City. He is the only absolute monarch in Europe."

The United Kingdom is the Queens country, the same way the Vatican city is his. He is the absolute leader, so who does own it then, god ?

Wrighbrothers



Always stand up for what is right, even if it means standing alone..
User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 1381 times:

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 15):
But those cars are expensive.

Where did I say that they are cheap?

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 15):

If you are referring to criticizing the life of the rich, then yes, he is criticizing the fact that they are rich.

Once again: Where? Can you tell me in which document did He say so?

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 15):

Yes I am, I'm pretty sure because the vast majority of people where I live

Can you show me numbers, statistics, [whatever] that prove what you say?

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 15):

But is written by a been misinterpreted, or mishuman,



Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 15):
he is criticizing the life of those who have wealth and don't share it

Where? For the last time. Show me where.

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 15):
I'm guessing you mean, not HIS country ??

Right, my error.

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 15):
The Pope is ex officio head of state and head of government of Vatican City. He is simultaneously and primordially the bishop of the Diocese of Rome, and Supreme Pontiff of the Catholic Church. The term Holy See expresses the totality of his governance and pastoral ministry. His official title with regard to Vatican City is Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City.

He doesn't own The Vatican.

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 15):
So how do we know it's true, after all, who's to say that they didn't elaborate the stories ?

By faith.


User currently offlineWrighbrothers From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2005, 1875 posts, RR: 9
Reply 17, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 1375 times:

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 16):
Once again: Where? Can you tell me in which document did He say so?

In his book
"we have begun to see more clearly the dangers of wealth and we understand in a new way what Jesus intended in warning us about wealth."

Benedict continues that message in another chapter on the biblical parable of the Good Samaritan, and the need to love one's neighbor. In it, Benedict decries how the wealthy have "plundered" Africa and the Third World, both materially and spiritually, through colonialism.

He criticizes lifestyles of the wealthy, citing "victims of drugs, of human trafficking, of sexual tourism, people destroyed on the inside, who are empty despite the abundance of their material goods."

Maybe I interpret it wrong, but I personally see that a criticizing the rich.

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 16):
Can you show me numbers, statistics, [whatever] that prove what you say?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/wtwtgod/3518375.stm

Wrighbrothers



Always stand up for what is right, even if it means standing alone..
User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1367 times:

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 17):
In his book
"we have begun to see more clearly the dangers of wealth and we understand in a new way what Jesus intended in warning us about wealth."

Benedict continues that message in another chapter on the biblical parable of the Good Samaritan, and the need to love one's neighbor. In it, Benedict decries how the wealthy have "plundered" Africa and the Third World, both materially and spiritually, through colonialism.

He criticizes lifestyles of the wealthy, citing "victims of drugs, of human trafficking, of sexual tourism, people destroyed on the inside, who are empty despite the abundance of their material goods."

Maybe I interpret it wrong, but I personally see that a criticizing the rich.

The only thing that I can see here, is that you are quoting what a journalist [or a third person] said. Except for the first sentence, that apparently are Ratzinger's words, the rest is a commentary. I sincerely think that if somebody wants to criticized [seriously] the book [any book], the first thing to do, is to READ IT.

The first edition is going to be in German, Italian and Polish. The English version will be available until May.

I sincerely prefer to do a responsible "critic" after a careful reading of the book [not before], and not based nor biased by commentaries. Make my own conclusions based on my lecture, not others.

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 17):
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/wtwtgod/3518375.stm

From the link provided by you:

"

A survey of people's religious beliefs in 10 countries suggests the UK is among the most secular nations in the world.

Ten thousand people were questioned in the poll by research company ICM for the BBC programme What The World Thinks Of God.

More than a quarter of Britons thought the world would be more peaceful with nobody believing in God, but very few people in other countries agreed.

The survey found the highest levels of belief in some of the world's poorer countries, but also in the world's richest, America...."

Not a single word or phrase in such article support your thesis. Not even in the UK where :"67% of Britons said they believed in God or a higher power".


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1363 times:

Quoting TedTAce (Reply 13):

Where did I say ANYTHING about the BOOK?

Isn't this thread about "the book"? Nothing else.


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1358 times:

Quoting TedTAce (Reply 13):
I said I thought the Pope was greedy.

Worst things [all false] has been told about Jesus.
I'll bet that the Pope is totally careless about what you think of Him. He doesn't even know you.

Quoting TedTAce (Reply 13):
Do I have to point out the book as further evidence or is 1500+ years of Catholic Church greed not enough?

Not a bad idea.

[Edited 2007-04-15 02:06:05]

User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1344 times:

So let's see:

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 14):
Can you?

Because the book is not even got sale yet.

Then

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 19):
Isn't this thread about "the book"? Nothing else.

Then

Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 20):
I'll bet that the Pope is totally careless about what you think of Him.



Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 20):
He doesn't even know you



Quoting TACAA320 (Reply 20):
Not a bad idea.

3 different replies to the same thing. I must have rattled your cage or something. Where did I say anything about the Pope caring about me? Why does my response have to be limited to the thread's TITLE when the SUBJECT is Catholic greed? Sounds like a nerve has been hit to me. TACAA, I STRONGLY suggest you stop reading and responding to me. It's obviously upsetting you, and if you are right, I'm not worth it. I would bother to re-hash the same points I always bring up that you have no rational answer to, but I'm tired of watching my posts, that while factually true, come off as flame bait thus wasting EVERYBODYS time. Forget about me TACAA, it's the best way to get a good nights sleep.


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1340 times:

Quoting TedTAce (Reply 21):
3 different replies to the same thing.

So?

BTW, don't worry about my sleep. I do it quite well, even without sleeping pills.  Wink


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1338 times:

Quoting TedTAce (Reply 21):
I'm not worth it.

That's definitely right!


User currently offlineTACAA320 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (7 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1327 times:

Quoting Wrighbrothers (Reply 17):
"we have begun to see more clearly the dangers of wealth and we understand in a new way what Jesus intended in warning us about wealth."

Benedict continues that message in another chapter on the biblical parable of the Good Samaritan, and the need to love one's neighbor. In it, Benedict decries how the wealthy have "plundered" Africa and the Third World, both materially and spiritually, through colonialism.

He criticizes lifestyles of the wealthy, citing "victims of drugs, of human trafficking, of sexual tourism, people destroyed on the inside, who are empty despite the abundance of their material goods."

Maybe I interpret it wrong, but I personally see that a criticizing the rich.

According with the Catholic doctrine, richness is not a problem, poverty is. Nevertheless, wealthiness that take a person to "...drugs, of human trafficking, of sexual tourism, people destroyed on the inside, who are empty despite the abundance of their material goods..." is a real problem.

I don't have the book, but as soon as I can I will buy it and read it in order to have elements to criticize it. But not before that.


25 Rammstein : There's an old saying: if you don't want to starve, become a priest.
26 Post contains images TedTAce : Souunds like you know the difference. Good "Christian" reaction.
27 Wrighbrothers : Actually, yes there is. The fact that it concludes that only 67% of people believe in a higher-power OR God (ie- some might not believe in God) and t
28 TACAA320 : Who doesn't? That's right. But the money is necessary to buy drugs or become a sex trafficker. In England only, three years ago and based in a "poll"
29 TACAA320 : Interesting that... " Almost 30% of all atheists surveyed said they sometimes prayed ICM poll " Are they "really" atheist?
30 Post contains images Scbriml : And how exactly did the Catholic church acquire most of its vast, vast wealth?
31 TACAA320 : Maybe you can illustrate us in this regard.
32 TACAA320 : Is the only way to make a fair judgement. You can't judge a book by its cover. Wrong. BTW, how many religious books did you read in the last years?
33 Post contains images Joni : The Catholic church and the Vatican aren't as fabulously wealthy as sometimes rumoured. They publish their accounts and IIRC they had some problems m
34 QANTASforever : Good Heavens - TACAA320, the Vatican should hire you to do their PR. Any whiff of a scandal you'd baffle the press with bollocks disguised in a "War a
35 Scbriml : I don't know really. It could be that every Catholic church I've ever visited in some of the poorest places on Earth is dripping in gold and art trea
36 TACAA320 : I rather call Him the "Head of The Vatican State" [avoid the term "country"]. That's what I supposed from the very beginning.
37 Post contains images Scbriml : Selective quoting or blindness?
38 Post contains images TACAA320 : None of them. Just the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.
39 Post contains images Scbriml : Well, there are certainly some home truths that many Catholics chose to ignore. I guess that's why they call it blind faith.
40 TheCol : No, I'm just pointing out a fact to those who believe greed is exclusive to religion.
41 Post contains links TACAA320 : Really. How which ones? The real reason of a blind faith is precisely in The Bible: 1 1 Faith is the realization of what is hoped for and evidence 2
42 TACAA320 : "Fe de erratas" Correct question:Which ones ?
43 Post contains images Wrighbrothers : You asked for proof, and I gave you proof. But that's only an unidentified "poll" I'm not sure what your point is exactly but: I don't know, I didn't
44 TACAA320 : Just taken from the link provided by you. I prefer the "facts" over "speculation". Can you prove that?
45 TACAA320 : Still waiting for an answer.
46 Post contains images TedTAce : I didn't know this was a 'timed event'. TACAA, I wish you could look at this thread objectively. I know I would be ashamed if I were you.
47 TACAA320 : It isn't. Even more, my commentary [the one you quoted] was not precisely addressed to you. Don't worry. Your wish will come true. "Ashamed" of what?
48 Wrighbrothers : I could, but not with proof that you'd agree with. Because I can't magically whip up some world-wide survey that asked everyone on earth, I provided
49 Scbriml : Maybe the ones I listed as a starting point? Thanks for the clarification of faith (not that I actually needed it - even a heathen like me can unders
50 TACAA320 : Choosing just a few of your points against the CC. The CC don't said who goes to heaven or to hell. I must admit that it was a medieval position avoi
51 TACAA320 : I don't have the intention to impress you nor anybody. If I copy/paste from a website, is because other people has the answer to some of your questio
52 Post contains links TACAA320 : "Where God is considered only a secondary greatness that you can temporarily or permanently put aside for the sake of more important things, those imp
53 Post contains images Scbriml : Your limited knowledge of English is better than many of those that are born here! While I would be happy to converse in Spanish, it would be a fairl
54 TACAA320 : Mejor cuatro, dos para cada uno ! Unfortunately we can't celebrate [at least today] after the massacre at VA Tech. Very sad terrorist attack! RIP to
55 TACAA320 : Indeed. You have such right. I publicly apologize with you and the rest in this forum for my rudeness.
56 Post contains links TACAA320 : " "Everyone is free, then, to contradict me," he says. Benedict—a prolific theologian well before he became pope—sets out to give a thorough exami
57 Post contains images Wrighbrothers : So do you mean their is more than one book of guidance ? That is most likely true, my knowledge of the CC doesn't extend beyond what most (non-Cathol
58 TACAA320 : eg. Catholic Catechism and some others.
59 JGPH1A : It's amazing what wielding the threat of a red-hot poker up the ass combined with 1000 years of absolute power can do for your bank balance - kaCHING
60 TACAA320 : Yes. I born and raised in a Catholic family, and I spent my junior and high school (12 years) in a Spaniard Catholic School.
61 Post contains links TACAA320 : " An important source of Christian beliefs is the Bible: Some Protestant Christian faith groups follow two of the main slogans of the Reformation: "so
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